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Jean Seberg

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1997
I am glad to see that someone remembered Jean Seberg, as Neal Gabler has in his article ("A Reminder of the Old FBI," Opinion, June 8) about Geronimo Pratt and the FBI's [counterintelligence division] COINTELPRO operations against Martin Luther King and the Black Panthers. Some commentators have suggested that COINTELPRO amounted to only a few "poison pen" letters. Gabler's account makes the human tragedy inherent in COINTELPRO all too real. The COINTELPRO operations do not mitigate the Panthers' culpability.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
All you need to make a movie, Jean-Luc Godard famously proposed, is a girl and a gun, and he proved that formula the first time out of the box with his 1960 "Breathless," the fatalistic romance that started a revolution. Beginning a 50th-anniversary run with a new 35-mm print, "Breathless" is that rare revival that, against noticeable odds, retains the elements that made it celebrated half a century ago. Starring Jean-Paul Belmondo as a brash French hooligan and Jean Seberg as the American in Paris he loves against his better judgment, "Breathless" caused a sensation when it took its place as one of the first examples of what came to be known as la Nouvelle Vague, a.k.a.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1996 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mark Rappaport's venturesome "From the Journals of Jean Seberg" imagines that the ill-fated actress, an apparent suicide in 1979 at age 40, has risen from the grave to tell us the story of her roller coaster life. Mary Beth Hurt plays Seberg, who narrates her experiences within the interlocking contexts of feminism, politics and cinema as we watch a variety of clips from her films and from those of others.
NEWS
May 24, 2010
Capsule reviews are by Kenneth Turan (K.Tu.), Betsy Sharkey (B.S.) and other reviewers. Compiled by Anthony Miller. Openings THURSDAY Sex and the City 2 Carrie, Samantha, Charlotte and Miranda take on a slightly more domesticated New York City. With Sarah Jessica Parker, Kim Cattrall, Kristin Davis, Cynthia Nixon, Chris Noth, David Eigenberg, Evan Handler, Jason Lewis, Mario Cantone and Willie Garson. Written and directed by Michael Patrick King.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1989 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
There are plenty of cautionary tales in the Hollywood chronicles: careers that rose and fell like rockets, careers that never quite got going, careers cut short by mischance. Few stories have seemed to me more bitterly sad than Jean Seberg's. The robust and beautiful young woman from Marshalltown, Iowa, had won an audition to be Otto Preminger's Joan of Arc in "Saint Joan," and you would have said, as the press releases did, that it was an updated Cinderella story.
NEWS
May 24, 2010
Capsule reviews are by Kenneth Turan (K.Tu.), Betsy Sharkey (B.S.) and other reviewers. Compiled by Anthony Miller. Openings THURSDAY Sex and the City 2 Carrie, Samantha, Charlotte and Miranda take on a slightly more domesticated New York City. With Sarah Jessica Parker, Kim Cattrall, Kristin Davis, Cynthia Nixon, Chris Noth, David Eigenberg, Evan Handler, Jason Lewis, Mario Cantone and Willie Garson. Written and directed by Michael Patrick King.
NEWS
February 10, 1994 | MARK CHALON SMITH, Mark Chalon Smith is a free-lancer who regularly writes about film for the Times Orange County Edition
The camera in "Breathless" jumps all over the place, as if director Jean-Luc Godard's cinematographer was hyperventilating, maybe breathless himself. It was just one of the unconventional stylizations that freaked critics of the day. Many hated the 1960 movie, some calling it a lurid mess of technical ineptitude. Newsweek's headline over a meager review just said: "What Is It?" Ah, the shortsighted views of the film establishment.
