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Jean Yves Thibaudet

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NEWS
November 29, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Here's an interesting question: Let's suppose that there were actual recordings of Chopin performing his Etudes. Would you prefer to hear one, or hear a live performance by a contemporary pianist? That, in a sense, was one of several questions underlying the appearance by pianist Jean-Yves Thibaudet on Tuesday night at the Knitting Factory--an unusual element in his residency with the L.A.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2012 | James C. Taylor
Extremely soft and incredibly far away. This was the scene as film composer Alexandre Desplat presided over one of the scoring sessions for the film "Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close. " The film's premiere was just a month away and Desplat was trying to get the sound of the piano to be even lighter than pianissimo. Cut to: pianist Jean-Yves Thibaudet, watching and listening to Desplat's direction via a video screen. The French virtuoso had been in Vienna two days before, now he was isolated in a Manhattan recording studio two floors below Desplat and the full orchestra.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1994 | MARK SWED, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Jean-Yves Thibaudet welcomes a visitor to his Upper West Side penthouse, on one of the first warm days after the winter that no one stops complaining about, he is wearing faded jeans, loafers without socks, a black T-shirt with the sleeves rolled up, an expensive illuminated designer vest and a large stylish metallic crucifix. He is young, fit and looks like a million dollars. He could be a television or movie star.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2008 | Josef Woodard, Special to The Times
Although Thursday night's Hollywood Bowl performance by the Los Angeles Philharmonic had a mostly Russian feeling, its program was more complicated than that. Sure, the pioneering Glinka and the reliable crowd-pleaser Tchaikovsky run down the middle of Russian musical culture, and the Hungarian Zoltan Kodaly qualifies as compatible kin from the former Eastern Bloc. But Aram Khachaturian, whose Piano Concerto was the concert's centerpiece, was both Moscow-trained and proudly from and of Armenia.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2001 | DONNA PERLMUTTER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Outside sits his metallic aubergine Porsche bearing the license plate JYPIANO. Inside, Jean-Yves Thibaudet goes gamely through various poses for a photographer while showing off his newly renovated kitchen, done in faithfully replicated 1940s Spanish tile and outfitted with such luxe items as a temperature-controlled wine storage cabinet. It's the only habitable room of his Griffith Park house, now under serious reconstruction.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1990 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In March, the phone rang in pianist Helene Wickett's Northern California home. The management of the Minnesota Symphony wanted to know whether she could play Mozart's Concerto No. 27 with the orchestra and conductor Edo de Waart--on 24 hours' notice. Wickett said yes. Such is the life of a professional trying to make a career from the West Coast. "It was lots of fun," she said in a recent phone interview from her home in Redwood City, San Mateo County.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2003 | Daniel Cariaga, Times Staff Writer
At 41, Jean-Yves Thibaudet may be the finest exponent of French pianism since the heydays of Aldo Ciccolini and Jean-Marie Darre. He demonstrated why at his revelatory recital for the Philharmonic Society of Orange County Wednesday night in Segerstrom Hall in Costa Mesa. The Lyon-born pianist's many-faceted and ear-opening second half offered unhackneyed works by Debussy, Satie and Messiaen, played with a breathtaking mastery and unerring accuracy.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2008 | Josef Woodard, Special to The Times
Although Thursday night's Hollywood Bowl performance by the Los Angeles Philharmonic had a mostly Russian feeling, its program was more complicated than that. Sure, the pioneering Glinka and the reliable crowd-pleaser Tchaikovsky run down the middle of Russian musical culture, and the Hungarian Zoltan Kodaly qualifies as compatible kin from the former Eastern Bloc. But Aram Khachaturian, whose Piano Concerto was the concert's centerpiece, was both Moscow-trained and proudly from and of Armenia.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2012 | James C. Taylor
Extremely soft and incredibly far away. This was the scene as film composer Alexandre Desplat presided over one of the scoring sessions for the film "Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close. " The film's premiere was just a month away and Desplat was trying to get the sound of the piano to be even lighter than pianissimo. Cut to: pianist Jean-Yves Thibaudet, watching and listening to Desplat's direction via a video screen. The French virtuoso had been in Vienna two days before, now he was isolated in a Manhattan recording studio two floors below Desplat and the full orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1990 | ALAN ULRICH
If this late Romantic, Franco-Belgian violin repertory summons auditory images of wispy, disembodied string playing, Bell's performances should disabuse all parties of the notion. In his finest recording to date, the young American offers muscular, assertive readings, a conventional approach perhaps for Franck's 1887 opus, but a bit astonishing in the Faure and Debussy with their half-tints.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2008 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
For a while, conductor Charles Dutoit made the Los Angeles Philharmonic sound like a French orchestra Thursday at Walt Disney Concert Hall. The effect wasn't due just to the program: works by Ravel and Saint-Saens surrounding Grieg's Piano Concerto in A minor, with nattily dressed French pianist Jean-Yves Thibaudet as the soloist. It had a great deal more to do with a kind of integrated sound, a special transparency and especially a long-lined approach to phrasing.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2003 | Daniel Cariaga, Times Staff Writer
At 41, Jean-Yves Thibaudet may be the finest exponent of French pianism since the heydays of Aldo Ciccolini and Jean-Marie Darre. He demonstrated why at his revelatory recital for the Philharmonic Society of Orange County Wednesday night in Segerstrom Hall in Costa Mesa. The Lyon-born pianist's many-faceted and ear-opening second half offered unhackneyed works by Debussy, Satie and Messiaen, played with a breathtaking mastery and unerring accuracy.
