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Jeane J Kirkpatrick

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March 4, 1988 | From a Times Staff Writer
Jeane J. Kirkpatrick, former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, endorsed Kansas Sen. Bob Dole in the Republican presidential race Thursday, saying he inspired "more confidence" in his ability to provide strong world leadership than did Vice President George Bush. "I have confidence that Bob Dole knows how better to protect our security and at the same time seize opportunities for building better relations (with the Soviet Union)," Kirkpatrick said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 2006 | Johanna Neuman, Times Staff Writer
Jeane J. Kirkpatrick, a staunch Reagan-era anti-Communist who infused American foreign policy with firm conviction as the first woman to serve as the U.S. ambassador to the U.N., has died. She was 80. Kirkpatrick died in her sleep late Thursday at her home in Bethesda, Md., according to an announcement Friday on the website of the American Enterprise Institute. The conservative think tank, where Kirkpatrick worked for several decades, called her "a great patriot and champion of freedom."
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NEWS
May 17, 1985 | Associated Press
The Senate on Thursday confirmed the nomination of Vernon A. Walters to succeed Jeane J. Kirkpatrick as U.S. ambassador to the United Nations by voice vote and without debate. Since 1981 Walters, 68, has served the Reagan Administration as ambassador-at-large, visiting more than 100 countries on diplomatic missions that often were cloaked in secrecy. He speaks eight languages and has served as an interpreter for four presidents.
NEWS
April 28, 1999 | Associated Press
Elizabeth Hanford Dole picked up $500,000 and the endorsement of former U.N. Ambassador Jeane J. Kirkpatrick at the first fund-raiser of her presidential campaign Tuesday. The modest total failed to dampen speculation about her ability to compete with George W. Bush's fund-raising machine. The Texas governor, by contrast, sopped up nearly $300,000 a day in the first 28 days of his campaign--never bothering with expensive, time-consuming fund-raising events.
NEWS
March 24, 1987 | Associated Press
Former U.N. Ambassador Jeane J. Kirkpatrick said Monday that she would not seek the GOP nomination for President or vice president in 1988. "I don't think about it," she said at a cocktail party before the annual chairman's dinner for the Westchester County Republican Party. "I am not a candidate. I've said it repeatedly and consistently." She declined to discuss whom she would support, saying only the "time will come."
NEWS
May 18, 1987
Jeane J. Kirkpatrick, former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, said she would consider running in the 1988 Republican presidential primary as a favorite daughter candidate in Maryland. At the annual meeting of the Maryland Republican Party in Ocean City, Md., Kirkpatrick told reporters that she saw no reason to rule out such a candidacy if the party drafted her. "I've never thought about it," she said. "It's a very nice compliment, obviously. I see no reason why not."
NEWS
May 20, 1987
Jeane J. Kirkpatrick, former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, predicted that Iraq's attack on the guided missile frigate Stark will have no long-term effect on American military operations in the Middle East. "A few of our ships in the area are a little more alert--that's what I think will result," Kirkpatrick said after a speech at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. "Now they're going to believe that accidents will happen. I don't think it will damage U.S.-Iraqi relations."
NEWS
April 28, 1999 | Associated Press
Elizabeth Hanford Dole picked up $500,000 and the endorsement of former U.N. Ambassador Jeane J. Kirkpatrick at the first fund-raiser of her presidential campaign Tuesday. The modest total failed to dampen speculation about her ability to compete with George W. Bush's fund-raising machine. The Texas governor, by contrast, sopped up nearly $300,000 a day in the first 28 days of his campaign--never bothering with expensive, time-consuming fund-raising events.
NEWS
June 30, 1988 | From a Times Staff Writer
New Jersey Gov. Thomas H. Kean, who literally wrote the book on broadening the Republican Party through "The Politics of Inclusion," will deliver the keynote speech at the GOP National Convention in August, GOP National Chairman Frank J. Fahrenkopf Jr. announced Wednesday in Los Angeles. Vice President George Bush made the selection personally, Bush's office said. But the announcement drew an immediate blast from Sen. Gordon J. Humphrey (R-N. H.
