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Jeanne Simon

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NEWS
February 22, 2000
Jeanne Hurley Simon, 77, an Illinois politician and literacy advocate married to former U.S. Sen. Paul Simon. She had taught library science at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Ill., and since 1993 had chaired the U.S. National Commission on Libraries and Information Science. She championed literacy programs and promoted funding for libraries.
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NEWS
February 22, 2000
Jeanne Hurley Simon, 77, an Illinois politician and literacy advocate married to former U.S. Sen. Paul Simon. She had taught library science at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Ill., and since 1993 had chaired the U.S. National Commission on Libraries and Information Science. She championed literacy programs and promoted funding for libraries.
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NEWS
April 5, 1988 | From a Times Staff Writer
Jeanne Simon, wife of Democratic presidential candidate Paul Simon, apologized Monday to the Rev. Jesse Jackson for comments she made to a Madison, Wis., newspaper that appeared to compare his oratorical skills to those of Adolf Hitler. The Wisconsin State Journal quoted her as saying: "Look at what the man is saying. All he can do is talk. Adolf Hitler made some pretty good speeches too. If you like screaming and shouting and carrying on, that's fine." On Monday, Mrs. Simon said: "The Rev.
NEWS
April 5, 1988 | From a Times Staff Writer
Jeanne Simon, wife of Democratic presidential candidate Paul Simon, apologized Monday to the Rev. Jesse Jackson for comments she made to a Madison, Wis., newspaper that appeared to compare his oratorical skills to those of Adolf Hitler. The Wisconsin State Journal quoted her as saying: "Look at what the man is saying. All he can do is talk. Adolf Hitler made some pretty good speeches too. If you like screaming and shouting and carrying on, that's fine." On Monday, Mrs. Simon said: "The Rev.
NEWS
September 18, 1987 | DAVID LARSEN, Times Staff Writer
"History has been made," UCLA history professor Robert Dallek said. "As far as I know, there is no precedent in America for a Cabinet officer resigning to help the campaign of her spouse." He was referring to the resignation earlier this week of Transportation Secretary Elizabeth Hanford Dole, who said she wanted to devote her time to campaigning for her husband, presidential hopeful Sen. Bob Dole (R-Kan.).
NEWS
July 27, 1987 | BETTY CUNIBERTI, Times Staff Writer
Looking to advance their husbands' popularity in this key early-voting state, wives of six Democratic presidential aspirants fought back nerves and gave consecutive speeches in a first-ever First Ladies Forum at Drake University on Sunday.
NEWS
March 5, 1987 | BETTY CUNIBERTI and ELIZABETH MEHREN, Times Staff Writers
It was a spectacle, First Lady Nancy Reagan and White House Chief of Staff Donald Regan feuding, hanging up on each other's phone calls, the cross fire ceasing only when the former Marine and Wall Street executive left with what appeared to be a female footprint on his back. Some may have seen it as an embarrassing case of feminine meddling, endangering the Republic. But others saw it very differently. "My role model" is how Janis Berman, the wife of Rep.
NEWS
January 27, 1988 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
Outside, bright morning sun glinted off mid-December snow and the fresh chill turned political speeches into visible wreaths of steamy breath. Inside, in a high school gymnasium draped with red, white and blue bunting, more than a thousand students chattered and joked and bobbed their heads as a loudspeaker played one of singer Paul Simon's hits.
NEWS
July 26, 1987 | BETTY CUNIBERTI and ELIZABETH MEHREN, Times Staff Writers
If Democratic Sen. Joseph Biden of Delaware were to be elected President next year, his wife plans to continue working as a high school teacher. "It's my profession," Jill Biden said, "and I don't think Joe would expect me to give it up." Career homemaker Joanne Kemp puts "family first," but if Rep. Jack Kemp (R-N.Y.
NEWS
September 18, 1987 | DAVID LARSEN, Times Staff Writer
"History has been made," UCLA history professor Robert Dallek said. "As far as I know, there is no precedent in America for a Cabinet officer resigning to help the campaign of her spouse." He was referring to the resignation earlier this week of Transportation Secretary Elizabeth Hanford Dole, who said she wanted to devote her time to campaigning for her husband, presidential hopeful Sen. Bob Dole (R-Kan.).
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