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Jeannie Schulz

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2006 | Jocelyn Y. Stewart, Times Staff Writer
During 27 years of marriage to "Peanuts" creator Charles M. Schulz, Jeannie Schulz sat by her husband's side at business dinners and sometimes visited his studio as he worked. She was not his business partner, nor his creative "other half." In the world of "Peanuts," she had no title -- and that was fine with her. Over the years, though, the cartoonist whom she and others called Sparky hinted that her relationship with his work might change one day.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2006 | Jocelyn Y. Stewart, Times Staff Writer
During 27 years of marriage to "Peanuts" creator Charles M. Schulz, Jeannie Schulz sat by her husband's side at business dinners and sometimes visited his studio as he worked. She was not his business partner, nor his creative "other half." In the world of "Peanuts," she had no title -- and that was fine with her. Over the years, though, the cartoonist whom she and others called Sparky hinted that her relationship with his work might change one day.
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NEWS
February 22, 2000 | SAM BRUCHEY and JAMES RAINEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was a morning dreary enough to drive Snoopy right down off his doghouse, but the people of this Bay Area suburb turned out in force anyway--to say that the graceful and unerring hand of Charles M. Schulz extended beyond his beloved comic strip to the life he led every day. With small stories that spoke of big emotions--the sort Schulz made his stock in trade for nearly 50 years--the people of Santa Rosa told of the kind, white-haired man who many simply called "Sparky."
NEWS
February 22, 2000 | SAM BRUCHEY and JAMES RAINEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was a morning dreary enough to drive Snoopy right down off his doghouse, but the people of this Bay Area suburb turned out in force anyway--to say that the graceful and unerring hand of Charles M. Schulz extended beyond his beloved comic strip to the life he led every day. With small stories that spoke of big emotions--the sort Schulz made his stock in trade for nearly 50 years--the people of Santa Rosa told of the kind, white-haired man who many simply called "Sparky."
NEWS
May 30, 2000 | From Associated Press
Thousands of veterans, along with friends and relatives of fallen soldiers, watched the unveiling Monday of a portion of the National D-Day Memorial being built in Bedford, which lost two-thirds of its soldiers in the June 1944 invasion. "I think there are a few days in our history that should never be forgotten," Jeannie Schulz told about 4,000 people who endured chilly, intermittent rain to witness the Memorial Day dedication of a portion of the $12-million shrine.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2002 | CHARLES SOLOMON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Charles M. Schulz Museum and Research Center, which opens Saturday as the first museum in America devoted to the work of an individual cartoonist, is a handsome but unassuming building that fits quietly into its residential neighborhood here. That modesty seems appropriate. Although he created a worldwide popular culture and marketing phenomenon, Schulz remained a modest man who once said, "Cartooning is a fairly sort of a proposition.
NATIONAL
January 21, 2007 | Elizabeth Mehren, Times Staff Writer
The professor gazed at 18 students seated at long, glass-topped drawing tables, then projected a frame from the comic "Fritz the Cat" onto a pull-down screen. "I was a sophomore at the University of Wisconsin when I fell in love with R. Crumb," James Sturm said of the cartoonist with the signature big-footed characters, an icon of the counterculture. "I can honestly say that this comic that you are looking at caused me to drop out of school."
BUSINESS
December 6, 2005 | Meg James, Times Staff Writer
In a twist that might make its round-headed hero exclaim, "Good grief," Charles M. Schulz's "A Charlie Brown Christmas" -- the animated television special about love conquering materialism that airs tonight on ABC -- now fuels a $1.2-billion-a-year global publishing, merchandising and marketing machine. Millions of Americans will tune in, as they have every December for 40 years, to watch Charlie Brown and his gang learn that friendship and faith are more important than presents.
BUSINESS
November 29, 1987 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, Times Staff Writer
In 1965, a full 15 years after his "Peanuts" comic strip debuted and the very year Snoopy and the gang appeared on the cover of Time magazine, Charles Schulz's high school graduating class listed him in the "whereabouts unknown" column at its 25th reunion. Good grief! But while personal fame might have eluded the mild-mannered cartoonist for a while, fortune did not. Even as the 1940 graduating class from Central High School in St. Paul, Minn.
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