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Jean Paul Fouchecourt

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2001 | CHRIS PASLES
Choreographer Mark Morris' lively staging of Rameau's comic opera, "Platee," will open the Eclectic Orange Festival 2001 on Sept. 28-29 at the Orange County Performing Arts Center in Costa Mesa. Rameau's 18th-century opera-ballet will be presented by the Philharmonic Society of Orange County in association with Opera Pacific. French tenor Jean-Paul Fouchecourt, who created the role for Morris' production at the 1997 Edinburgh Festival, will sing Platee.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2001 | SHAUNA SNOW
VISUAL ART Ransom Demand: Armed robbers who stole a Rembrandt and two Renoirs from the Swedish National Museum a few days before Christmas have written the museum demanding an undisclosed ransom for the pictures, valued at nearly $30 million. Photographs of the paintings--a small Rembrandt self-portrait from 1630 and Renoir's late-19th century "Young Parisian" and "Conversation"--accompanied the letter.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1998 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
The early-music movement is a police state without a complete set of laws. Its adherents, like survivors of a nuclear holocaust attempting to recapture a lost civilization, follow whatever regulations they can piece together from surviving documents. They can be resourceful, building their own harpsichords and reconstructing the meaning of forgotten notation. They can even do an imaginative job of conjuring up the past.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2001 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
It's not easy being green. And two centuries before Kermit the Frog dramatized that underreported existential predicament, a Baroque swamp thing named Platee made it indelible by waddling across the stages of Versailles and Paris in a satiric opera named after her. And what an opera.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 1999 | MARK SWED, Mark Swed is The Times' music critic
Although our date books forecast the impending conclusion of the so-called modern century, we still puzzle over its beginning. When and how did we first become modern? Art critic Clement Greenberg pointed to Paris in the middle of the 19th century, claiming that Manet, Flaubert and Baudelaire started it all by boldly breaking the mold of Romanticism. Others, drawn to Vienna at the turn of the century, are happy with the calendar.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2001 | PATRICK PACHECO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In "A Night at the Opera," Groucho Marx says of the social-climbing Margaret Dumont, whom he is trying to seduce as well as defraud, "As incredible as it seems, Mrs. Claypool isn't as big a sap as she looks. How's that for lovemaking?" Mark Morris, the adventurous Manhattan-based director and choreographer, appears to have gone one better than the Marx Brothers with his night at the opera, "Platee," a raucous and zany interpretation of an 18th century comic opera by Jean-Philippe Rameau.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1999
General Categories * Record of the Year: "The Boy Is Mine," Brandy & Monica (Dallas Austin, Brandy and Rodney Jerkins, producers; Leslie Brathwalte, Ben Garrison, Rodney Jerkins and Dexter Simmons, engineers/mixers); "My Heart Will Go On," Celine Dion (Walter Afanasieff and James Horner, producers; Humberto Gatica and David Gleeson, engineers/mixers); "Iris," Goo Goo Dolls (Rob Cavallo and Goo Goo Dolls, producers; Jack Joseph Puig and Allen Sides, engineers/mixers); "Ray of Light," Madonna
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