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NEWS
November 18, 1990 | IRENE LACHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If MCA maven Jules Stein had had his druthers--and he generally saw to it that he did--his elder daughter Jean would have become a Hollywood agent. Not just a Hollywood agent. A wonderful Hollywood agent. "She had that gift for putting people together, for making things happen, for creating an environment or a climate in which people helped each other," says Joan Didion, a longtime friend and occasional confidante of the Steins.
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NEWS
November 18, 1990 | IRENE LACHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If MCA maven Jules Stein had had his druthers--and he generally saw to it that he did--his elder daughter Jean would have become a Hollywood agent. Not just a Hollywood agent. A wonderful Hollywood agent. "She had that gift for putting people together, for making things happen, for creating an environment or a climate in which people helped each other," says Joan Didion, a longtime friend and occasional confidante of the Steins.
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NEWS
February 17, 1991
The Peter Jennings special for children (ABC, Jan. 26) with questions about the war was outstanding. His conversations with the children were intelligent and reassuring. Jean Stein, Idyllwild
NEWS
August 18, 1985 | JODY JACOBS
It was a strident 1981 newspaper headline, "Plastics Heir Kills Mom," with its chilling reportage on matricide and incest that set Natalie Robins on a different path. A published poet, she was at the stage in her career in which she had decided to "move into prose." As she sipped her tea in one of the private rooms at the Regency Club recently, she explained, "I wanted to write a novel a poet wouldn't write. With lots of action. And when I saw that article I knew it was a book."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 1986 | From Associated Press
Eight people, including three Pulitzer Prize winners, won $5,000 awards for "works of distinction" from the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters. David Mamet, a 1984 Pulitzer winner for the play "Glengarry Glen Ross," Marsha Norman, who won in 1983 for her play " 'night Mother" (now playing at the Mark Taper Forum in Los Angeles) and Robert A. Caro, a 1975 winner for his biography of Robert Moses, received awards.
NEWS
July 15, 1986 | MARYLOUISE OATES, Times Staff Writer
Lew and Edie Wasserman celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary Saturday night--and had 700 of their closest friends over to a dazzler of a Hollywood event. "The next time, they can't just take over the studio. They'll have to take over a country," quipped their longtime buddy, Mickey Ziffren, to her husband, Paul. The guest list was astronomical--as in stars.
NEWS
February 15, 1989 | DAVID REMNICK, The Washington Post
After 34 years of censorship, "Lolita," Vladimir Nabokov's greatest creation and Russian emigre literature's most notorious scandal, will be published this spring in a special edition printed by the Soviet journal Foreign Literature. The world has grown accustomed to the liberalization of culture in the Soviet Union. But the case of "Lolita" is a landmark--not only of literature but also of morality.
BOOKS
February 2, 1997
Editor's Note: In 1953, Christopher Isherwood met Don Bachardy, an 18-year-old college student who would become a highly regarded artist as well as Isherwood's lifelong lover and companion. On Valentine's Day 1960, seven years after meeting Bachardy, Isherwood wrote in his diary: "What shall I write about Don, after seven years? Only this--and I've written it often before--he has mattered and does matter more than any of the others.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 2000 | KENNETH REICH
After last week's column, recounting a Granada Hills teenager's two-month struggle to retrieve baggage lost on a Greyhound bus, I heard from a woman whose misplaced purse set in motion a much different series of events. It took The Times' inquiry to get Greyhound to return Erin McDuff's baggage 68 days after it was lost. Even then, it arrived at Erin's home without the more than $80 she had left in the bag.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1992 | ROBERT EPSTEIN
T he things they do. A study in two parts: Exhibit A: If you're a Hollywood producer with a big, expensive movie like Penny Marshall's "A League of Their Own," you do all of the usual things to attract audiences, like hit the TV talk shows and grant magazine interviews.
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