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Jean Sibelius

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1991 | HERBERT GLASS
Jean Sibelius' most important contributions to musical thinking may have been the notion, expressed in his last four symphonies, that great symphonic structures could be achieved without dogged adherence to sonata form or the usual division into distinct movements, and that great climactic strength could be achieved without piling on sonority with the sweaty insistence of a Bruckner.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2007 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles Philharmonic's "Sibelius Unbound" series began late last month with marvelously silly swans flapping through the finale of the triumphant Fifth Symphony. Seven symphonies, a string quartet and handful of symphonic poems later -- along with modern Finnish music and a Steven Stucky world premiere -- "Sibelius Unbound" ended again with the Fifth on Friday night. Sans swans. But not sans marvels or triumphs. The Fifth has a heroic ending.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1986 | ALBERT GOLDBERG
One-composer programs can be a problem, particularly when the composer is as insistently somber and relentlessly personal as Jean Sibelius.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2007 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to The Times
It's a bit startling to realize that Jean Sibelius has been dead for only 50 years, for he is a figure who seems like part of a deeper past. To put it in stark perspective, he was born in the year (1865) the Civil War ended and "Tristan and Isolde" was first heard, and he survived well into the second year (1957) of Elvis Presley's heyday and just two weeks short of the launch of Sputnik.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1996 | TIMOTHY MANGAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Once heard, Sibelius' "Kullervo" Symphony is hard to forget. Heard many times, the same composer's "Tapiola" remains an enigma. Your heart beats strong during the one; your mind puzzles over the other. In a program that could have been titled "The Beginning and the End of Jean Sibelius," Esa-Pekka Salonen and the Los Angeles Philharmonic performed these two works, and these only, at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion Thursday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2007 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to The Times
It's a bit startling to realize that Jean Sibelius has been dead for only 50 years, for he is a figure who seems like part of a deeper past. To put it in stark perspective, he was born in the year (1865) the Civil War ended and "Tristan and Isolde" was first heard, and he survived well into the second year (1957) of Elvis Presley's heyday and just two weeks short of the launch of Sputnik.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1996 | Herbert Glass, Herbert Glass is a regular contributor to Calendar
After decades of neglect, the music of Jean Sibelius is again in favor in this country and Western Europe, thanks in no small part to its championing by such leading conductors of the younger generation as Simon Rattle and Esa-Pekka Salonen. And while the composer may never have been out of style in his native Finland, there has been a shift in the center of Sibelian gravity there, away from Helsinki, which has always had the putative major orchestras.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1986 | HERBERT GLASS
Few composers have suffered a more complete decline in popularity than Jean Sibelius did after his death in 1954. At that time, in fact, many listeners did not know that his life hadn't ended in 1927, when he wrote his last works. During the early decades of this century, Sibelius was commonly ranked with Brahms as a symphonist.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2007 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles Philharmonic's "Sibelius Unbound" series began late last month with marvelously silly swans flapping through the finale of the triumphant Fifth Symphony. Seven symphonies, a string quartet and handful of symphonic poems later -- along with modern Finnish music and a Steven Stucky world premiere -- "Sibelius Unbound" ended again with the Fifth on Friday night. Sans swans. But not sans marvels or triumphs. The Fifth has a heroic ending.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1996
I have to correct certain statements by Mr. Christer Dahlsten (Letters, Oct. 27). He states, incorrectly, that the Swedish-speaking minority of Finland consists of 7% of the population. The correct number is 5.9%. He adds that this minority stands for 70% of the GNP of the country. This is also untrue. The correct number is the above-mentioned 5.9%. He speaks about "the Swedes of Finland." No such entity exists or has ever existed. You can only talk about a Swedish-speaking minority.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1996 | TIMOTHY MANGAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Once heard, Sibelius' "Kullervo" Symphony is hard to forget. Heard many times, the same composer's "Tapiola" remains an enigma. Your heart beats strong during the one; your mind puzzles over the other. In a program that could have been titled "The Beginning and the End of Jean Sibelius," Esa-Pekka Salonen and the Los Angeles Philharmonic performed these two works, and these only, at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion Thursday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1996 | Herbert Glass, Herbert Glass is a regular contributor to Calendar
After decades of neglect, the music of Jean Sibelius is again in favor in this country and Western Europe, thanks in no small part to its championing by such leading conductors of the younger generation as Simon Rattle and Esa-Pekka Salonen. And while the composer may never have been out of style in his native Finland, there has been a shift in the center of Sibelian gravity there, away from Helsinki, which has always had the putative major orchestras.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1991 | HERBERT GLASS
Jean Sibelius' most important contributions to musical thinking may have been the notion, expressed in his last four symphonies, that great symphonic structures could be achieved without dogged adherence to sonata form or the usual division into distinct movements, and that great climactic strength could be achieved without piling on sonority with the sweaty insistence of a Bruckner.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1986 | HERBERT GLASS
Few composers have suffered a more complete decline in popularity than Jean Sibelius did after his death in 1954. At that time, in fact, many listeners did not know that his life hadn't ended in 1927, when he wrote his last works. During the early decades of this century, Sibelius was commonly ranked with Brahms as a symphonist.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1986 | ALBERT GOLDBERG
One-composer programs can be a problem, particularly when the composer is as insistently somber and relentlessly personal as Jean Sibelius.
NEWS
October 27, 1989 | From Reuters
Raisa Gorbachev has delighted crowds in Finland with an elegance that has made her a controversial figure at home. Accompanying her husband, Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, on a three-day state visit to Finland, the Soviet first lady drew admiration on every stop of her own special schedule--a museum, a huge abstract sculpture, a school and a cheese factory. "The Soviet Union's secret weapon has conquered Helsinki . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1990 | TIMOTHY MANGAN
A concert by the Los Angeles Doctors Symphony Orchestra may not be the cultural event of the season, but for at least one listener Tuesday night's performance at Stephen S. Wise Temple proved memorable. The group has no pretensions to greatness. Established in 1953, the orchestra roster includes physicians, dentists, nurses and other medical personnel. Concerts are free, charity activities a major function.
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