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Jean Pierre Melville

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Serge Silberman, 86, an independent French film producer whose credits include Akira Kurosawa's "Ran" and Luis Bunuel's Oscar-winning "The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie," died of undisclosed causes on July 22 in Paris. Born in Lodz (now Poland), Silberman survived the Nazi concentration camps and arrived in Paris in 1945. He launched his producing career in 1953 and founded the Greenwich Film Co. in 1966.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2008 | KEVIN CRUST
When Jean-Pierre Melville's film "Army of Shadows" was released in the U.S. in 2006, 37 years after being unjustly dismissed by French critics, it became an immediate classic. An almost clinical psychological study of the French Resistance during World War II (of which Melville was part), and based on Joseph Kessel's novel, it chronicles stoic day-to-day perseverance in the face of Nazi occupation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Jean-Pierre Cassel, a celebrated French actor who rose to fame in the 1960s with comedies such as "Les Jeux de l'Amour" and "Le Farceur," both by Philippe de Broca, has died. He was 74. Cassel died Thursday in Paris, according to his agent, Isabelle Gaudin. The actor, whose skills as a tap dancer won him comparisons to Fred Astaire, was among his country's most beloved and versatile performers.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2012 | By Mark Olsen
Matthias Schoenaerts broke through with art house audiences with the Belgian film "Bullhead," nominated earlier this year for an Academy Award for foreign-language film, playing a man still haunted by the traumas of his childhood. In the new "Rust and Bone," he again turns in a muscular, physical performance, but this time as a man more actively working to move forward with his life. Costarring with Marion Cotillard, Schoenaerts has garnered acclaim for his work in the film, including comparisons to Marlon Brando and Michael Fassbender.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2004 | Susan King
Although the gangster film came of age in America in the 1930s with such classics as "Public Enemy" with James Cagney, "Little Caesar" starring Edward G. Robinson, and Paul Muni in "Scarface," the genre quickly made its way across the Atlantic when French filmmakers realized these provocative movies could easily be given a Gallic sensibility. French cinema found its perfect gangster hero in tough-guy-with-a-heart Jean Gabin, who appeared in such films as "Pepe le Moko" and "Le Jour Se Leve."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2007 | Susan King
Rialto Pictures, an award-winning distributor of reissued films, has breathed new life into foreign film classics such as Jean Renoir's "Grand Illusion," Julien Duvivier's "Pepe le Moko" and Jean-Luc Godard's "Contempt," "Band of Outsiders" and "A Woman Is a Woman." One of its most recent theatrical reissues, Jean-Pierre Melville's "Army of Shadows," marked the first U.S. engagement of the 1969 French drama.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1988 | KEVIN THOMAS
In addition to the Filmforum's presentation of selections from the first Lesbian and Gay Experimental Film Festival on Monday at LACE--with another program scheduled next Monday--other films by or about gays screening this week include "Orpheus" (1949) and "Les Enfants Terribles" (1950). They will be shown in a double-feature today at 1 and 8 p.m. among the weekend offerings in the County Museum of Art's ongoing Jean Cocteau retrospective.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2008
Director AND producer Bart DeLorenzo has been busy in the Southland theater scene nonstop since he arrived from Massachusetts in the early '90s. He is the founding artistic director of the Evidence Room, where he helmed productions of "The Cherry Orchard," "Don Carlos," "Hard Times" and "Mayhem." He recently took on Joan Rivers in "A Work in Progress by a Life in Progress," and is currently directing "Shipwrecked!" at the Geffen.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2006 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
Indifferently received when it debuted in France, never before theatrically released in the United States, Jean-Pierre Melville's 1969 "Army of Shadows" stands revealed as a classic film that a trick of fate has made as relevant now as when it was made. French director Melville is best known for haunting, totally individual gangster melodramas such as "Bob Le Flambeur" and the dazzling "Le Samourai."
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