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January 29, 1990 | From United Press International
Copyright Suit Filed Against 'Look Who's Talking': A suit filed in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles accuses writer-director Amy Heckerling of taking the inspiration for the hit movie "Look Who's Talking" from a student film. The suit seeks $20 million in damages from Tri-Star Pictures for violating the copyright of Jeanne Meyers and Rita Stern, two former students of the American Film Institute, who claim to have made a film with the same plot.
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BUSINESS
January 29, 1990 | From United Press International
Copyright Suit Filed Against 'Look Who's Talking': A suit filed in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles accuses writer-director Amy Heckerling of taking the inspiration for the hit movie "Look Who's Talking" from a student film. The suit seeks $20 million in damages from Tri-Star Pictures for violating the copyright of Jeanne Meyers and Rita Stern, two former students of the American Film Institute, who claim to have made a film with the same plot.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1990 | JACK MATHEWS, TIMES FILM EDITOR
Writer-director Amy Heckerling took her inspiration for her hit movie "Look Who's Talking" from a 20-minute student film and other materials supplied her four years before "Look Who's Talking" was released last fall, according to a $20-million lawsuit filed against her and Tri-Star Pictures Tuesday. The suit accuses Tri-Star, which is distributing "Look Who's Talking," of conspiring with Heckerling to infringe Jeanne Meyers and Rita Stern's copyright.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1990 | JACK MATHEWS, TIMES FILM EDITOR
Writer-director Amy Heckerling took her inspiration for her hit movie "Look Who's Talking" from a 20-minute student film and other materials supplied her four years before "Look Who's Talking" was released last fall, according to a $20-million lawsuit filed against her and Tri-Star Pictures Tuesday. The suit accuses Tri-Star, which is distributing "Look Who's Talking," of conspiring with Heckerling to infringe Jeanne Meyers and Rita Stern's copyright.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1991 | SHAUNA SNOW, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Look Who's Settling: Tri-Star Pictures has settled a copyright-infringement lawsuit in Los Angeles with two writers who charged that the film company and writer Amy Heckerling plagiarized the premise for the 1989 multimillion-dollar smash film "Look Who's Talking." Writers Jeanne Meyers and Rita Stern filed suit against Tri-Star 18 months ago, claiming the plot for the movie was lifted from a 1984 student film they created titled "Special Delivery."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1994
Suzanne Muchnic's recent coverage ("Remapping the Local Art Scene," March 9) of the ever-changing, nomadic nature of the Los Angeles art world was extensive, but not encompassing. We are all delighted at the prospect of another strong cultural center in Santa Monica, as Bergamot Station promises to be. However, we feel it in the best interest of your readers to make them aware of a longstanding arts mecca where many changes have occurred in the last several months. The Broadway Gallery Complex in the 2000 block of Broadway near Cloverfield was established in 1988 when Venice Artwalk co-founder Ruth Bloom and partner Jeanne Meyers opened Meyers/Bloom Gallery.
BUSINESS
December 8, 1989 | JANE APPLEGATE
If you think owning an art gallery means holding elegant Champagne receptions for sophisticated clients and fascinating artists every day, think again. Owning a fine art gallery is like running any other small business: It's risky, expensive and challenging. "Too many people go into this business because they think it's going to be fun," said Karl Borenstein, who owns a 7-year-old Santa Monica art gallery bearing his name.
NEWS
January 23, 1989 | Marylouise Oates
Look to the Century Plaza on Feb. 8 for a star-packed evening. Everybody loves Julie Andrews and Blake Edwards--and they will receive WAIF's National Humanitarian Award that night for their efforts in finding adoptive homes for "hard-to-place" kids. These are children who are handicapped, older or members of minorities. When Jane Russell, an adoptive parent herself, founded WAIF more than 30 years ago, those were just the kids she wanted to help.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1992 | SHAUNA SNOW
It's been less than two months since Kent Twitchell and his "Old Woman of the Freeway" mural prevailed in the courts, but his attorney is already using the precedent set by that case in the hopes of bringing back another L.A. mural that was recently painted over. The work in question is "Work of the Heavens," a 46-by-19-foot mural in West Hollywood painted by Russell Carlton.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1991 | BARBARA ISENBERG, Barbara Isenberg writes about the arts for The Times.
No doubt about it. In Hollywood, art is the scene. It's what industry people discuss over pasta checca and seared ahi. It represents beauty, wealth, passion, power, culture, status and celebrity. It's about deal-making and high-rolling. The players are glamorous. So is the game. From Fran and Ray Stark's museum-like sculpture garden to the beginning photography and print collections of young agents and producers, movie and TV people are involved in the art world as never before.
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