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Jean Pierre Boccara

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1988 | MICHAEL ARKUSH
A playground is coming to West Los Angeles, and it has nothing to do with swings and sandboxes. Beginning Aug. 9, Crayons Bar & Grille will inaugurate a new weekly event, entitled "The Playground." The brainchild of promoter Matthew Jackson, it is an attempt to go beyond the routine night at West Side clubs. Jackson said each Tuesday night will feature a disc jockey instead of the nightly live bands.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1989 | DOUGLAS SADOWNICK
It may not have been the Copacabana or Rick's in "Casablanca," but the Lhasa Club was the closest thing '80s Los Angeles had to a prewar German night club-cum-cabaret. It was a holdout, a place where straight and gay poets, punks and performance artists mingled during the early Reagan days that some artists would call "Mourning in America."
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1989 | DOUGLAS SADOWNICK
It may not have been the Copacabana or Rick's in "Casablanca," but the Lhasa Club was the closest thing '80s Los Angeles had to a prewar German night club-cum-cabaret. It was a holdout, a place where straight and gay poets, punks and performance artists mingled during the early Reagan days that some artists would call "Mourning in America."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1988 | MICHAEL ARKUSH
A playground is coming to West Los Angeles, and it has nothing to do with swings and sandboxes. Beginning Aug. 9, Crayons Bar & Grille will inaugurate a new weekly event, entitled "The Playground." The brainchild of promoter Matthew Jackson, it is an attempt to go beyond the routine night at West Side clubs. Jackson said each Tuesday night will feature a disc jockey instead of the nightly live bands.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1994 | HEIDI SIEGMUND
In the ten months since L.A. club veteran Jean-Pierre Boccara opened his latest night-life venture, West Hollywood's LunaPark, the Parisian entrepreneur has consistently given club-goers an elegant and eclectic night out. Despite the hoopla that accompanies a new "scene" in L.A., LunaPark has managed to maintain a trendy, chic atmosphere without the snobbery that plagues too many Westside clubs.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1988 | MICHAEL ARKUSH
Santiago Jimenez Jr. doesn't have an identity crisis--his audience does. "They confuse me with my brother," said Jimenez, whose brother, Flaco, has toured with Ry Cooder and recorded with Dwight Yoakam. "When I get to the microphone, I explain to the audience who Flaco is, and who I am." Santiago will get another chance to clear up the confusion when he performs Sept. 17 at McCabe's in Santa Monica.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1986 | STEVE HOCHMAN
What bands are out there on the horizon, ready to follow in the footsteps of X, the Go-Go's, Lone Justice, Wall of Voodoo and other graduates of the L.A. rock scene? The people who book the talent at some of L.A.'s major clubs survey the field and make their picks for the stars of the future. Thelonious Monster (Brendan Mullen, Lingerie: "I don't know how far they could go, but it's something interesting to watch.") Piano Moscow (Jim Van Tyne, Anticlub: "They're real good, unpretentious.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1988 | MICHAEL ARKUSH
Four years ago, Robyn Rosenkrantz's older sister and her best friend were killed in a Palm Springs car accident caused by a drunken driver. First, there was the depression; then, the renewed dedication. Rosenkrantz, a Sepulveda singer and songwriter, has written and produced a new music video, "Innocent," to raise public consciousness about the danger of drinking and driving. Along with Howard Kaminsky, she also does the singing.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1989 | MICHAEL ARKUSH
For a decade, Venice labored as just another Los Angeles rock 'n' roll group with a good following but no opportunity to move beyond the local club scene. Now they have a chance to take their music to the next level. Last week, Venice entered the studio to record its first album for Modern/Atlantic Records. The band, a socially conscious group heavily influenced by the R&B sound of the early 1970s, should spend about two months recording 12 songs.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1989 | MICHAEL ARKUSH
The tribute to Ritchie Valens at the Country Club in Reseda raised more than $6,000 for music classes and scholarships on his behalf, according to Salvador Guitarez, who organized last weekend's event. About 400 tickets at $15 each were sold for the benefit, with the money going to underprivileged youth in San Fernando and Pacoima, Guitarez said. The Ritchie Valens Committee is scheduled to meet this month to discuss how the funds will be distributed. Among community organizations likely to benefit are Pacoima Junior High School, San Fernando High School and the Pacoima Boys & Girls Club.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1988 | MICHAEL ARKUSH
Beginning early next year, North Hollywood's FM Station may play host to a weekly television show showcasing local bands, said owner Filthy McNasty. McNasty would not say which network would broadcast the show--"FM Station Live." He said each week would feature four bands, playing anything from hard rock to country. "It will be an event each week," McNasty said. "There will be no judging, no comments. We'll just let them play."
NEWS
December 19, 1993 | MARK EHRMAN
At 15 Minutes--a haute camp "Star Search" hosted by overly ample drag princess Jackie Beat and her trim sidekick, Rusty Updegraff--anything can happen. One contestant, Chris Marr, peels off his leopard-patterned pants, partially revealing underwear, while he croons Cole Porter's "Love for Sale." Members of the audience, fully exploiting the fuzziness of the boundary between performers and spectators, fling coins on stage. The evening's judges rate the performance 8.5, 6.5 and 7.7.
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