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Jean Shepherd

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1999 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jean Shepherd, the prolific radio raconteur whose easy storytelling style earned comparisons to Mark Twain, died Saturday. He was 78. Shepherd died in a hospital near his home on Sanibel Island, Fla., said his longtime friend and business advisor, Irwin Zwilling. In his 21 years on 50,000-watt WOR-AM in New York City, Shepherd attracted a large and loyal following along the Eastern Seaboard.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2013 | By Ed Stockly
Customized TV Listings are available here: www.latimes.com/tvtimes Click here to download TV listings for the week of Dec. 22 - 28, 2013 in PDF format This week's TV Movies     SPECIALS 54th Annual L.A. County Holiday Celebration More than 20 local choirs, musical ensembles and dance companies take part in this free, three-hour live event at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in downtown L.A. 3 p.m. KCET...
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1988 | JAY SHARBUTT, Times Staff Writer
The Narrator once spoke of "the great inverted bowl of darkness . . . the Midwest." There he "learned to dream the American dream--of the beautiful future, the glorious past and the crummy now." The Narrator was, and still is, Jean Shepherd. He spoke those words in the mid-1970s, in PBS' acclaimed "The Phantom of the Open Hearth," a sardonic slice of Americana. It concerned life, being a teen-ager and worse. He now continues in that vein with "Ollie Hopnoodle's Haven of Bliss."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd
24 hours of "A Christmas Story" (TBS, Tuesday and Wednesday). Jean Shepherd's hardy holiday classic turns 30 this year. (I will pause for those who need to sit for a second in order to take that number in.) Adding tradition to tradition, TBS will again air the film for 24 hours straight, 12 times in a row, beginning at 8 p.m. Christmas Eve; some brave souls may take this as a challenge -- a triple-dog-dare challenge. (Anyone up wrapping presents at 4 a.m. should at least appreciate the company.)
TRAVEL
December 26, 2010
Leon Logothetis' article ["Revelation Road," Dec. 19] on the joys of travel was great. I have been a world traveler since arriving in England in 1974, knowing no one, and hitchhiking all around Europe. I am still an adventurer and traveler and am so grateful for it. I encourage others to get out of this country and see what the rest of the world is about. It is such a great thing. Michael Kimmel, San Diego I greatly enjoyed reading about the "Christmas Story" house ["Hide in the Cupboard," by Jay Jones, Dec. 19]
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2000 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Writer, actor, philosopher and radio host Harry Shearer of KCRW-FM (89.9) met the late radio legend Jean Shepherd just once. It was during the watershed summer of 1963, when Martin Luther King Jr. led 250,000 in the March on Washington for civil rights. Shearer was the editor of UCLA's humor magazine, Satyr, and he spent several hours one night interviewing Shepherd.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1989 | IRV LETOFSKY
You can tell by a cute title like "Ollie Hopnoodle's Haven of Bliss" that you're going to get a lot of cute. And "Ollie etc." delivers 90 minutes of cute tonight on PBS' "American Playhouse" (9 p.m. on Channels 28 and 15). It's from the pen of humorist Jean Shepherd, whose "A Christmas Story" feature film is something of a cult favorite. As a chronicler of Americana, Shepherd, who also plays a couple of characters in this adventure, must be drawing on his old family vacations from back home in Indiana.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2009
SUNDAY Every season, it seems there's at least one contestant who generates as much admiration as aggravation; this time around, it's the burly, bearded Russell, above, who is still very much in contention to win it all on the season finale of "Survivor: Samoa." (8 and 10 p.m. CBS) MONDAY He's the scion of folk music royalty, he's channeled Judy Garland and covered Leonard Cohen, and now the new documentary "Rufus Wainwright: Prima Donna" spotlights this eclectic and eccentric singer-songwriter as he prepares to mount his very first opera.
NEWS
May 28, 1989 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
The Thin Blue Line (Channel 28 Sunday at 1 p.m.), Errol Morris' 1988 true-life film investigation of a Byzantine Dallas murder case, is a gutsy, clear-eyed work; it exposed the case's amazingly sloppy and prejudiced conduct and aided in the reversal of Randall Adams' conviction. But the film failed on appeal with the Motion Picture Academy's documentary committee; they refused to nominate it for an Oscar, though the nation's movie critics overwhelmingly disagreed with them. So do I. The movie--which uses film noir -ish re-creations of the crime, a hypnotic Phillip Glass score and mesmerizing interviews with the principals--is something new in American Gothic: horror with a tabloid cutting edge.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd
24 hours of "A Christmas Story" (TBS, Tuesday and Wednesday). Jean Shepherd's hardy holiday classic turns 30 this year. (I will pause for those who need to sit for a second in order to take that number in.) Adding tradition to tradition, TBS will again air the film for 24 hours straight, 12 times in a row, beginning at 8 p.m. Christmas Eve; some brave souls may take this as a challenge -- a triple-dog-dare challenge. (Anyone up wrapping presents at 4 a.m. should at least appreciate the company.)