NEWS
November 29, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Here's an interesting question: Let's suppose that there were actual recordings of Chopin performing his Etudes. Would you prefer to hear one, or hear a live performance by a contemporary pianist? That, in a sense, was one of several questions underlying the appearance by pianist Jean-Yves Thibaudet on Tuesday night at the Knitting Factory--an unusual element in his residency with the L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2001 | DONNA PERLMUTTER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Outside sits his metallic aubergine Porsche bearing the license plate JYPIANO. Inside, Jean-Yves Thibaudet goes gamely through various poses for a photographer while showing off his newly renovated kitchen, done in faithfully replicated 1940s Spanish tile and outfitted with such luxe items as a temperature-controlled wine storage cabinet. It's the only habitable room of his Griffith Park house, now under serious reconstruction.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2001 | MARK SWED*
America asks the world from its leading lyric sopranos. A gorgeous voice is a necessary start, but only that. We expect versatility. A true American comfortably sings the American vernacular--jazz, Broadway standards, pop, new art music--as well as French, Italian and German opera and art song. The same beautiful voice, moreover, should be as able to enliven the troubled queens of Baroque opera as the torchy heroines of contemporary American opera, to say nothing of everything in between.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1997 | Don Heckman
Think of the piano as the workhorse instrument of jazz. Its capacity to be melodic, harmonic and percussive provides it--and the music--with the means to function as soloist, accompanist or rhythm companion. And it can shift from one element to the other in the blink of an eye or, more precisely, with the touch of a key. These four new releases provide an interesting cross section of the great variety of piano jazz settings.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2008 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
For a while, conductor Charles Dutoit made the Los Angeles Philharmonic sound like a French orchestra Thursday at Walt Disney Concert Hall. The effect wasn't due just to the program: works by Ravel and Saint-Saens surrounding Grieg's Piano Concerto in A minor, with nattily dressed French pianist Jean-Yves Thibaudet as the soloist. It had a great deal more to do with a kind of integrated sound, a special transparency and especially a long-lined approach to phrasing.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1997 | Don Heckman
Think of the piano as the workhorse instrument of jazz. Its capacity to be melodic, harmonic and percussive provides it--and the music--with the means to function as soloist, accompanist or rhythm companion. And it can shift from one element to the other in the blink of an eye or, more precisely, with the touch of a key. These four new releases provide an interesting cross section of the great variety of piano jazz settings.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1994 | MARK SWED, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Jean-Yves Thibaudet welcomes a visitor to his Upper West Side penthouse, on one of the first warm days after the winter that no one stops complaining about, he is wearing faded jeans, loafers without socks, a black T-shirt with the sleeves rolled up, an expensive illuminated designer vest and a large stylish metallic crucifix. He is young, fit and looks like a million dollars. He could be a television or movie star.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1990 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In March, the phone rang in pianist Helene Wickett's Northern California home. The management of the Minnesota Symphony wanted to know whether she could play Mozart's Concerto No. 27 with the orchestra and conductor Edo de Waart--on 24 hours' notice. Wickett said yes. Such is the life of a professional trying to make a career from the West Coast. "It was lots of fun," she said in a recent phone interview from her home in Redwood City, San Mateo County.
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