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Jean Pierre Jeunet

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November 14, 2004 | Kristin Hohenadel, Special to The Times
It is rare for a French director to storyboard a whole film -- most use them to draft complicated action sequences, if at all. But Jean-Pierre Jeunet, whose international hit "Amelie" reimagined Paris in a dreamy light and employed unprecedented special effects for a French movie, can't start shooting until he has a storyboard for every intricate vision in his head.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2013 | By David Ng
The director of the 2001 French movie "Amélie" has expressed his displeasure over the planned adaptation of his movie for the musical theater, although he acknowledged that he gave his approval for the stage production. Jean-Pierre Jeunet said in a recent interview with a French radio station that the prospect of a musical version of his movie "disgusts me," and that he only agreed to it for the money, which he plans to give to a children's charity he helps support: Mécénat Chirurgie Cardiaque (Patronage for Cardiac Surgery)
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2001 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Amelie" is what happens when a filmmaker with nasty habits tries to make nice. It's very much of a sometime thing. The filmmaker is Frenchman Jean-Pierre Jeunet, responsible for the distinctly unpleasant trio of "Alien: Resurrection," "The City of Lost Children" and "Delicatessen" (the last two with collaborator Marc Caro). "I suddenly realized that I'd never made a truly positive film," Jeunet has explained.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2011
UNDERRATED Apex Manor's 'The Year of Magical Drinking': Led by singer-guitarist Ross Flournoy, the Americana-dusted local band the Broken West was one of the most promising lights on the local scene a few years ago. After a lengthy period of writer's block, Flournoy makes a welcome return with this batch of Beatles-esque melodies and classic songcraft. Start with "Under the Gun," a blast of golden-hour guitar-pop warm enough to match our unseasonable winter. ' Skippy Dies: A Novel': Don't let the nearly 700-page heft of this story by Irish writer Paul Murray scare you. Surrounding the life of a doomed 14-year-old student at a Dublin prep school, the book covers string theory, Gaelic mythology and fumbling through growing up in the modern age with a uniquely Irish mix of biting wit and romantic pathos.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2004 | Susan King
It is no wonder French actress Audrey Tautou was described as the "new" Audrey Hepburn three years ago when she shot to international fame as the whimsical title character in Jean-Pierre Jeunet's fanciful comedy, "Amelie." The 26-year-old has the same big, expressive dark eyes as Hepburn and, like the late actress, is a wafer-thin gamin.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2011
UNDERRATED Apex Manor's 'The Year of Magical Drinking': Led by singer-guitarist Ross Flournoy, the Americana-dusted local band the Broken West was one of the most promising lights on the local scene a few years ago. After a lengthy period of writer's block, Flournoy makes a welcome return with this batch of Beatles-esque melodies and classic songcraft. Start with "Under the Gun," a blast of golden-hour guitar-pop warm enough to match our unseasonable winter. ' Skippy Dies: A Novel': Don't let the nearly 700-page heft of this story by Irish writer Paul Murray scare you. Surrounding the life of a doomed 14-year-old student at a Dublin prep school, the book covers string theory, Gaelic mythology and fumbling through growing up in the modern age with a uniquely Irish mix of biting wit and romantic pathos.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2013 | By David Ng
The director of the 2001 French movie "Amélie" has expressed his displeasure over the planned adaptation of his movie for the musical theater, although he acknowledged that he gave his approval for the stage production. Jean-Pierre Jeunet said in a recent interview with a French radio station that the prospect of a musical version of his movie "disgusts me," and that he only agreed to it for the money, which he plans to give to a children's charity he helps support: Mécénat Chirurgie Cardiaque (Patronage for Cardiac Surgery)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1995 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a regular contributor to Calendar
In their spectacular debut film of 1991, "Delicatessen," the French filmmaking team of Jean-Pierre Jeunet and Marc Caro invented their own universe. A nightmarish dystopia similar to those evoked in Ridley Scott's "Blade Runner," and Terry Gilliam's "Brazil," "Delicatessen" takes place in a condemned apartment building where cannibalism is the order of the day, a tenant lives in a flooded basement where he grows and eats snails, and never a shard of sunlight pierces the gloomy sky.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
As director Jean-Pierre Jeunet can testify, inspiration can often first be found in adversity. After making the lengthy drama "A Very Long Engagement," which reunited him with his "Amelie" star Audrey Tautou in 2004, the French filmmaker spent two years of his life in pre-production on "The Life of Pi," based on the bestselling book by Yann Martel, for 20th Century Fox. "I wrote the script," says the burly 56-year-old filmmaker during a...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2004 | Sophie Tetrel, Associated Press
