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Jeanne Dielman

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2009 | Sam Adams
Chantal Akerman's 1975 masterpiece "Jeanne Dielman, 23, quai du Commerce 1080 Bruxelles" is a 3 1/2 -hour movie in which nothing happens. But the nothing that happens is what occupies the vast majority of our waking hours. Set almost entirely in the titular one-bedroom apartment, the movie shadows the quotidian movements of a widowed single mother (Delphine Seyrig) over the course of three days. She boils potatoes, shines shoes, knits a sweater for her uncommunicative teenage son (Jan Decorte)
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2010 | By Dennis Lim
Marco Ferreri, who died in 1997, was something of an odd man out among the Italian auteurs who made a global impression during the golden age of art cinema. Despite his attention-getting knack for provocation, he never quite crossed over to American audiences, and his reputation has fallen into eclipse over the years. Ferreri had a lot in common with his more popular countrymen. Like Federico Fellini, he had a penchant for the absurd. Like Pier Paolo Pasolini, he reveled in transgression.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2004 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
Near the end of the astonishing film "Jeanne Dielman, 23 Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles" a woman makes a meat loaf. Standing at a table in her kitchen, Jeanne Dielman cracks open an egg onto a lump of ground beef, sprinkles in some flour and begins kneading. There's no music playing in the kitchen, no talk radio, no sounds of children playing, no sense of life filling the emptiness -- just the squish, squish, squish of meat squeezing through Jeanne's fingers.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2010 | By Dennis Lim
Chantal Akerman's great subject is dislocation: the difficulty of fitting in, of feeling at home, of being. It's a theme this remarkable filmmaker -- born in Belgium but a professional nomad much of her life -- explored with focus and ferocity in the first decade of her career. That period is the subject of "Chantal Akerman in the Seventies" ($44.95), a new three-disc set from Criterion's budget line Eclipse due out this week. Like Orson Welles, Akerman made her first masterpiece, "Jeanne Dielman, 23 Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles" (1975)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2010 | By Dennis Lim
Chantal Akerman's great subject is dislocation: the difficulty of fitting in, of feeling at home, of being. It's a theme this remarkable filmmaker -- born in Belgium but a professional nomad much of her life -- explored with focus and ferocity in the first decade of her career. That period is the subject of "Chantal Akerman in the Seventies" ($44.95), a new three-disc set from Criterion's budget line Eclipse due out this week. Like Orson Welles, Akerman made her first masterpiece, "Jeanne Dielman, 23 Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles" (1975)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1987 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
Belgian-born, Paris-based Chantal Akerman has long been highly regarded in Europe yet remains all but unknown in the United States. Her 3 1/2-hour-long "Jeanne Dielman, 23 Quai du Commerce--1800 Bruxelles" proved a shocker at the 1977 Filmex, an austere and demanding commentary on what "woman's work" can encompass. But it has been shown only rarely since.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1986 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
Surprise is an element as tidily eliminated from "Dancing in the Dark" (at the Westside Pavilion) as dust is from Edna Cormick's compulsive, sacrificial life. From the first affectless moments with Edna (Martha Henry) in a psychiatric hospital, we have a pretty good idea of the enormity of the event that brought her there.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2010 | By Dennis Lim
Marco Ferreri, who died in 1997, was something of an odd man out among the Italian auteurs who made a global impression during the golden age of art cinema. Despite his attention-getting knack for provocation, he never quite crossed over to American audiences, and his reputation has fallen into eclipse over the years. Ferreri had a lot in common with his more popular countrymen. Like Federico Fellini, he had a penchant for the absurd. Like Pier Paolo Pasolini, he reveled in transgression.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2004
The following information was inadvertently left out of Saturday's story on a retrospective of the work of filmmaker Chantal Akerman. Where: UCLA Film and Television Archive, James Bridges Theater, 1409 Melnitz Hall, UCLA campus, Westwood When: "Jeanne Dielman, 23 Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles," with Akerman in person, Tuesday, 7 p.m. "Night and Day" and "From the Other Side," March 19, 7:30 p.m. Price: $5 to $8 Contact: (310) 206-8013 or www.cinema.ucla.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 1985 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
Since it's often claimed that the greatest loss in the history of the cinema is the 32 reels that Metro cut from Erich Von Stroheim's "Greed" (1923), it is important to remember that the 10 that remain were enough to get it voted as one of the 12 best films of all time by an international jury at the Brussels Exposition of 1958. As tragic as the fate of "Greed" was, it remains, even in truncated form, timelessly dazzling.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2009 | Sam Adams
Chantal Akerman's 1975 masterpiece "Jeanne Dielman, 23, quai du Commerce 1080 Bruxelles" is a 3 1/2 -hour movie in which nothing happens. But the nothing that happens is what occupies the vast majority of our waking hours. Set almost entirely in the titular one-bedroom apartment, the movie shadows the quotidian movements of a widowed single mother (Delphine Seyrig) over the course of three days. She boils potatoes, shines shoes, knits a sweater for her uncommunicative teenage son (Jan Decorte)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2004 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
Near the end of the astonishing film "Jeanne Dielman, 23 Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles" a woman makes a meat loaf. Standing at a table in her kitchen, Jeanne Dielman cracks open an egg onto a lump of ground beef, sprinkles in some flour and begins kneading. There's no music playing in the kitchen, no talk radio, no sounds of children playing, no sense of life filling the emptiness -- just the squish, squish, squish of meat squeezing through Jeanne's fingers.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1987 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
Belgian-born, Paris-based Chantal Akerman has long been highly regarded in Europe yet remains all but unknown in the United States. Her 3 1/2-hour-long "Jeanne Dielman, 23 Quai du Commerce--1800 Bruxelles" proved a shocker at the 1977 Filmex, an austere and demanding commentary on what "woman's work" can encompass. But it has been shown only rarely since.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1986 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
Surprise is an element as tidily eliminated from "Dancing in the Dark" (at the Westside Pavilion) as dust is from Edna Cormick's compulsive, sacrificial life. From the first affectless moments with Edna (Martha Henry) in a psychiatric hospital, we have a pretty good idea of the enormity of the event that brought her there.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2009 | Susan King
Think of it as a progressive film festival, not like in pushing artistic boundaries, more like how film fans will have to follow the Second Annual Japan Film Festival Los Angeles around town. With 22 films making either their North American or at least their L.A. premiere, the festival takes place Friday through next Thursday at the Monica 4-Plex, then moves to the Downtown Independent April 17 to 19, and winds up April 25 and 26 at the Starplex Cinema in Irvine.
NEWS
March 4, 2004 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
For over 35 years, Belgium's Chantal Akerman has trusted more in the camera than in dialogue to explore the human condition. She has done so with much wit, clarity and compassion, and in many genres. Akerman's images and camera movements are fraught with meaning and emotion, and while she can be a demanding artist, she is also accessible and unpretentious.
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