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Jeanette Winterson

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March 15, 2012
One of the most beloved fabulist novelists working today, Jeanette Winterson tackles her own reality in her new memoir, "Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal?" On a search for her biological mother, Winterson confronts the various paths her childhood took, from being raised by a religious zealot who kept a gun in the dresser to growing up in a rough industrial town in England. Pondering her sexuality and other core parts of her identity, the author studies what experiences formed her and who she might've become without her past.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2013 | By Hector Tobar, Los Angeles Times
Jeanette Winterson's new novel is a strange and spare piece of horror writing about witch trials that arrives on these shores just in time for Halloween. "The Daylight Gate" is based on a real-life story of the Pendle Witches, men and women charged in 1612 with using their alleged craft to murder innocents in Lancashire in northwest England. Winterson re-creates the turbulent times that fed the anti-witch hysteria. King James, obsessed with the idea of witchcraft, has ascended to the throne.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2013 | By Hector Tobar, Los Angeles Times
Jeanette Winterson's new novel is a strange and spare piece of horror writing about witch trials that arrives on these shores just in time for Halloween. "The Daylight Gate" is based on a real-life story of the Pendle Witches, men and women charged in 1612 with using their alleged craft to murder innocents in Lancashire in northwest England. Winterson re-creates the turbulent times that fed the anti-witch hysteria. King James, obsessed with the idea of witchcraft, has ascended to the throne.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
The Forward Prize for poetry was thrust into the news last month when a poet withdrew from consideration after it was revealed he had plagiarized some earlier work. The British prize , worth more than $16,000, was presented Tuesday night to Michael Symmons Roberts for his collection "Drysalter. " Each of the 150 poems in the collection is exactly 15 lines long; the title refers to an 18th-century store stocking poisons, powders, gums and drugs -- "with a nod, too, to the Psalter," as is noted on the prize's website.
BOOKS
February 21, 1993 | RICHARD EDER
"Don Juan falls seriously in love" is a short way to sum up Jeanette Winterson's novel of quick changes and askew effects. It plays in two registers: a series of wry, near-absurdist seductions, and a lush story of passion in a tragic setting. Each register feeds occasionally into the other. A fierceness once in a while comes through the irony; a note of self-mockery is heard in the passion. Mostly, though, they are so far apart that the readers' attention flutters about for a perch.
BOOKS
April 13, 1997 | AUDREY BILGER, Audrey Bilger teaches English at Claremont McKenna College
"Gut Symmetries," the title sticks in one's throat, the clipped percussion of the first word clashing with the sibilant wave of its partner. When I first heard the title of Jeanette Winterson's new novel over the phone last fall, I thought I had a bad connection.
BOOKS
March 31, 1996 | Victoria Redel, Redel is the author, most recently of "Where the Road Bottoms Out," a collection of short stories from Knopf
It was a sign of lonely maturation for me as a reader when I came to understand that the writers I most loved, whose poems or stories I read talismanically over and over, whose language helped me construct the truths by which I lived, were often people I would not want to spend five minutes chatting with, let alone engaging in any conversation of social or personal substance. First this made me sad. Then it made me brazen.
BOOKS
April 23, 1995 | Rikki Ducornet, Rikki Ducornet is the author of "The Jade Cabinet."
"Art and Lies" opens with light, a generative thread that precipitates the sprawling world of matter: A train, wheels, overcoats, windows, brooches and a man. Homeless, loveless, self-hating, remorseful--he is a shadowman too self-absorbed to notice the light that burns his clothes and illuminates his face, the light pouring down his shoulders with biblical zeal.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
The Forward Prize for poetry was thrust into the news last month when a poet withdrew from consideration after it was revealed he had plagiarized some earlier work. The British prize , worth more than $16,000, was presented Tuesday night to Michael Symmons Roberts for his collection "Drysalter. " Each of the 150 poems in the collection is exactly 15 lines long; the title refers to an 18th-century store stocking poisons, powders, gums and drugs -- "with a nod, too, to the Psalter," as is noted on the prize's website.
BOOKS
October 30, 2005 | Susan Salter Reynolds
Reviewer's note: Publishers occasionally ask a group of authors to write on a single subject (wedding cakes, the seven deadly sins). Usually the results are stilted, but Canongate's bright new series on myth is so far an exception. Believing myths are the DNA of literature and must be retold to stay alive, the publisher asked several writers to choose their favorites and create something new from them.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2012
One of the most beloved fabulist novelists working today, Jeanette Winterson tackles her own reality in her new memoir, "Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal?" On a search for her biological mother, Winterson confronts the various paths her childhood took, from being raised by a religious zealot who kept a gun in the dresser to growing up in a rough industrial town in England. Pondering her sexuality and other core parts of her identity, the author studies what experiences formed her and who she might've become without her past.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2008 | Kai Maristed, Special to The Times
Maybe a prodigy, certainly a rebel with a divine knack for metaphoric invention -- this might describe Jeanette Winterson as a child. In her self-exploratory debut novel, "Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit," the protagonist, like the author, was given up for adoption to a rigorously evangelical couple and discovers her powers as a revivalist speaker shortly before discovering her lesbian love for another girl.
BOOKS
October 30, 2005 | Susan Salter Reynolds
Reviewer's note: Publishers occasionally ask a group of authors to write on a single subject (wedding cakes, the seven deadly sins). Usually the results are stilted, but Canongate's bright new series on myth is so far an exception. Believing myths are the DNA of literature and must be retold to stay alive, the publisher asked several writers to choose their favorites and create something new from them.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2005 | Merle Rubin, Special to The Times
One could easily say that Jeanette Winterson's novels defy classification, that there is no such thing as a typical Winterson novel. Yet, on closer examination, what one finds throughout her work is a strongly personal, often autobiographical strain (the essence of her arresting first novel, "Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit") and an unusual imaginative sensitivity to the literary and historical past (yielding such treasures as "The Passion" and "Sexing the Cherry."
BOOKS
April 13, 1997 | AUDREY BILGER, Audrey Bilger teaches English at Claremont McKenna College
"Gut Symmetries," the title sticks in one's throat, the clipped percussion of the first word clashing with the sibilant wave of its partner. When I first heard the title of Jeanette Winterson's new novel over the phone last fall, I thought I had a bad connection.
BOOKS
March 31, 1996 | Victoria Redel, Redel is the author, most recently of "Where the Road Bottoms Out," a collection of short stories from Knopf
It was a sign of lonely maturation for me as a reader when I came to understand that the writers I most loved, whose poems or stories I read talismanically over and over, whose language helped me construct the truths by which I lived, were often people I would not want to spend five minutes chatting with, let alone engaging in any conversation of social or personal substance. First this made me sad. Then it made me brazen.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2008 | Kai Maristed, Special to The Times
Maybe a prodigy, certainly a rebel with a divine knack for metaphoric invention -- this might describe Jeanette Winterson as a child. In her self-exploratory debut novel, "Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit," the protagonist, like the author, was given up for adoption to a rigorously evangelical couple and discovers her powers as a revivalist speaker shortly before discovering her lesbian love for another girl.
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