NEWS
October 27, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
Her voice tinged with regret, Jeane J. Kirkpatrick, former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, said Monday that she decided not to run for President because she is a woman, a "new Republican" and without experience in running for office. "My family was for it to a man," she said, referring to her husband and three sons. "I made the decision completely on my own.
NEWS
July 28, 1994 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
In an unprecedented partisan broadside, four of the Republican Party's biggest foreign policy guns raked President Clinton on Wednesday for undermining U.S. prestige abroad, weakening U.S. defenses and--most of all--being inconsistent in his leadership. "With Haiti, the Administration seems to have changed policies more often than most of us change our shirts--and it's July in Washington," said former Secretary of State James A.
NEWS
August 17, 1988 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
With Ronald Reagan having made his appearance and ridden off into the sunset, Republicans heard two sharply divergent depictions of the future of their party Tuesday night. The first came from the official keynote speaker, New Jersey Gov. Thomas H. Kean, who opened the George Bush part of the GOP convention with a call for the Republican Party to use "Reagan-Bush principles" to combat social ills that the Reagan Administration has been widely accused of ignoring.
NEWS
June 30, 1988 | From a Times Staff Writer
New Jersey Gov. Thomas H. Kean, who literally wrote the book on broadening the Republican Party through "The Politics of Inclusion," will deliver the keynote speech at the GOP National Convention in August, GOP National Chairman Frank J. Fahrenkopf Jr. announced Wednesday in Los Angeles. Vice President George Bush made the selection personally, Bush's office said. But the announcement drew an immediate blast from Sen. Gordon J. Humphrey (R-N. H.
NEWS
May 17, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writers
President Reagan has personally approved a new U.S. offer to Gen. Manuel A. Noriega that would require the Panamanian strongman to leave his country for a year but apparently would allow him to retain effective control of the government, Administration sources said Monday. The sources said that Noriega is expected to accept or reject the proposal within the next day or two.
NEWS
May 13, 1988 | Robert Shogan
Two prominent Republicans, former Secretary of State Alexander M. Haig Jr. and former U.N. Ambassador Jeane J. Kirkpatrick, are likely to be anything but prominent at the August GOP convention in New Orleans, if Vice President George Bush has anything to say about it. Bush, who as the presumptive nominee gets to call most of the shots at the conclave, has already passed the word to convention planners that he wants neither to play a significant role.
NEWS
March 4, 1988 | From a Times Staff Writer
Jeane J. Kirkpatrick, former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, endorsed Kansas Sen. Bob Dole in the Republican presidential race Thursday, saying he inspired "more confidence" in his ability to provide strong world leadership than did Vice President George Bush. "I have confidence that Bob Dole knows how better to protect our security and at the same time seize opportunities for building better relations (with the Soviet Union)," Kirkpatrick said.
NEWS
May 13, 1988 | Robert Shogan
Two prominent Republicans, former Secretary of State Alexander M. Haig Jr. and former U.N. Ambassador Jeane J. Kirkpatrick, are likely to be anything but prominent at the August GOP convention in New Orleans, if Vice President George Bush has anything to say about it. Bush, who as the presumptive nominee gets to call most of the shots at the conclave, has already passed the word to convention planners that he wants neither to play a significant role.
NEWS
October 12, 1987 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
Jeane J. Kirkpatrick, visiting Managua on a White House mission, urged anti-Sandinista political forces Sunday to use their promised new freedoms to "struggle for a democratic Nicaragua." "The future of Nicaragua depends as much on the people as on the government, because liberty has to be demanded and used, and democracy has to be built by the very people who are going to enjoy it," said Kirkpatrick, the former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations.
NEWS
October 27, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
Her voice tinged with regret, Jeane J. Kirkpatrick, former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, said Monday that she decided not to run for President because she is a woman, a "new Republican" and without experience in running for office. "My family was for it to a man," she said, referring to her husband and three sons. "I made the decision completely on my own.
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