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Jeanne Jackson

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BUSINESS
January 2, 2000 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN
Who will make big news in the business world this year? Who will emerge from relative obscurity to become a major player? To start the new year, Times business reporters selected people from their beats who they believe will be among those to watch in 2000--in Southern California, across the country and around the world. Some are well known, having made big news in previous years. Others are not exactly household names but nevertheless are likely to make a major impact in their fields.
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BUSINESS
January 2, 2000 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN
Who will make big news in the business world this year? Who will emerge from relative obscurity to become a major player? To start the new year, Times business reporters selected people from their beats who they believe will be among those to watch in 2000--in Southern California, across the country and around the world. Some are well known, having made big news in previous years. Others are not exactly household names but nevertheless are likely to make a major impact in their fields.
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OPINION
August 15, 1999
Jeanne Jackson's Aug. 7 Voices column dealing with what some call the "yuppification" of Manhattan Beach is right on the mark, and many here share her dismay. It was a pretty accurate report, although she neglected mention of the danger to us old folks as we dodge careening baby strollers, propelled by a growing population of nannies. BOB WHITE Manhattan Beach
BUSINESS
March 3, 2000 |
Most major retailers on Thursday reported robust February sales that defied a volatile stock market, rising interest rates and a jump in oil prices--any one of which might have slowed Americans' shopping euphoria. Although there was some concern that spending would slow in 2000 from last year's strong pace, in fact sales at many chains were better than expected in February. The Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi retail sales index, which tracks sales at about 80 U.S. retail chains, rose 5.
BUSINESS
November 23, 2000 | TODD PACK, ORLANDO SENTINEL
Amazon.com has been dubbed the "Wal-Mart of the Internet," a virtual superstore selling everything from "Harry Potter" books to potting benches. But it could lose its standing to a start-up that promises an even wider selection at everyday low prices. Before long, the Wal-Mart of the Internet may be . . . Wal-Mart. Wal-Mart Stores Inc., the world's No.
BUSINESS
December 25, 2000 | AIMEE PICCHI, BLOOMBERG NEWS
A year ago, Wal-Mart Stores Inc. and America Online Inc. heralded a new Internet service geared toward customers of the world's biggest retailer, and rural shoppers in particular. The co-branded service would bridge the "digital divide" that had thus far kept many rural Americans offline, the companies said. It would offer local dial-up numbers in towns that had none and be priced for the "value-conscious." One year has passed since the Dec.
NEWS
March 28, 2004 | Nicholas K. Geranios, Associated Press Writer
As you drive across the mile-long bridge that spans Lake Pend Oreille, the charming center of Sandpoint appears. For many, it has been love at first sight. As a result, real estate prices are booming in the former logging community. Although prices are low compared to Aspen or Sun Valley, housing costs at Schweitzer Mountain ski area or on the lake has skyrocketed in the last couple of years. "The quality of life here is exceptional," said Rich Faletto, who operates a real estate office here.
BUSINESS
December 12, 1999 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is an open secret this holiday shopping season that many of the retailers poised to do well on the Web didn't start out with dot-com in their names. Sears, Roebuck & Co., J.C. Penney Co., Gap Inc. and other shopping mall stalwarts are successfully carving out territory in cyberspace using time-honored retail tools: exclusive products, strong customer service and trusted brands. They aren't yet considered dominant Internet players, in the way Amazon.com rules the online book business.
NEWS
December 9, 1999 | JEAN MERL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nestled along a southern stretch of Santa Monica Bay, Manhattan Beach was for decades a middle-class ocean lover's paradise. It was a place where a teacher's salary or an aerospace worker's wage could pay the mortgage on a comfortable, if modest, house within walking or bicycling distance of the beach. Let the rich have their Malibus and Newport Beaches--Manhattan Beach's affordability made possible a seashore lifestyle that was famously laid-back and unpretentious.
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