Never mind that Jean-Pierre Jeunet's new film is a French story filmed in the French language featuring one of France's biggest actresses. A Paris court has ruled that "Un Long Dimanche de Fiancailles" (A Very Long Engagement), which opened Friday in the United States, is too American to compete in French film festivals -- because of its Warner Bros. backing.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
As director Jean-Pierre Jeunet can testify, inspiration can often first be found in adversity. After making the lengthy drama "A Very Long Engagement," which reunited him with his "Amelie" star Audrey Tautou in 2004, the French filmmaker spent two years of his life in pre-production on "The Life of Pi," based on the bestselling book by Yann Martel, for 20th Century Fox. "I wrote the script," says the burly 56-year-old filmmaker during a...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2004 | Susan King
It is no wonder French actress Audrey Tautou was described as the "new" Audrey Hepburn three years ago when she shot to international fame as the whimsical title character in Jean-Pierre Jeunet's fanciful comedy, "Amelie." The 26-year-old has the same big, expressive dark eyes as Hepburn and, like the late actress, is a wafer-thin gamin.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2004 | Kristin Hohenadel, Special to The Times
It took French director Jean-Pierre Jeunet 12 years to find the means to make his new film, "A Very Long Engagement," based on the bestselling novel by Sebastien Japrisot. Set in France during World War I, it is an epic love story about Mathilde (Audrey Tautou), a young Breton woman who refuses to believe that her beloved Manech (Gaspard Ulliel) has died in the trenches. "It's a story about love, tenacity and hope," says the soft-spoken, down-to-earth Jeunet. "I've realized that ...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2004 | Sophie Tetrel, Associated Press
Never mind that Jean-Pierre Jeunet's new film is a French story filmed in the French language featuring one of France's biggest actresses. A Paris court has ruled that "Un Long Dimanche de Fiancailles" (A Very Long Engagement), which opened Friday in the United States, is too American to compete in French film festivals -- because of its Warner Bros. backing.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2004 | Kristin Hohenadel, Special to The Times
It is rare for a French director to storyboard a whole film -- most use them to draft complicated action sequences, if at all. But Jean-Pierre Jeunet, whose international hit "Amelie" reimagined Paris in a dreamy light and employed unprecedented special effects for a French movie, can't start shooting until he has a storyboard for every intricate vision in his head.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2001 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Amelie" is what happens when a filmmaker with nasty habits tries to make nice. It's very much of a sometime thing. The filmmaker is Frenchman Jean-Pierre Jeunet, responsible for the distinctly unpleasant trio of "Alien: Resurrection," "The City of Lost Children" and "Delicatessen" (the last two with collaborator Marc Caro). "I suddenly realized that I'd never made a truly positive film," Jeunet has explained.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1997 | John Clark, John Clark is a frequent contributor to Calendar
In a loft in lower Manhattan, actresses Winona Ryder and Sigourney Weaver are parading around in various stages of undress. It's all very professional. There's catering to keep them fed, publicists to keep them happy and music to keep them loose. They're doing a photo shoot to promote their new movie, Jean-Pierre Jeunet's "Alien Resurrection."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2004 | Kristin Hohenadel, Special to The Times
It took French director Jean-Pierre Jeunet 12 years to find the means to make his new film, "A Very Long Engagement," based on the bestselling novel by Sebastien Japrisot. Set in France during World War I, it is an epic love story about Mathilde (Audrey Tautou), a young Breton woman who refuses to believe that her beloved Manech (Gaspard Ulliel) has died in the trenches. "It's a story about love, tenacity and hope," says the soft-spoken, down-to-earth Jeunet. "I've realized that ...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1997 | John Clark, John Clark is a frequent contributor to Calendar
In a loft in lower Manhattan, actresses Winona Ryder and Sigourney Weaver are parading around in various stages of undress. It's all very professional. There's catering to keep them fed, publicists to keep them happy and music to keep them loose. They're doing a photo shoot to promote their new movie, Jean-Pierre Jeunet's "Alien Resurrection."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1995 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a regular contributor to Calendar
In their spectacular debut film of 1991, "Delicatessen," the French filmmaking team of Jean-Pierre Jeunet and Marc Caro invented their own universe. A nightmarish dystopia similar to those evoked in Ridley Scott's "Blade Runner," and Terry Gilliam's "Brazil," "Delicatessen" takes place in a condemned apartment building where cannibalism is the order of the day, a tenant lives in a flooded basement where he grows and eats snails, and never a shard of sunlight pierces the gloomy sky.
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