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Jean Paul Belmondo

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1990 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When "Cyrano de Bergerac" was first performed on the stage in Paris in 1897, it so impressed a government minister in the audience that he summoned the author, Edmond Rostand, to his balcony loge during the scene change before the final act.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2012 | By Susan King
The Los Angeles Film Critics Assn. has named renowned documentary filmmaker Frederick Wiseman  the recipient of the group's career achievement award. The 82-year-old Emmy-winning documentarian will receive the award at a ceremony Jan. 12 at the Intercontinental Hotel. Wiseman is the first documentary filmmaker to ever receive this honor, according to the critics group. After being trained as an attorney, Wiseman turned to documentary filmmaking, first as a producer on 1964's "The Cool World," then as a director on the award-winning 1967 film "Titicut Follies," about the patient inmates at the Bridgewater State Hospital for the criminally insane in Massachusetts.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2010
No one needs to be told the importance of Jean-Paul Belmondo, the great French actor of his generation and the star of films such as "Breathless," "Pierrot le Fou" and "That Man From Rio." The 76-year-old veteran rarely visits Los Angeles but he is here this weekend to receive the L.A. Film Critics Life Achievement Award and as part of his trip he has agreed to introduce the LACMA screening of "Mississippi Mermaid," the 1969 Francois Truffaut-directed film in which he costars with Catherine Deneuve.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2010 | By Katherine Tulich, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Actor Danny Huston recalls the first time he saw "The Treasure of the Sierra Madre." "I remember projecting it literally on a wall in Ireland as I was growing up. It was how I said hello to my grandfather," he says. That grandfather was the great character actor Walter Huston, who died before his grandson was born, and the film was directed by his legendary father, John Huston. The 1948 morality tale about a trio of greedy gold prospectors, which also starred Humphrey Bogart, is one of the films that Huston and his sister, actress Anjelica Huston, will be presenting at the inaugural TCM Classic Film Festival, kicking off Thursday in Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2009 | KENNETH TURAN, FILM CRITIC
With his trademark ability to blend austerity with emotion, especially in underworld films such as "Le Doulos" and "Le Samouraï," the late French director Jean-Pierre Melville has become a cinephile favorite. Now, 1961's "Léon Morin, Priest," a film that's at once similar to his classics and significantly different from them, is getting an American release. Playing tonight and Saturday night only at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art's Bing Theater, "Léon Morin" is set, like several Melville films (most notably "Army of Shadows")
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
After 27 years and hundreds of parts in films, Jean-Paul Belmondo has returned to the stage for a series of performances in Paris. Belmondo, who has dangled from a helicopter over Paris, crawled across the roof of a moving subway car in pursuit of a murderer and frolicked with a Bengal tiger for the motion-picture camera, said: "I feel like a fighter going into the ring," after opening in "Kean." The five-act play by Alexandre Dumas was adapted by Jean-Paul Sartre in 1953.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2012 | By Susan King
The Los Angeles Film Critics Assn. has named renowned documentary filmmaker Frederick Wiseman  the recipient of the group's career achievement award. The 82-year-old Emmy-winning documentarian will receive the award at a ceremony Jan. 12 at the Intercontinental Hotel. Wiseman is the first documentary filmmaker to ever receive this honor, according to the critics group. After being trained as an attorney, Wiseman turned to documentary filmmaking, first as a producer on 1964's "The Cool World," then as a director on the award-winning 1967 film "Titicut Follies," about the patient inmates at the Bridgewater State Hospital for the criminally insane in Massachusetts.
BOOKS
August 9, 1998 | CAROLYN SEE, Carolyn See is the author of "Dreaming: Hard Luck and Good Times in America." Her forthcoming novel, "The Handyman," will be published by Random House in March
When Andrei Makine's "Dreams of My Russian Summers" was published in America last year, it met with well-deserved acclaim. In these pages, Thomas McGonigle called it "one of the great autobiographical novels of this century." Now, in 1998, we have Makine's "Once Upon the River Love," but its European copyright, 1996, is a year earlier than "Russian Summers,' " and in many ways it reads like a rough draft of that "great autobiographical book."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2010
No one needs to be told the importance of Jean-Paul Belmondo, the great French actor of his generation and the star of films such as "Breathless," "Pierrot le Fou" and "That Man From Rio." The 76-year-old veteran rarely visits Los Angeles but he is here this weekend to receive the L.A. Film Critics Life Achievement Award and as part of his trip he has agreed to introduce the LACMA screening of "Mississippi Mermaid," the 1969 Francois Truffaut-directed film in which he costars with Catherine Deneuve.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2009 | KENNETH TURAN, FILM CRITIC
With his trademark ability to blend austerity with emotion, especially in underworld films such as "Le Doulos" and "Le Samouraï," the late French director Jean-Pierre Melville has become a cinephile favorite. Now, 1961's "Léon Morin, Priest," a film that's at once similar to his classics and significantly different from them, is getting an American release. Playing tonight and Saturday night only at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art's Bing Theater, "Léon Morin" is set, like several Melville films (most notably "Army of Shadows")
BOOKS
August 9, 1998 | CAROLYN SEE, Carolyn See is the author of "Dreaming: Hard Luck and Good Times in America." Her forthcoming novel, "The Handyman," will be published by Random House in March
When Andrei Makine's "Dreams of My Russian Summers" was published in America last year, it met with well-deserved acclaim. In these pages, Thomas McGonigle called it "one of the great autobiographical novels of this century." Now, in 1998, we have Makine's "Once Upon the River Love," but its European copyright, 1996, is a year earlier than "Russian Summers,' " and in many ways it reads like a rough draft of that "great autobiographical book."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1990 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When "Cyrano de Bergerac" was first performed on the stage in Paris in 1897, it so impressed a government minister in the audience that he summoned the author, Edmond Rostand, to his balcony loge during the scene change before the final act.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2010 | By Katherine Tulich, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Actor Danny Huston recalls the first time he saw "The Treasure of the Sierra Madre." "I remember projecting it literally on a wall in Ireland as I was growing up. It was how I said hello to my grandfather," he says. That grandfather was the great character actor Walter Huston, who died before his grandson was born, and the film was directed by his legendary father, John Huston. The 1948 morality tale about a trio of greedy gold prospectors, which also starred Humphrey Bogart, is one of the films that Huston and his sister, actress Anjelica Huston, will be presenting at the inaugural TCM Classic Film Festival, kicking off Thursday in Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1999
Bonjour! Didn't anyone on your staff study French? In your timeline mention of the 1960 film "Breathless" ("Defining Moments of the 20th Century," Oct. 3), not only do you have Jean-Paul Belmondo running out of souffle rather than breath (souffle), you have him smoking a Welsh girl (Galoise) rather than a cigarette (Gauloise). DIANE WARE Laguna Beach
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
After 27 years and hundreds of parts in films, Jean-Paul Belmondo has returned to the stage for a series of performances in Paris. Belmondo, who has dangled from a helicopter over Paris, crawled across the roof of a moving subway car in pursuit of a murderer and frolicked with a Bengal tiger for the motion-picture camera, said: "I feel like a fighter going into the ring," after opening in "Kean." The five-act play by Alexandre Dumas was adapted by Jean-Paul Sartre in 1953.
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