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Jeannie Cheatham

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER
The Cheathams with their "Sweet Baby Blues Band" work the same territory familiarized in four earlier albums, this time with the addition on three cuts of guitarist Clarence (Gatemouth) Brown. Basically, it's the leaders (piano/vocal and bass trombone, respectively) who dominate, introducing five new originals, along with a welcome change of pace when Jeannie Cheatham tries out a ballad, "Trav'lin' Light."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 2007 | Jocelyn Y. Stewart, Times Staff Writer
As a teacher, trombonist Jimmy Cheatham paid homage to the past by preparing young music students at UC San Diego to take jazz into the future. On stage, performing with the band he and his wife formed, he demonstrated why the music needed to live on. The band's style of playing incorporates blues and jazz. It was, the Cheathams said, "unrestrained, exuberant, soulful, rollicking, growling, howling, roaring, wicked, virtuous wild and truthful."
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 1986 | LEONARD FEATHER
The Alleycat Bistro, fast becoming the most adventurous new jazz room in town, took a calculated risk by bringing in over the weekend an eight-piece San Diego-based band led by pianist/blues singer Jeannie Cheatham and her trombonist husband, Jimmy. The gamble paid off. Because of heavy air play for the group's two albums, the room was packed Friday evening as the Cheathams went through their cheerfully old-timey motions.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1998 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jeannie and Jimmy Cheatham have warmed music lovers' souls for more than 40 years now. Consider the husband-and-wife team one of the few keepers of the Kansas City flame--a lighter, jumping, 1920s and 1930s style of jazz and blues noted for its bluesy vocals, percolating horn solos and rhythmic thrust. The pair--Jeannie plays the piano and sings, Jimmy is a bass trombonist and arranger--is known for giving lively, often uplifting concerts.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1990 | ZAN STEWART
Since the classic blues song form is a repeating 12-bar cycle with only slight harmonic variation, it takes a first-class ensemble to play a two-hour show of just about all blues tunes and make that performance kick you-know-what until the last beat drops.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1987 | LEONARD FEATHER
The Jeannie and Jimmy Cheatham Sweet Baby Blues Band, six men and two women strong, blew in Friday from its San Diego home base to play two nights at Catalina Bar and Grill. Pervasive though the blues still is in most jazz territories, this good-time group is like nothing else now active. With Jeannie Cheatham singing and playing straight-from-the-roots piano, and her husband pulling his weight as bass trombonist and arranger, you are transported back to the Savoy Ballroom.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 2007 | Jocelyn Y. Stewart, Times Staff Writer
As a teacher, trombonist Jimmy Cheatham paid homage to the past by preparing young music students at UC San Diego to take jazz into the future. On stage, performing with the band he and his wife formed, he demonstrated why the music needed to live on. The band's style of playing incorporates blues and jazz. It was, the Cheathams said, "unrestrained, exuberant, soulful, rollicking, growling, howling, roaring, wicked, virtuous wild and truthful."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1986 | THOMAS K. ARNOLD
The roster of jazz musicians who call San Diego home, at least on occasion, is diverse. Some, like keyboardist Art Resnick and saxophonist Joe Marillo, have established sizable followings through years of playing the nightclub circuit. Others, like bassist George (Red) Callender and reed player Buddy Collette, are nationally known stars who pass through here on tour and frequently return to vacation.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1998 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jeannie and Jimmy Cheatham have warmed music lovers' souls for more than 40 years now. Consider the husband-and-wife team one of the few keepers of the Kansas City flame--a lighter, jumping, 1920s and 1930s style of jazz and blues noted for its bluesy vocals, percolating horn solos and rhythmic thrust. The pair--Jeannie plays the piano and sings, Jimmy is a bass trombonist and arranger--is known for giving lively, often uplifting concerts.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1990 | DIRK SUTRO
In the beginning, there was jazz, and the sound was swinging, and the spirit was wild and infectious. And the Lord looked down and he said, "This is good." But musicians became gods, and music became art or big business. And the mood grew stiff and formal. Until San Diego husband and wife team, Jimmy and Jeannie Cheatham, came along. And, Wednesday at Elario's, their Sweet Baby Blues Band swung and shucked and jived through opening night.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER
The Cheathams with their "Sweet Baby Blues Band" work the same territory familiarized in four earlier albums, this time with the addition on three cuts of guitarist Clarence (Gatemouth) Brown. Basically, it's the leaders (piano/vocal and bass trombone, respectively) who dominate, introducing five new originals, along with a welcome change of pace when Jeannie Cheatham tries out a ballad, "Trav'lin' Light."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1990 | ZAN STEWART
Since the classic blues song form is a repeating 12-bar cycle with only slight harmonic variation, it takes a first-class ensemble to play a two-hour show of just about all blues tunes and make that performance kick you-know-what until the last beat drops.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1987 | LEONARD FEATHER
The Jeannie and Jimmy Cheatham Sweet Baby Blues Band, six men and two women strong, blew in Friday from its San Diego home base to play two nights at Catalina Bar and Grill. Pervasive though the blues still is in most jazz territories, this good-time group is like nothing else now active. With Jeannie Cheatham singing and playing straight-from-the-roots piano, and her husband pulling his weight as bass trombonist and arranger, you are transported back to the Savoy Ballroom.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 1986 | LEONARD FEATHER
The Alleycat Bistro, fast becoming the most adventurous new jazz room in town, took a calculated risk by bringing in over the weekend an eight-piece San Diego-based band led by pianist/blues singer Jeannie Cheatham and her trombonist husband, Jimmy. The gamble paid off. Because of heavy air play for the group's two albums, the room was packed Friday evening as the Cheathams went through their cheerfully old-timey motions.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1986 | THOMAS K. ARNOLD
The roster of jazz musicians who call San Diego home, at least on occasion, is diverse. Some, like keyboardist Art Resnick and saxophonist Joe Marillo, have established sizable followings through years of playing the nightclub circuit. Others, like bassist George (Red) Callender and reed player Buddy Collette, are nationally known stars who pass through here on tour and frequently return to vacation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2000
Saxophonist Joshua Redman, vibraphonist Stefon Harris and guitarist John Pizzarelli lead the lineup on the Orange County Performing Arts Center's 2000-01 Jazz Club series in 299-seat Founders Hall. Pizzarelli opens the series Sept. 22 and 23. Redman plays March 30 and 31, and Harris on April 20 and 21, 2001. Also coming next season are Latin jazz pianist Eddie Palmieri (Oct. 20 and 21), husband-wife jazz and blues duo Jimmy and Jeannie Cheatham (Nov. 17 and 18), singer-pianist Freddy Cole (Dec.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 1987 | THOMAS K. ARNOLD
- La Jolla attorney Don Glaser, who moonlights as a jazz singer-pianist in local nightclubs, was recently honored by the Lower Southern California Jazz Society as its Jazz Musician of the Year. His "Jeannie Award" is named after veteran San Diego jazz singer Jeannie Cheatham. Five years ago, Glaser recorded an album with be-bop greats Ray Brown and the late Shelly Manne, which continues to get regular air play on Los Angeles jazz radio stations KKGO-FM and KLON-FM.
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