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Jean Renoir

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2010
The next month will see a welcome explosion of the films of the great humanist director Jean Renoir at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, timed to coincide with a tribute to his painter father. This Saturday features the frolicsome "French Cancan" while March 19 has the unforgettable "La Bête Humaine," starring Jean Gabin and Simone Simon. March 20 brings "The Southerner," with a guest appearance by one of the film's actors, Norman Lloyd. This is one filmmaker for whom there really is no modern equivalent.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Even after nine decades as an actor, Norman Lloyd loves to perform - even if it's for an audience of one. During a recent interview, Lloyd was brandishing the cleaver used in "Man From the South," the landmark 1960 episode of "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" starring Steve McQueen and Peter Lorre that Lloyd directed. The ironically macabre tale revolves around a young gambler who makes a gruesome bet with an elderly man to win the man's convertible. If the gambler's lighter lights 10 times straight he will win the car, but if it doesn't the man will cut the gambler's pinkie finger off with a cleaver.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2010
For fans of older films on bigger screens, Saturday night presents a real dilemma. Should you go the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and catch the last two films of the Jean Renoir retrospective, which just happen to be two of the best: the classic "The Rules of the Game" and the charming not-on-DVD "A Day in the Country"? Or should you go to UCLA's Royce Auditorium for an organ tribute to the partnership between composer Bernard Herrmann and Alfred Hitchcock, including an improvised Herrmannesque organ score to Hitchcock's silent 1927 thriller, "The Lodger"?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Renoir" is a lush, involving film that deals not with one Renoir but two, as well as the strong-minded woman who was a key player in both their lives. The year is 1915, the setting the gorgeous landscape of the French Riviera, and Renoir the father, the recently widowed 74-year-old Impressionist painter Pierre-Auguste (the veteran Michel Bouquet), is hungry for inspiration. His son, future filmmaker Jean Renoir, is only 21, a wounded World War I veteran come home to the family compound at Cagnes-sur-Mer to convalesce.
NEWS
May 30, 1991
Eugene Lourie, a former painter and ballet set designer better known as the internationally heralded art director for film director Jean Renoir's "Grand Illusion" and "The Rules of the Game" has died. His daughter, Anita Bigelow, said Wednesday that her father--who directed a series of science fiction thrillers in the 1950s--was 88 when he died Sunday from complications of a stroke at the Motion Picture and Television Hospital in Woodland Hills.
BOOKS
September 11, 1994 | Kevin Thomas, Kevin Thomas is a Times film writer
With his profound insight into human nature and equal warmth and compassion, Jean Renoir could be as powerful a presence as his film masterpieces, "Grand Illusion" and "The Rules of the Game." For decades he and his Brazilian-born second wife, Dido, lived in a spacious, sun-filled house overlooking Beverly Hills, where they loved to entertain friends with good food and good conversation and sometimes screen one of Renoir's films after dinner.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
The world of cinema mourned when Jean Renoir died in Beverly Hills in 1979 at the age of 84. One of the most influential directors of the 20th century, noted for such masterpieces as 1937's "Grand Illusion," 1939's "Rules of the Game" and 1945's "The Southerner," the French filmmaker was widely embraced by the young Turks of France's New Wave, including Francois Truffaut and Jean-Luc Godard. But there was little notice seven months later when Renoir's first wife, Andree Heuschling, who acted in his silent films as Catherine Hessling, died in France at the age of 79. After their divorce in 1930, she soon retired from acting and drifted into obscurity.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1990 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
"The Huntsman," a youthful portrait of filmmaker Jean Renoir by his father, French Impressionist Pierre-Auguste Renoir, has been given to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Jean Renoir bequeathed the painting to the museum at his death in 1979, but it remained in the family estate until the death of his widow, Dido, earlier this year. The life-size portrayal of a 15-year-old boy in a lush green landscape will go on view today on the second floor of the Ahmanson Building.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1994 | LEO BRAUDY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Long before any director with the right agent could get his name in a special box on the billboard, Jean Renoir was considered to be one of a handful of filmmakers whose artistic stamp could be found everywhere in their work. Renoir himself called such directors auteurs , directors who wrote their own scripts. But the term was later expanded to identify those directors whose personal vision could overcome the fragmentations of a collaborative art.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2004
