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Jeanne White

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July 15, 1990 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Remembering her son's funeral, Jeanne White has to smile despite the pain: "Ryan would have just thought that everybody was just nuts to go to that much trouble to see him. He would have looked down and just laughed at everybody waiting in all that traffic." More than 1,000 mourners--among them First Lady Barbara Bush, rock stars Michael Jackson and Elton John, TV's Phil Donahue and Indiana Gov.
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NEWS
October 1, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
About 90 members of the militant AIDS group ACT-UP chained and padlocked themselves to the White House gates and called for President Bush to exert more leadership toward finding a cure for the disease. Most of the demonstrators were arrested. They were among about 750 AIDS activists who marched through downtown Washington, led by Jeanne White, mother of Ryan White, the Indiana boy who became a symbol of children with AIDS before he died in 1990.
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NEWS
October 1, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
About 90 members of the militant AIDS group ACT-UP chained and padlocked themselves to the White House gates and called for President Bush to exert more leadership toward finding a cure for the disease. Most of the demonstrators were arrested. They were among about 750 AIDS activists who marched through downtown Washington, led by Jeanne White, mother of Ryan White, the Indiana boy who became a symbol of children with AIDS before he died in 1990.
NEWS
September 30, 1987 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
Spurred by recent acts of discrimination and violence against children with AIDS and their families, a coalition of movie and television stars and professional and amateur athletes Tuesday announced the founding of the first national organization aimed specifically at combating prejudice against young patients of the incurable disease.
NEWS
April 11, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
Teen-age AIDS victim Ryan White returned to school Thursday after a judge threw out a temporary order barring his attendance, and some parents took their children out of class in protest. The ruling by Clinton Circuit Judge Jack R. O'Neill was the latest move in the legal fight that has kept the 14-year-old Kokomo youth out of classes for all but one day of this school year.
NEWS
August 1, 1985 | Associated Press
Officials barred a 13-year-old boy from school after learning that he had contracted AIDS during treatment for hemophilia, saying the school cannot cope with the necessary precautions and that other pupils could be at risk. "I'm pretty upset about it," Ryan White said Wednesday. "I'll miss my friends, mostly." "Ryan's been robbed of a lot of things," said his mother, Jeanne. "Ever since he's been diagnosed, we've had to fight for everything, and I guess it's going to keep going on."
NEWS
November 2, 1990 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soon after AIDS patient Ryan White won his poignant battle to remain in public school in Indiana, a group called Athletes and Entertainers for Kids signed on as his national fund-raising arm. Together they became a potent force on the Hollywood charity circuit. The entertainment community turned out in droves in 1988 for a glitzy benefit at the Century Plaza Hotel headlined by pop star Elton John, with tickets going for as much as $2,000 apiece.
SPORTS
September 12, 2013 | Bill Plaschke
His fabled accomplishments occurred on a board, above a pool, across an international sports stage upon which he became one of the greatest of Olympic athletes. Yet Greg Louganis is most frequently reminded of his past glory when he gets a haircut. "Everyone who touches my head wants to see the scar," he says. "They're always like, 'Oh, my God, is it still there, can I touch it?" Twenty-five years ago, the scar was a wound that bled its way into Olympic history. It emerged from an unforgettable moment of terror, followed by an equally memorable act of triumph.
NEWS
November 2, 1990 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soon after AIDS patient Ryan White won his poignant battle to remain in public school in Indiana, a group called Athletes and Entertainers for Kids signed on as his national fund-raising arm. Together they became a potent force on the Hollywood charity circuit. The entertainment community turned out in droves in 1988 for a glitzy benefit at the Century Plaza Hotel headlined by pop star Elton John, with tickets going for as much as $2,000 apiece.
NEWS
July 15, 1990 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Remembering her son's funeral, Jeanne White has to smile despite the pain: "Ryan would have just thought that everybody was just nuts to go to that much trouble to see him. He would have looked down and just laughed at everybody waiting in all that traffic." More than 1,000 mourners--among them First Lady Barbara Bush, rock stars Michael Jackson and Elton John, TV's Phil Donahue and Indiana Gov.
NEWS
September 30, 1987 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
Spurred by recent acts of discrimination and violence against children with AIDS and their families, a coalition of movie and television stars and professional and amateur athletes Tuesday announced the founding of the first national organization aimed specifically at combating prejudice against young patients of the incurable disease.
NEWS
April 11, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
Teen-age AIDS victim Ryan White returned to school Thursday after a judge threw out a temporary order barring his attendance, and some parents took their children out of class in protest. The ruling by Clinton Circuit Judge Jack R. O'Neill was the latest move in the legal fight that has kept the 14-year-old Kokomo youth out of classes for all but one day of this school year.
NEWS
August 1, 1985 | Associated Press
Officials barred a 13-year-old boy from school after learning that he had contracted AIDS during treatment for hemophilia, saying the school cannot cope with the necessary precautions and that other pupils could be at risk. "I'm pretty upset about it," Ryan White said Wednesday. "I'll miss my friends, mostly." "Ryan's been robbed of a lot of things," said his mother, Jeanne. "Ever since he's been diagnosed, we've had to fight for everything, and I guess it's going to keep going on."
NEWS
November 9, 1986 | Associated Press
AIDS victim Ryan White, 14, whose illness sparked a legal battle last year over whether he should attend school, has been admitted to Riley Hospital for Children in Indianapolis with a high fever, his mother, Jeanne White, said Saturday. Ryan, who has attended classes in Kokomo, Ind., all of this fall, was hospitalized on Monday. A hemophiliac, he contracted acquired immune deficiency syndrome in December, 1984, through a blood-clotting agent.
NEWS
July 9, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Vandals again desecrated the grave of Ryan White, the young AIDS victim who fought discrimination against those with the disease, Cicero, Ind., police said. White's 6-foot 8-inch gravestone at Cicero Cemetery was toppled Friday night or Saturday morning. In three earlier incidents, vandals used paint or uprooted flowers to desecrate the grave, police said. Ryan's mother, Jeanne White, offered a $500 reward for information leading to the vandals' arrests.
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