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Jean Pierre Melville

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1987 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
Jean-Pierre Melville is one of the most peculiar figures in French cinema. A devotee of American films, and possibly one of the top scholars on Hollywood movies of the '30s-'50s, Melville was highly influenced by their techniques and "language"--most particularly the style of film noir.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
American culture was more than a fascination for Jean-Pierre Melville; it was a defining component of the French director's persona and life's work. There was the surname he adopted, the Stetson hats he favored, the Cadillac he piloted through the streets of Paris. Above all, there was the hard-boiled sensibility of gangster movies from the 1930s and '40s, an attitude he polished into a new cinematic minimalism, bone-cold and bittersweet. Melville got to exercise his vision stateside only twice.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1996 | Kenneth Turan, Kenneth Turan is The Times' film critic
If French director Jean-Pierre Melville is known to American audiences at all, it is for his cameo role in Jean-Luc Godard's "Breathless," playing the literary celebrity interviewed by Jean Seberg at Orly Airport. "What is your greatest ambition?" she asks. His reply: "To become immortal and then to die." It has been more than two decades since Melville himself died of a heart attack at 55, and like his "Breathless" character, he has achieved immortality--but of a particular kind.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Film Critic
The air of compelling melancholy that hangs over all of Jean-Pierre Melville's classic policiers is especially inescapable while watching his 1972 "Un Flic. " This was the last film the director finished before dying of a heart attack at age 55, and it has many of the traits that have made him a favorite for fans of crime films in general and the French variety in particular. Melville had a celebrated cameo in Jean-Luc Godard's "Breathless," playing the literary celebrity interviewed by Jean Seberg who says his ambition is "to become immortal and die," a state his 13 films, including such gems as "Le Samuraï," "Army of Shadows" and "Bob le Flambeur," have enabled him to achieve.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2009 | KENNETH TURAN, FILM CRITIC
With his trademark ability to blend austerity with emotion, especially in underworld films such as "Le Doulos" and "Le Samouraï," the late French director Jean-Pierre Melville has become a cinephile favorite. Now, 1961's "Léon Morin, Priest," a film that's at once similar to his classics and significantly different from them, is getting an American release. Playing tonight and Saturday night only at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art's Bing Theater, "Léon Morin" is set, like several Melville films (most notably "Army of Shadows")
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Film Critic
The air of compelling melancholy that hangs over all of Jean-Pierre Melville's classic policiers is especially inescapable while watching his 1972 "Un Flic. " This was the last film the director finished before dying of a heart attack at age 55, and it has many of the traits that have made him a favorite for fans of crime films in general and the French variety in particular. Melville had a celebrated cameo in Jean-Luc Godard's "Breathless," playing the literary celebrity interviewed by Jean Seberg who says his ambition is "to become immortal and die," a state his 13 films, including such gems as "Le Samuraï," "Army of Shadows" and "Bob le Flambeur," have enabled him to achieve.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
American culture was more than a fascination for Jean-Pierre Melville; it was a defining component of the French director's persona and life's work. There was the surname he adopted, the Stetson hats he favored, the Cadillac he piloted through the streets of Paris. Above all, there was the hard-boiled sensibility of gangster movies from the 1930s and '40s, an attitude he polished into a new cinematic minimalism, bone-cold and bittersweet. Melville got to exercise his vision stateside only twice.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1997 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
With a Parisian hit man less emotional than a clock for a hero, Jean-Pierre Melville's "Le Samourai" is an austere poem of crime, a fatalistic exercise in myth-making and transcendent style. Repeatedly sold out when it served as the centerpiece of last year's American Cinematheque tribute to Melville, this rarely seen modern classic from France returns for a full one-week run in uncut 35-millimeter form at the Nuart in West Los Angeles starting Friday.
NEWS
April 25, 2002 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several new DVDs and videos have a distinct international flavor, showcasing films from France, Russia and even Iceland. New on DVD from Criterion is French director Jean-Pierre Melville's 1956 masterpiece "Bob Le Flambeur" ($30). This influential black-and-white film noir revolves around an aging gangster who spends most of his life in Paris gambling houses. Though he's been on the straight and narrow for several years, Bob plots one last caper: to rob the casino at Deauville.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2008 | Kenneth Turan
This week is an ideal one to check out the tremendous resource that is the UCLA Film and Television Archive, which screens films at the Billy Wilder Theater at the Hammer Museum in Westwood. Playing Friday night is a nifty pre-Code double bill, William Powell in "Street of Chance" and Lew Ayres in "Okay, America!" And Wednesday, as part of its "The Movie That Inspired Me" series, top cinematographer Roger Deakins talks to Curtis Hanson about Jean-Pierre Melville's masterful "Army of Shadows."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2009 | KENNETH TURAN, FILM CRITIC
With his trademark ability to blend austerity with emotion, especially in underworld films such as "Le Doulos" and "Le Samouraï," the late French director Jean-Pierre Melville has become a cinephile favorite. Now, 1961's "Léon Morin, Priest," a film that's at once similar to his classics and significantly different from them, is getting an American release. Playing tonight and Saturday night only at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art's Bing Theater, "Léon Morin" is set, like several Melville films (most notably "Army of Shadows")
NEWS
April 25, 2002 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several new DVDs and videos have a distinct international flavor, showcasing films from France, Russia and even Iceland. New on DVD from Criterion is French director Jean-Pierre Melville's 1956 masterpiece "Bob Le Flambeur" ($30). This influential black-and-white film noir revolves around an aging gangster who spends most of his life in Paris gambling houses. Though he's been on the straight and narrow for several years, Bob plots one last caper: to rob the casino at Deauville.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1997 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
With a Parisian hit man less emotional than a clock for a hero, Jean-Pierre Melville's "Le Samourai" is an austere poem of crime, a fatalistic exercise in myth-making and transcendent style. Repeatedly sold out when it served as the centerpiece of last year's American Cinematheque tribute to Melville, this rarely seen modern classic from France returns for a full one-week run in uncut 35-millimeter form at the Nuart in West Los Angeles starting Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1996 | Kenneth Turan, Kenneth Turan is The Times' film critic
If French director Jean-Pierre Melville is known to American audiences at all, it is for his cameo role in Jean-Luc Godard's "Breathless," playing the literary celebrity interviewed by Jean Seberg at Orly Airport. "What is your greatest ambition?" she asks. His reply: "To become immortal and then to die." It has been more than two decades since Melville himself died of a heart attack at 55, and like his "Breathless" character, he has achieved immortality--but of a particular kind.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1987 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
Jean-Pierre Melville is one of the most peculiar figures in French cinema. A devotee of American films, and possibly one of the top scholars on Hollywood movies of the '30s-'50s, Melville was highly influenced by their techniques and "language"--most particularly the style of film noir.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1996
The American Cinematheque kicks off a new weekly programming format May 3 at the Raleigh Studios Charlie Chaplin Theater, 5300 Melrose Ave., Hollywood. Series oriented film programs will be offered every Friday and Saturday evening and the Cinematheque's "The Alternative Screen: A Forum for Independent Film Exhibition & Beyond" series will be presented on the second and fourth Thursdays of each month.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2009 | Kenneth Turan
With the film series at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art heading into the sunset, this weekend and the next provide a chance to do three good things at once: (1) experience the soon-to-be-empty Leo S. Bing Theater, one of this city's great movie venues, (2) see some wonderful films -- "Being Jewish in France," a compelling documentary, from Friday to Sunday, and "Leon Morin, Priest," a rare Jean-Pierre Melville classic on Aug.
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