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Jean Philippe Collard

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1988 | JOHN HENKEN
It was onward and upward for the Muir String Quartet Sunday afternoon, as its Coleman Series program at Beckman Auditorium moved from an erratic warm-up through stolid respectability to substantial glory. Credit Cesar Franck and pianist Jean-Philippe Collard for the change from prosaic craft to exhilarating art. Both of the quartet's recordings have been award-winning collaborations with Collard in French repertory, and the combination proved coolly stunning Sunday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1995 | TIMOTHY MANGAN
Jean-Philippe Collard is a pianist who comes right at you. Forget the circuitous routes of reverie and elegance; forget wafting perfumes, delicate nuances and dappled colors. Think bright, brash, clear and forward. But this much-recorded French musician is not without art. There were subtleties in his recital Wednesday night in Bing Theater at the L.A. County Art Museum; they just weren't generally of the poetic variety, even where one might expect it, as in the music of Poulenc and Faure.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1995 | TIMOTHY MANGAN
Jean-Philippe Collard is a pianist who comes right at you. Forget the circuitous routes of reverie and elegance; forget wafting perfumes, delicate nuances and dappled colors. Think bright, brash, clear and forward. But this much-recorded French musician is not without art. There were subtleties in his recital Wednesday night in Bing Theater at the L.A. County Art Museum; they just weren't generally of the poetic variety, even where one might expect it, as in the music of Poulenc and Faure.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1988 | JOHN HENKEN
It was onward and upward for the Muir String Quartet Sunday afternoon, as its Coleman Series program at Beckman Auditorium moved from an erratic warm-up through stolid respectability to substantial glory. Credit Cesar Franck and pianist Jean-Philippe Collard for the change from prosaic craft to exhilarating art. Both of the quartet's recordings have been award-winning collaborations with Collard in French repertory, and the combination proved coolly stunning Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2000 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
The Pacific Symphony this week officially began its 2000-01 season, Carl St.Clair's 11th as music director, with a relatively modest, quasi-pops program Wednesday night at the Orange County Performing Arts Center. Its modesty may have something to do with the fact that next week, the orchestra will open Orange County's Eclectic Orange Festival with the West Coast premiere of Philip Glass' Fifth Symphony. Still, the evening was generally brilliant and festive too.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2000 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A weeklong festival devoted to the beloved American composer Aaron Copland and the West Coast premiere of Richard Danielpour's "Voices of Remembrance"--a memorial to three slain national leaders--will highlight the Pacific Symphony's 2000-01 season. Music director Carl St.Clair will conduct Copland's "Fanfare for the Common Man" and "Lincoln Portrait," among other works, as part of a festival of films, lectures and concerts honoring the Copland centenary Nov. 12-19. Details will be announced.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1991 | DANIEL CARIAGA
As he has proved in at least eight visits since his debut here in 1978, Jean-Philippe Collard is a pianist of so many admirable qualities that one always regrets finding his performances mystifying. Returning Thursday, the French musician brought another challenging program, and mystified again. Marsee Auditorium at the South Bay Center for the Arts drew a large number of Collard fans for this recital of music by Faure, Ravel and Chopin. By and large, they should not have been disappointed.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1992 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
With quiet authority, extraordinary strength and delicacy and a tone-production that never grates, Jean-Philippe Collard plays the piano with the ease and confidence of one born to make music. He seems to be a virtuoso without ego. The French musician, a longtime visitor to Southern California, returned to Ambassador Auditorium this week to demonstrate again his many skills in a provocative program. This time, his agenda combined a Lisztian first half--the "Sonetto del Petrarca No.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2000 | By STEVEN LINAN and CHRIS PASLES and MIKE BOEHM
MUSIC More Connections: The Pacific Symphony will expand its Classical Connections Series from three to four Saturday concerts during the 2000-01 season. Now in its sixth season, the series offers informal 90-minute concerts in which music director Carl St.Clair talks about the works to be played and illustrates them with musical examples. All concerts begin at 3:30 p.m. at the Orange County Performing Arts Center, 600 Town Center Drive, in Costa Mesa. The series: * Oct.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 2000 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pianist Jean-Philippe Collard will tell you how difficult it is to make music on the instrument. "The piano is a strange sound. It's not very pure. You have a hammer. It's very hard. It's not a good way to make music, with a hammer. A violin has a wonderful sound; it's natural. A piano--hammers, every day hammers. It's ugly. So you have to correct, to change, to sing."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1989 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, Times Music Critic
Strange happenings at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. Andre Previn and the Los Angeles Philharmonic had scheduled a world premiere on Thursday: Robert Erickson's "Corona," completed in 1986. They ended up offering only a portion of a world premiere. Although the management deemed the action worthy of neither a public announcement nor an official explanation, Previn had cut the work drastically at the last moment. How much he cut remained a mystery for a while.
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