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Jean Porter

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NEWS
April 26, 1999 | RAY TESSLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This is a tale of the Orange County that once was a place where people came for space and freedom and discovered the world was rushing in right behind them. It is also about love, loss, and, above all, Jeanne Porter and her late husband, Sam. They, or rather Jeanne, represents the last of a kind: Possessor of one of the few privately owned ranches left in south Orange County. When they moved there 22 years ago, the Porters could see one light in the distance.
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NEWS
April 26, 1999 | RAY TESSLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This is a tale of the Orange County that once was a place where people came for space and freedom and discovered the world was rushing in right behind them. It is also about love, loss, and, above all, Jeanne Porter and her late husband, Sam. They, or rather Jeanne, represents the last of a kind: Possessor of one of the few privately owned ranches left in south Orange County. When they moved there 22 years ago, the Porters could see one light in the distance.
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TRAVEL
September 1, 2002
Returning from our first trip abroad after a 14-hour flight, we did not happily anticipate entering Customs in Los Angeles International Airport, but we were greeted with courtesy, patience and a huge effort to see that we understood their procedure with baggage. Customs and security people in the airport deserve a pat on the back for the way they deal with weary passengers. JEAN PORTER NIELSEN Palm Desert
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1985
Recently I moved into a house that was built in 1917 (just a few years before I was born). This house speaks to me because of its situation. The house is open on all four sides--none of this business about attached garages or gloomy condos--and the south and west windows of my room are shaded by a huge cup of gold vine. The house speaks of a time, within my memory, when the air in the Los Angeles area was clear and unpolluted. It speaks of the time when houses were, with space between houses, so that the clean, pure breezes could come through to freshen and cool the interior.
NEWS
July 3, 1999 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Edward Dmytryk, the once-influential director who made his mark in the 1940s with noirish thrillers such as "Murder My Sweet" but whose work was eclipsed by his decision to name names before the House Un-American Activities Committee, died Thursday night at his home in Encino. He was 90. Dmytryk, one of the last surviving members of the so-called Hollywood 10 (just Ring Lardner Jr.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 1996 | Glenn Lovell, Glenn Lovell, film critic for the San Jose Mercury News and Knight-Ridder Newspapers, is currently on a National Arts Journalism Fellowship at USC
Still plenty hard-nosed, like one of his hellbent heroes, Edward Dmytryk isn't ready to concede that he entered into the Hollywood version of a Faustian bargain to save his skin. "Oh, God, that's the way the left-wing journalists have always described it," moans the 87-year-old filmmaker between classes at USC, where he teaches directing and editing. "That's all bolshi talk."
MAGAZINE
July 30, 1995 | Richard C. Paddock, Richard C. Paddock covers Northern California for The Times
The boy who would grow up to direct "The Caine Mutiny" was a 13-year-old student at Lockwood Street School on the fringes of Hollywood when he was discovered by Lewis M. Terman, the inventor of the modern-day IQ test. It was 1922, and the Stanford University professor had dispersed a small flock of assistants to test children around the state.
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