Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJean Pierre
IN THE NEWS

Jean Pierre

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 19, 1990 | BOB SECTER and TRACY SHRYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A judge Wednesday refused to order 3-year-old twins to undergo tests to determine whether they could become bone marrow donors for a gravely ill half-brother. Such an order would be an invasion of the twins' constitutional right to privacy, Cook County Circuit Judge Monica Reynolds said. The ruling was made in a suit brought by Tamas Bosze, the father of all three youngsters, in an attempt to save the life of his 12-year-old son, Jean Pierre, who suffers from leukemia.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
American culture was more than a fascination for Jean-Pierre Melville; it was a defining component of the French director's persona and life's work. There was the surname he adopted, the Stetson hats he favored, the Cadillac he piloted through the streets of Paris. Above all, there was the hard-boiled sensibility of gangster movies from the 1930s and '40s, an attitude he polished into a new cinematic minimalism, bone-cold and bittersweet. Melville got to exercise his vision stateside only twice.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Jean-Pierre Moueix, a leading wine merchant and owner of Chateau Petrus in the Bordeaux area of France, died March 28 at his home in Libourne, France. He was 89.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Film Critic
The air of compelling melancholy that hangs over all of Jean-Pierre Melville's classic policiers is especially inescapable while watching his 1972 "Un Flic. " This was the last film the director finished before dying of a heart attack at age 55, and it has many of the traits that have made him a favorite for fans of crime films in general and the French variety in particular. Melville had a celebrated cameo in Jean-Luc Godard's "Breathless," playing the literary celebrity interviewed by Jean Seberg who says his ambition is "to become immortal and die," a state his 13 films, including such gems as "Le Samuraï," "Army of Shadows" and "Bob le Flambeur," have enabled him to achieve.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1989 | GREG HETTMANSBERGER
Jean-Pierre Rampal's program Sunday night at Royce Hall listed a variety of Baroque and Classical works for flute accompanied by harpsichord or fortepiano. Before the evening was out, the modern keyboard descendant of those instruments made an unscheduled appearance. Assisted at the harpsichord by his longtime associate John Steele Ritter, Rampal opened with compositions by Rameau ("Troisieme Concert," in A), J.S.
NEWS
November 6, 1988 | Associated Press
Jean-Pierre Stirbois, the No. 2 man in the extreme-right National Front after party leader Jean-Marie Le Pen, died Saturday in an automobile accident, police said. He was 43. Stirbois attended a political meeting on Friday in the city of Dreux, about 60 miles west of Paris, and was traveling toward the capital when his car ran off the road and smashed into a tree at about 2:40 a.m, police said. Stirbois was secretary-general of the National Front and a member of the party leadership since 1981.
NEWS
February 21, 1996
Jean-Pierre Marie Herve-Bazin, 84, the novelist and overseer of France's top literary prize. Called Herve Bazin, the writer was known for his acid novels about youthful rebellion inspired by his own experiences. His first novel, "A Viper in the Fist," published in 1948, became his best-known work. His other books included "Death of the Little Horse" and "Head Against the Wall," which was based on his stay in a psychiatric hospital for amnesia.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1986 | JOHN HENKEN
When Jean-Pierre Rampal began his career, great things were predicted for the future of the flute. But individual charisma and technique have accomplished only so much--where is the repertory? Rampal's latest local recital, Monday evening, sponsored by the Los Angeles Philharmonic, featured violin sonatas and other arrangements, plus bonbons. And nothing more recent than a Joplin rag, offered in encore.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1985 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER
Jean-Pierre Ponnelle used to be regarded as an enfant terrible . He staged and designed opera productions that often ignored or distorted the specific instructions of the composer and librettist. He didn't mind taking certain narrative liberties in quest of dramatic truth. He hated cliches. He despised concerts in costume. He abhorred star egos. He constantly probed for new images and metaphors to illuminate old rituals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Jean-Pierre Cassel, a celebrated French actor who rose to fame in the 1960s with comedies such as "Les Jeux de l'Amour" and "Le Farceur," both by Philippe de Broca, has died. He was 74. Cassel died Thursday in Paris, according to his agent, Isabelle Gaudin. The actor, whose skills as a tap dancer won him comparisons to Fred Astaire, was among his country's most beloved and versatile performers.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2012 | By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The latest release in the Criterion Collection's Eclipse series, a mid-price line devoted to overlooked auteurs, is titled, with tongue slightly in cheek, "Three Popular Films by Jean-Pierre Gorin. " Obscure by most measures, these eccentric, rarely seen documentaries are popular in a more modest and profound sense — they are, as the writer Kent Jones' eloquent liner notes point out, "of the people," which is to say, endlessly interested in individual experience and idiosyncrasy, fully alert to the tragicomedy of human complexity and contradiction.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2011 | By Devorah Lauter, Special to the Los Angeles Times
François Bon knows about the hidden cemetery just behind the Grande Arche, a minimalist monument to modernity that looms over France's version of Wall Street, or La Défense . The decision to surround the office buildings in one of Europe's largest financial hubs with headstones was later viewed as distasteful, and trees were planted to cover them. Now, some employees says Bon, eat sandwiches while sitting on the tombs. Nearby, Bon also knows where to take an elevator that will leave a person lost in an endless expanse of deserted parking lots eight stories below ground.