NEWS
February 2, 2006 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
THE tragic Jean Seberg brings considerable style to a pair of 1960s dramas being shown as part of UCLA's "Columbia Restorations" series. In the first, the Iowa-born beauty, who died at age 40 of a drug overdose, stars opposite Warren Beatty as the schizophrenic title character in 1964's "Lilith," directed by Robert Rossen. Beatty plays Vincent, a war veteran who comes to work as an occupational therapist at the private mental health facility where the disturbed young woman lives.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
All you need to make a movie, Jean-Luc Godard famously proposed, is a girl and a gun, and he proved that formula the first time out of the box with his 1960 "Breathless," the fatalistic romance that started a revolution. Beginning a 50th-anniversary run with a new 35-mm print, "Breathless" is that rare revival that, against noticeable odds, retains the elements that made it celebrated half a century ago. Starring Jean-Paul Belmondo as a brash French hooligan and Jean Seberg as the American in Paris he loves against his better judgment, "Breathless" caused a sensation when it took its place as one of the first examples of what came to be known as la Nouvelle Vague, a.k.a.
NEWS
February 2, 2006 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
THE tragic Jean Seberg brings considerable style to a pair of 1960s dramas being shown as part of UCLA's "Columbia Restorations" series. In the first, the Iowa-born beauty, who died at age 40 of a drug overdose, stars opposite Warren Beatty as the schizophrenic title character in 1964's "Lilith," directed by Robert Rossen. Beatty plays Vincent, a war veteran who comes to work as an occupational therapist at the private mental health facility where the disturbed young woman lives.
NEWS
April 14, 2002 | ALLAN M. JALON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A new book and documentary about maverick editor Jim Bellows show how he featured celebrity gossip at newspapers he's run since the 1960s and later on TV. Neither, however, looks at what he calls "a big mistake" of his career, an episode in which derogatory information about a famous actress was publicized by the FBI, using a gossip column in the Los Angeles Times. But in recent interviews, Bellows for the first time detailed how the episode unfolded.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1997
I am glad to see that someone remembered Jean Seberg, as Neal Gabler has in his article ("A Reminder of the Old FBI," Opinion, June 8) about Geronimo Pratt and the FBI's [counterintelligence division] COINTELPRO operations against Martin Luther King and the Black Panthers. Some commentators have suggested that COINTELPRO amounted to only a few "poison pen" letters. Gabler's account makes the human tragedy inherent in COINTELPRO all too real. The COINTELPRO operations do not mitigate the Panthers' culpability.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1996 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mark Rappaport's venturesome "From the Journals of Jean Seberg" imagines that the ill-fated actress, an apparent suicide in 1979 at age 40, has risen from the grave to tell us the story of her roller coaster life. Mary Beth Hurt plays Seberg, who narrates her experiences within the interlocking contexts of feminism, politics and cinema as we watch a variety of clips from her films and from those of others.
NEWS
February 10, 1994 | MARK CHALON SMITH, Mark Chalon Smith is a free-lancer who regularly writes about film for the Times Orange County Edition
The camera in "Breathless" jumps all over the place, as if director Jean-Luc Godard's cinematographer was hyperventilating, maybe breathless himself. It was just one of the unconventional stylizations that freaked critics of the day. Many hated the 1960 movie, some calling it a lurid mess of technical ineptitude. Newsweek's headline over a meager review just said: "What Is It?" Ah, the shortsighted views of the film establishment.
NEWS
April 14, 2002 | ALLAN M. JALON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A new book and documentary about maverick editor Jim Bellows show how he featured celebrity gossip at newspapers he's run since the 1960s and later on TV. Neither, however, looks at what he calls "a big mistake" of his career, an episode in which derogatory information about a famous actress was publicized by the FBI, using a gossip column in the Los Angeles Times. But in recent interviews, Bellows for the first time detailed how the episode unfolded.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1986
How often does this disinformation practice take place, and is the practice limited to known scoundrels like Kadafi? Further, is this practice used against American citizens still, as it was used against actress Jean Seberg a decade or so ago? The constitutionality of such a practice is questionable, but what is really bothersome is the fact that there is no system of checks and balances to keep this practice from being abused to the point that our American free press becomes hostage to the whims of the Reagan Administration.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1989 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
There are plenty of cautionary tales in the Hollywood chronicles: careers that rose and fell like rockets, careers that never quite got going, careers cut short by mischance. Few stories have seemed to me more bitterly sad than Jean Seberg's. The robust and beautiful young woman from Marshalltown, Iowa, had won an audition to be Otto Preminger's Joan of Arc in "Saint Joan," and you would have said, as the press releases did, that it was an updated Cinderella story.
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