Stage and Spectacle: Three Films by Jean Renoir Criterion Collection, $80 The curtain rises: After spending a disappointing exile in Hollywood during World War II, the great French director Jean Renoir of "Grand Illusion" and "The Rules of the Game" fame returned home.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
The world of cinema mourned when Jean Renoir died in Beverly Hills in 1979 at the age of 84. One of the most influential directors of the 20th century, noted for such masterpieces as 1937's "Grand Illusion," 1939's "Rules of the Game" and 1945's "The Southerner," the French filmmaker was widely embraced by the young Turks of France's New Wave, including Francois Truffaut and Jean-Luc Godard. But there was little notice seven months later when Renoir's first wife, Andree Heuschling, who acted in his silent films as Catherine Hessling, died in France at the age of 79. After their divorce in 1930, she soon retired from acting and drifted into obscurity.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2012 | By Stephen Farber, Special to the Los Angeles Times
World War II has inspired far more movies than any other war, which is understandable, given the sharp demarcation between good and evil that characterized the battle against Hitler and his allies. By contrast, World War I is rarely depicted on the screen. It doesn't offer the same moral clarity as the fight against fascist tyranny. In one of the best World War I movies, Peter Weir's "Gallipoli," a hermit living in the Australian outback asks the young hero how the war started. "I don't know exactly," the eager recruit replies, "but it was the Germans' fault.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2011
"Grand Illusion" Jean Renoir's 1937 antiwar film set in a World War I POW camp was the first foreign production to earn a best film Oscar nomination. "Il Generale della Rovere" Roberto Rossellini directed this award-winning 1959 World War II drama starring famed Italian director Vittorio De Sica as a con man arrested by the Gestapo. "War and Peace" Sergei Bondarchuk's epic adaptation of Leo Tolstoy's novel won the 1968 best foreign film Oscar.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2011 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Writer-director Kevin Smith describes Michael Parks as "porn for actors. If you like actors and you discover Michael Parks in a scene and you have never seen him before, your brain explodes. He will take a page of dialogue and deliver it in a different way than anybody else. " Parks, 71, is starring in Smith's latest film, "Red State," available on video-on-demand, as Abin Cooper, a Fred Phelps-like preacher. In this thriller, Cooper and his cult have been kidnapping and killing teenage boys they believe to be gay. What makes Parks' performance terrifying is how he deftly blends a soft-spoken demeanor with a charismatic intensity and venom.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2011 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Veteran French filmmaker Bertrand Tavernier ("A Sunday in the Country," "Life and Nothing But," "'Round Midnight") has a simple philosophy when it comes to making period pieces — just because the film is set in the past, that doesn't mean the characters should be living in the past. But Tavernier admits achieving his philosophy was something of a balancing act in the case of his latest movie, the swashbuckling romantic drama "The Princess of Montpensier," which opened Friday. Set in 1562 during the Catholic-Protestant wars in France, "Princess" revolves around the teenage aristocrat Marie (Melanie Thierry)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2010 | By Susan King
When the City of Lights, City of Angels French film festival began 13 years ago, about 2,000 Francophiles flocked to see the latest in Gallic cinema. The festival has grown since then -- last year saw 15,000 attendees -- and this year, its 14th, the programming promises to be among the most eclectic it has ever seen. "You have art-house style films but also very popular, very entertaining films.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2010
For fans of older films on bigger screens, Saturday night presents a real dilemma. Should you go the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and catch the last two films of the Jean Renoir retrospective, which just happen to be two of the best: the classic "The Rules of the Game" and the charming not-on-DVD "A Day in the Country"? Or should you go to UCLA's Royce Auditorium for an organ tribute to the partnership between composer Bernard Herrmann and Alfred Hitchcock, including an improvised Herrmannesque organ score to Hitchcock's silent 1927 thriller, "The Lodger"?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2010
The next month will see a welcome explosion of the films of the great humanist director Jean Renoir at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, timed to coincide with a tribute to his painter father. This Saturday features the frolicsome "French Cancan" while March 19 has the unforgettable "La Bête Humaine," starring Jean Gabin and Simone Simon. March 20 brings "The Southerner," with a guest appearance by one of the film's actors, Norman Lloyd. This is one filmmaker for whom there really is no modern equivalent.
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