IMAGE
October 24, 2010 | By Jean-Pierre Dorléac, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Emmy-winning and Oscar-nominated Hollywood costume designer Jean-Pierre Dorléac was mentored by the legendary Edith Head, who died 29 years ago today. He is frustrated by long-standing accounts that credit Givenchy with the classic black H-neckline dress worn by Audrey Hepburn in "Sabrina" ["Impressions of a Legend," Oct. 3]. Here, from his memoir-in-progress, Dorléac gives Head her say on the controversy: Secondhand accounts can ruin someone's reputation as much as malicious rumors.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
It means no disrespect to the talented French team of director Agnès Jaoui and her writing partner Jean-Pierre Bacri to say they started their film careers as actors and that their latest effort, "Let It Rain," makes that fact evident. For both this feature and its predecessors, "Look at Me" and the Oscar-nominated "The Taste of Others," are characterized by splendid dialogue and rich, juicy roles for performers, Jaoui and Bacri first among them. A film that features exceptionally well-drawn characters and inspired moments if not necessarily a tightly focused plot, "Let It Rain" shows how well you can do if you have an exact sense of what good actors need to do their best.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
As director Jean-Pierre Jeunet can testify, inspiration can often first be found in adversity. After making the lengthy drama "A Very Long Engagement," which reunited him with his "Amelie" star Audrey Tautou in 2004, the French filmmaker spent two years of his life in pre-production on "The Life of Pi," based on the bestselling book by Yann Martel, for 20th Century Fox. "I wrote the script," says the burly 56-year-old filmmaker during a...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2009 | KENNETH TURAN, FILM CRITIC
With his trademark ability to blend austerity with emotion, especially in underworld films such as "Le Doulos" and "Le Samouraï," the late French director Jean-Pierre Melville has become a cinephile favorite. Now, 1961's "Léon Morin, Priest," a film that's at once similar to his classics and significantly different from them, is getting an American release. Playing tonight and Saturday night only at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art's Bing Theater, "Léon Morin" is set, like several Melville films (most notably "Army of Shadows")
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2002 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Jean-Pierre Perreault, 55, an award-winning Canadian choreographer who once described his approach to creating dances as that of "a drowning man who fights for survival," died Tuesday of cancer at Notre Dame Hospital in Montreal. Perreault is best-known for his 65-minute, unaccompanied 1983 modern dance spectacle "Joe," which reached Los Angeles in 1996.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2009 | Mark Olsen
The works of Belgian filmmakers Luc and Jean-Pierre Dardenne follow the hardscrabble struggles of lower-class life so relentlessly that they might seem like textbook examples of arduously difficult, obtusely unfun European art cinema. Yet their films are made with such restless energy, hurtling headlong and recklessly through their exactingly portrayed worlds, that they often feel more like crackerjack thrillers. So which is it?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Jean-Pierre Cassel, a celebrated French actor who rose to fame in the 1960s with comedies such as "Les Jeux de l'Amour" and "Le Farceur," both by Philippe de Broca, has died. He was 74. Cassel died Thursday in Paris, according to his agent, Isabelle Gaudin. The actor, whose skills as a tap dancer won him comparisons to Fred Astaire, was among his country's most beloved and versatile performers.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|