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Jeanne Moreau

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1993 | GENE SEYMOUR, NEWSDAY
In "The Summer House," a British comedy of wedding plans gone awry, Joan Plowright, the dour mother of the dorky groom, answers a knock at her door. There, slouching at the door, is the bride's aunt. After a few tense seconds, she slips a pint of whiskey out from under her coat, offering to share its contents with Plowright. The aunt's half-pout-half-grin suggests both allure and danger. The deep, dark eyes suggest boundless possibilities for mischief and risk.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2006 | Mark Olsen, Special to The Times
ON a dreary, rainy morning in Toronto, French filmmaker Francois Ozon reads the newspaper and sips a diet soda as he waits for Jeanne Moreau. One of the grandes dames of European art cinema, Moreau has starred in such classics as "Jules and Jim" and "Diary of a Chambermaid" and has worked with a diverse group of directors that includes Michelangelo Antonioni, Orson Welles and Rainer Werner Fassbinder.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2004 | Desson Thomson, Washington Post
When she comes to town this weekend, Jeanne Moreau will be able to waltz through downtown Washington or Silver Spring, Md., without eliciting many backward glances. Passersby will register a well-preserved, fashionably dressed woman with a distinctive face. But a movie star? Extremely unlikely. The world belongs to Julia and J.Lo now. And Moreau, here to present two of her long-ago films at an American Film Institute retrospective, is a luminary from another era. She turns 76 today.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2004 | Desson Thomson, Washington Post
When she comes to town this weekend, Jeanne Moreau will be able to waltz through downtown Washington or Silver Spring, Md., without eliciting many backward glances. Passersby will register a well-preserved, fashionably dressed woman with a distinctive face. But a movie star? Extremely unlikely. The world belongs to Julia and J.Lo now. And Moreau, here to present two of her long-ago films at an American Film Institute retrospective, is a luminary from another era. She turns 76 today.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1996 | Kevin Thomas, Kevin Thomas is a Times film critic
Hearing first that seductive, husky voice--which has become familiar through scores of films since 1961's "Jules and Jim"--does not prepare you for the sight of Jeanne Moreau, even if you've been acquainted with her for more than 25 years. That's because she's become dramatically slimmer than she's been in years, and only six weeks ago she cut off her trademark long hair. The result is a youthful gamine look that matches her indomitable zest for life.
NEWS
June 1, 1997 | Kevin Thomas
This 1993 British comedy boasts Jeanne Moreau as the exotic Lili, who descends upon Croydon, a staid London suburb, circa 1959. She proves to be the unexpected companion of the elderly mother of the obtuse jerk soon to wed the daughter of Lili's lifelong friend Monica. Also starring Lena Headey, pictured (Cinemax Monday at 1:30 p.m.).
NEWS
September 6, 1992 | Associated Press
French actress Jeanne Moreau and director Francis Ford Coppola will receive Golden Lion awards for their careers' work, officials of the Venice Film Festival said Friday. The awards will be presented on Sept. 12. The festival's commission also granted the award to Paolo Villaggio, an Italian comic actor. Coppola, 53, an Oscar-winning director, screenwriter and producer, directed "The Godfather" series as well as "The Conversation" and "American Graffiti."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1995 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Laurent Heynemann's delightful yet acerbic and exceedingly wise "The Old Lady Who Walked in the Sea," Jeanne Moreau looms into view like a galleon at full mast, strolling slowly in the surf, not in a bathing suit but in dramatic attire and a big hat. Moreau's Lady M, who walks with a cane, is trying to soothe her arthritic hip, but the brazen glamour of her exaggerated wardrobe, jewels and wigs proclaims loudly her defiance of age.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1996 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With "The Proprietor," Ismail Merchant has created a beautiful film for Jeanne Moreau, only to get carried away with adoration for her just when clarity, specificity and common sense are most needed to anchor its flights of fancy. As a result, Moreau's incisive, reflective depiction of a famous novelist coming to terms with her past blurs into fairy tale, undercutting the impact of a film of admirable elegance and civility, attributes as beguiling as Moreau herself.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1998 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In connection with the tribute to Jeanne Moreau tonight at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, the Equinoxe Assn., of which Moreau is president, will present four films that it helped develop. They will be shown Friday and Saturday at LACMA, which itself will launch a series of films starring Moreau. The LACMA Moreau series will begin Sunday with a 7 p.m. screening of Jacques Demy's "Bay of Angels" (1962), with Moreau in attendance.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2002 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Of all the performances that have made Jeanne Moreau revered among actresses, her work in "Bay of Angels" is one of the most compelling and one of the least seen. Directed in 1963 by Jacques Demy, "Bay of Angels" has been unavailable theatrically in this country for nearly 40 years. But a new 35-millimeter wide-screen print has been struck, and this celebrated film is once again open for business, playing at the Nuart in West Los Angeles for one week.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1998 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Few actresses can match Jeanne Moreau's four decades of international stardom. But not until Thursday's elegant tribute to her had the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences honored a French actress in such a manner, observed academy President Robert Rehme.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1998 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In connection with the tribute to Jeanne Moreau tonight at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, the Equinoxe Assn., of which Moreau is president, will present four films that it helped develop. They will be shown Friday and Saturday at LACMA, which itself will launch a series of films starring Moreau. The LACMA Moreau series will begin Sunday with a 7 p.m. screening of Jacques Demy's "Bay of Angels" (1962), with Moreau in attendance.
NEWS
June 1, 1997 | Kevin Thomas
This 1993 British comedy boasts Jeanne Moreau as the exotic Lili, who descends upon Croydon, a staid London suburb, circa 1959. She proves to be the unexpected companion of the elderly mother of the obtuse jerk soon to wed the daughter of Lili's lifelong friend Monica. Also starring Lena Headey, pictured (Cinemax Monday at 1:30 p.m.).
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1996 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With "The Proprietor," Ismail Merchant has created a beautiful film for Jeanne Moreau, only to get carried away with adoration for her just when clarity, specificity and common sense are most needed to anchor its flights of fancy. As a result, Moreau's incisive, reflective depiction of a famous novelist coming to terms with her past blurs into fairy tale, undercutting the impact of a film of admirable elegance and civility, attributes as beguiling as Moreau herself.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1996 | Kevin Thomas, Kevin Thomas is a Times film critic
Hearing first that seductive, husky voice--which has become familiar through scores of films since 1961's "Jules and Jim"--does not prepare you for the sight of Jeanne Moreau, even if you've been acquainted with her for more than 25 years. That's because she's become dramatically slimmer than she's been in years, and only six weeks ago she cut off her trademark long hair. The result is a youthful gamine look that matches her indomitable zest for life.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2002 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Of all the performances that have made Jeanne Moreau revered among actresses, her work in "Bay of Angels" is one of the most compelling and one of the least seen. Directed in 1963 by Jacques Demy, "Bay of Angels" has been unavailable theatrically in this country for nearly 40 years. But a new 35-millimeter wide-screen print has been struck, and this celebrated film is once again open for business, playing at the Nuart in West Los Angeles for one week.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1995 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Laurent Heynemann's delightful yet acerbic and exceedingly wise "The Old Lady Who Walked in the Sea," Jeanne Moreau looms into view like a galleon at full mast, strolling slowly in the surf, not in a bathing suit but in dramatic attire and a big hat. Moreau's Lady M, who walks with a cane, is trying to soothe her arthritic hip, but the brazen glamour of her exaggerated wardrobe, jewels and wigs proclaims loudly her defiance of age.
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