TRAVEL
December 26, 2010
Leon Logothetis' article ["Revelation Road," Dec. 19] on the joys of travel was great. I have been a world traveler since arriving in England in 1974, knowing no one, and hitchhiking all around Europe. I am still an adventurer and traveler and am so grateful for it. I encourage others to get out of this country and see what the rest of the world is about. It is such a great thing. Michael Kimmel, San Diego I greatly enjoyed reading about the "Christmas Story" house ["Hide in the Cupboard," by Jay Jones, Dec. 19]
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2009
SUNDAY Every season, it seems there's at least one contestant who generates as much admiration as aggravation; this time around, it's the burly, bearded Russell, above, who is still very much in contention to win it all on the season finale of "Survivor: Samoa." (8 and 10 p.m. CBS) MONDAY He's the scion of folk music royalty, he's channeled Judy Garland and covered Leonard Cohen, and now the new documentary "Rufus Wainwright: Prima Donna" spotlights this eclectic and eccentric singer-songwriter as he prepares to mount his very first opera.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2000 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Writer, actor, philosopher and radio host Harry Shearer of KCRW-FM (89.9) met the late radio legend Jean Shepherd just once. It was during the watershed summer of 1963, when Martin Luther King Jr. led 250,000 in the March on Washington for civil rights. Shearer was the editor of UCLA's humor magazine, Satyr, and he spent several hours one night interviewing Shepherd.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1999 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jean Shepherd, the prolific radio raconteur whose easy storytelling style earned comparisons to Mark Twain, died Saturday. He was 78. Shepherd died in a hospital near his home on Sanibel Island, Fla., said his longtime friend and business advisor, Irwin Zwilling. In his 21 years on 50,000-watt WOR-AM in New York City, Shepherd attracted a large and loyal following along the Eastern Seaboard.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1989 | IRV LETOFSKY
You can tell by a cute title like "Ollie Hopnoodle's Haven of Bliss" that you're going to get a lot of cute. And "Ollie etc." delivers 90 minutes of cute tonight on PBS' "American Playhouse" (9 p.m. on Channels 28 and 15). It's from the pen of humorist Jean Shepherd, whose "A Christmas Story" feature film is something of a cult favorite. As a chronicler of Americana, Shepherd, who also plays a couple of characters in this adventure, must be drawing on his old family vacations from back home in Indiana.
NEWS
May 28, 1989 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
The Thin Blue Line (Channel 28 Sunday at 1 p.m.), Errol Morris' 1988 true-life film investigation of a Byzantine Dallas murder case, is a gutsy, clear-eyed work; it exposed the case's amazingly sloppy and prejudiced conduct and aided in the reversal of Randall Adams' conviction. But the film failed on appeal with the Motion Picture Academy's documentary committee; they refused to nominate it for an Oscar, though the nation's movie critics overwhelmingly disagreed with them. So do I. The movie--which uses film noir -ish re-creations of the crime, a hypnotic Phillip Glass score and mesmerizing interviews with the principals--is something new in American Gothic: horror with a tabloid cutting edge.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2013 | By Ed Stockly
Customized TV Listings are available here: www.latimes.com/tvtimes Click here to download TV listings for the week of Dec. 22 - 28, 2013 in PDF format This week's TV Movies     SPECIALS 54th Annual L.A. County Holiday Celebration More than 20 local choirs, musical ensembles and dance companies take part in this free, three-hour live event at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in downtown L.A. 3 p.m. KCET...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2012 | By Susan King
A gripping western, a beloved holiday film, a 115-year-old movie capturing a famous boxing match, a memoir of a Holocaust survivor and a visionary science-fiction thriller in which Keanu Reeves utters the word “whoa” are among the 25 films selected for inclusion in the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress. Congress established the National Film Registry in 1989 to highlight the need to preserve U.S. film heritage. Under the conditions of the National Film Preservation Act, the librarian of Congress names 25 films yearly that are “culturally, historically or aesthetically significant.” The films must be at least 10 years old. For the record: An article about the National Film Registry described “A League of Their Own” as being about the All American-Girls Professional Softball League.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1988 | JAY SHARBUTT, Times Staff Writer
The Narrator once spoke of "the great inverted bowl of darkness . . . the Midwest." There he "learned to dream the American dream--of the beautiful future, the glorious past and the crummy now." The Narrator was, and still is, Jean Shepherd. He spoke those words in the mid-1970s, in PBS' acclaimed "The Phantom of the Open Hearth," a sardonic slice of Americana. It concerned life, being a teen-ager and worse. He now continues in that vein with "Ollie Hopnoodle's Haven of Bliss."
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