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Jean Terrell

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March 11, 1991 | From United Press International
Motown Sued Over Royalties: Singers Jean Terrell, who replaced Diana Ross in the Supremes, and Mary Wells sued Motown Record Corp. and its general partners, Motown Management Corp. and MCA Record Ventures Inc., for more than $1 million in disputed royalties. The singers contend that Motown breached their contracts and engaged in unfair business practices by failing to pay royalties for their recordings and use of their names and for failing to disclose how royalty payments are calculated.
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BUSINESS
March 11, 1991 | From United Press International
Motown Sued Over Royalties: Singers Jean Terrell, who replaced Diana Ross in the Supremes, and Mary Wells sued Motown Record Corp. and its general partners, Motown Management Corp. and MCA Record Ventures Inc., for more than $1 million in disputed royalties. The singers contend that Motown breached their contracts and engaged in unfair business practices by failing to pay royalties for their recordings and use of their names and for failing to disclose how royalty payments are calculated.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1992 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Want a recipe for an outstanding benefit concert? Blend a roomful of good singers with a healthy serving of classic songs and sit back and enjoy. That's what the "Singers' Salute to the Songwriter" programs have been doing for years, and the seventh annual installment at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion on Tuesday--which honored Johnny Mercer, Lamont Dozier, Jay Livingston & Ray Evans, Billy Byers and Bob and Dolores Hope--was a perfect illustration of how well the formula works.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2008 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
Levi Stubbs, the lead singer of the legendary Motown group the Four Tops whose tough yet soulful voice was showcased on dozens of singles, including "Baby I Need Your Loving" and "I Can't Help Myself (Sugar Pie, Honey Bunch)," has died. He was 72. Stubbs died Friday at his home in Detroit, the Wayne County Medical Examiner's office confirmed. A series of illnesses that included a stroke and cancer had caused him to stop performing in 2000.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2006 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
Choreographing the film version of "Dreamgirls" looked like a dream assignment and, to make it come true, Fatima Robinson spent a week staging the number "Steppin' to the Bad Side" for director Bill Condon's approval. She got the job, but it's impossible to see why in the finished film: Condon has chopped the choreography to the briefest glimpses of a male corps gyrating on moving platforms intercut with an array of narrative actions -- unreadable on the screen as dancing.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2000 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The release this week of "The Supremes," a four-CD retrospective of the biggest-selling female vocal group of the 1960s, should have been a textbook case of marketing synergy, hitting as it originally would have amid a Supremes reunion tour.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1995 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You remember Mary Wilson. She was the one in back. While the Supremes filled the 1960s with a medley of hit songs, she peered over Diana Ross' shoulder, cooing "oohs" and "baby baby." All of which paved the way for steady if less-celebrated work once the group disbanded. For the past two decades, this lesser Supreme has played clubs, corporate functions and state fairs.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1986 | ROBERT HILBURN
The note on the door of Frankie Jean Terrell's house on Louisiana Avenue read, "Gone to Alexandria for the day . . . Frankie Jean." The house is just a block from the old Assembly of God Church on Texas Avenue, where Terrell sang as a child with her older brother Jerry Lee Lewis and their cousin Jimmy Lee Swaggart. Her note was intended to ward off fans who come from as far as Australia--often on a side trip from Elvis' Graceland in Memphis--to see the old home of Lewis, the Wildman of Rock.
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