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Jeanne Ray

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1985
It's a sad day when a post office manager cannot accept general criticism of the post office by an employee without personalizing it, and compounding the problem by taking away the employee's right of freedom of speech by way of a written reprimand. What each individual thinks, feels, and expresses either verbally or by way of a letter to the editor, has nothing to do with the job performance. The manager should be embarrassed. JEANNE RAY Harbor City
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1990
Tom Gorman, as usual, wrote a wonderful story on the break in the aqueduct. ("The Big Break," Oct. 7). I was particularly interested in the fears of the water districts if we had an earthquake, and the cities that would be without water. Lest we all forget, the Gregory Canyon Landfill site abuts the aqueduct, and the water authorities have been warning the county that if there was a break in the aqueduct above this site because of an earthquake, it would flood the landfill and send thousands of tons of pollutants into the underground aquifer, and down the San Luis Rey River, to Oceanside, causing a monumental environmental accident.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1990
In your article on the three proposed dump sites in North San Diego County ("County Urged to Buy 3 New Landfill Sites," Jan. 25), you erroneously refer to a decision by the County Board of Supervisors on acceptance of a dump site. Actually, the only member of the Board of Supervisors who will vote on the sites is Supervisor John MacDonald. We have already been told that the other board members will go along with his decision, since it is his district. Since this is the case, perhaps having a board of five members is an antiquated idea.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1990
In your article on the three proposed dump sites in North San Diego County ("County Urged to Buy 3 New Landfill Sites," Jan. 25), you erroneously refer to a decision by the County Board of Supervisors on acceptance of a dump site. Actually, the only member of the Board of Supervisors who will vote on the sites is Supervisor John MacDonald. We have already been told that the other board members will go along with his decision, since it is his district. Since this is the case, perhaps having a board of five members is an antiquated idea.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1990
Tom Gorman, as usual, wrote a wonderful story on the break in the aqueduct. ("The Big Break," Oct. 7). I was particularly interested in the fears of the water districts if we had an earthquake, and the cities that would be without water. Lest we all forget, the Gregory Canyon Landfill site abuts the aqueduct, and the water authorities have been warning the county that if there was a break in the aqueduct above this site because of an earthquake, it would flood the landfill and send thousands of tons of pollutants into the underground aquifer, and down the San Luis Rey River, to Oceanside, causing a monumental environmental accident.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1988
Regarding your June 20 story, "Neighbors Fear Quality Will Turn Mountain Into Just a Molehill," Robert Pankey and Hal Jensen of Palomar Grading & Paving, sound like politicians trying to sell a pork-barrel project to their unsuspecting constituents. There's the touch of a snake-oil salesman. First of all, if you believe that Jensen will reduce the price of the rock because of the easy access to the freeway, then you'll buy anything from anybody. Rock is sold for a base price. And the easy access only profits one person, Jensen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1988
I read with interest Kesler's column, and I must admit that I felt a great sense of relief that the Pledge of Allegiance issue is not behind us, and that if I hurry, I can put forth my views before it dies forever. The focus is truly on the wrong group. The bill that caused all of this debate only refers to teachers and students. After years of leading the pledge, I doubt that many teachers even know what they are saying each morning. Repetitious recitations become numbing. As for the students, we all know the attention span of a child, and besides, we have never questioned their patriotism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1994
Re "Huffington Ad Calls for an End to Welfare," Aug. 5: So (Republican Senate candidate) Mike Huffington wants to cut off welfare tolet volunteers and donors take care of the poor? What a harebrained idea. It would take us back to the 16th Century and rob poor people of whatever dignity they have. At least under the present system welfare clients have responsibilities such as registering for employment and accepting training courses. The system is not designed to make clients feel as if they are receiving charity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1991 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The storms that have brought much-needed rain to San Diego County have also endangered the pipelines through which most of the county's water is delivered, eroding the San Luis Rey River bed and threatening to expose--and possibly rupture--the underground pipes, water officials said Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1992 | ROY RIVENBURG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
State water officials Monday summarily rejected a request by San Diego County for help in choosing an environmentally sound trash dump site in North County, saying they wouldn't touch the issue "with a 10-foot pole."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1988
I read with interest Kesler's column, and I must admit that I felt a great sense of relief that the Pledge of Allegiance issue is not behind us, and that if I hurry, I can put forth my views before it dies forever. The focus is truly on the wrong group. The bill that caused all of this debate only refers to teachers and students. After years of leading the pledge, I doubt that many teachers even know what they are saying each morning. Repetitious recitations become numbing. As for the students, we all know the attention span of a child, and besides, we have never questioned their patriotism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1988
Regarding your June 20 story, "Neighbors Fear Quality Will Turn Mountain Into Just a Molehill," Robert Pankey and Hal Jensen of Palomar Grading & Paving, sound like politicians trying to sell a pork-barrel project to their unsuspecting constituents. There's the touch of a snake-oil salesman. First of all, if you believe that Jensen will reduce the price of the rock because of the easy access to the freeway, then you'll buy anything from anybody. Rock is sold for a base price. And the easy access only profits one person, Jensen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1985
It's a sad day when a post office manager cannot accept general criticism of the post office by an employee without personalizing it, and compounding the problem by taking away the employee's right of freedom of speech by way of a written reprimand. What each individual thinks, feels, and expresses either verbally or by way of a letter to the editor, has nothing to do with the job performance. The manager should be embarrassed. JEANNE RAY Harbor City
NEWS
February 14, 2001 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Have we got a binary equation for you. It's a little love story about a dull, conventional, straight line who falls madly in love with a voluptuous, vivacious red dot. But the dot will have none of the line. She is enthralled with a devil-may-care, crude (yet entertaining) squiggle. The straight line's friends all tell him to find one of his own kind--a brainiac who is a straight shooter. The line can't do it. He only has eyes for the dot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1990 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William Worrell of the county's solid waste division sat quietly as he was berated by silver-haired Jeanne Ray on the evils of a proposed landfill site near Pala. Ray was one of more than 200 people who packed the Pauma Valley Community Center to protest the development of the site. They sat in folding chairs, lined the walls, stood in front of doorways and outside the building. The crowd at the meeting hall was just one indication to Ray that the county was not taking the matter seriously.
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