Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJeannine Correia
IN THE NEWS

Jeannine Correia

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
Eleven people have entered the race to fill the 76th Assembly District seat held by the late Bill Bradley. The candidates for the seat, which covers northeastern San Diego County and parts of southern Riverside County, include a Poway City Council member, a San Diego police lieutenant and a legislative aide to state Sen. William Craven (R-Oceanside). The list also includes a well-known atheist activist and a retiree who is involved in the controversy over the name of the new San Diego Convention Center.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 4, 1989 | BARRY M. HORSTMAN, Times Staff Writer
Tricia Hunter, a Republican who bucked party leaders by taking a pro-choice stand on abortion, Tuesday won a special state Assembly contest. Hunter, a 37-year-old cardiac nurse from Bonita, was followed by GOP write-in candidate Dick Lyles, who campaigned against abortion rights. Trailing far behind were Democrat Jeannine Correia, also a pro-choice candidate, and a second anti-abortion candidate, Republican Kirby Bowser.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 4, 1989 | BARRY M. HORSTMAN, Times Staff Writer
Tricia Hunter, a Republican who bucked party leaders by taking a pro-choice stand on abortion, Tuesday won a special state Assembly contest. Hunter, a 37-year-old cardiac nurse from Bonita, was followed by GOP write-in candidate Dick Lyles, who campaigned against abortion rights. Trailing far behind were Democrat Jeannine Correia, also a pro-choice candidate, and a second anti-abortion candidate, Republican Kirby Bowser.
NEWS
October 1, 1989 | BARRY M. HORSTMAN, Times Staff Writer
Under normal circumstances, her victory in August's special primary in the heavily Republican 76th Assembly District would have left GOP candidate Tricia Hunter with little to be concerned about as Tuesday's runoff approaches--except, perhaps, finding an apartment in Sacramento. The consensus in political circles is that Hunter--whose pro-choice stance on abortion drew national attention to the race after last summer's U.S.
NEWS
August 10, 1989 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB and BARRY M. HORSTMAN, Times Staff Writers
Abortion rights advocates claimed credit Wednesday for a pro-choice Republican's narrow victory in a special primary election to fill an Assembly seat in a conservative Southern California district. The election was the first state legislative contest in California since a U.S. Supreme Court ruling July 3 gave the states more power to regulate abortion.
NEWS
October 1, 1989 | BARRY M. HORSTMAN, Times Staff Writer
Under normal circumstances, her victory in August's special primary in the heavily Republican 76th Assembly District would have left GOP candidate Tricia Hunter with little to be concerned about as Tuesday's runoff approaches--except, perhaps, finding an apartment in Sacramento. The consensus in political circles is that Hunter--whose pro-choice stance on abortion drew national attention to the race after last summer's U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1989
The final tally from Tuesday's 76th Assembly District primary election shows that Republican Tricia Hunter beat fellow Republican Dick Lyles by 197 votes, the registrar of voters has announced. Hunter received 11,816 votes in San Diego County and 3,069 in Riverside County for a total of 14,885. Lyles received 11,378 San Diego votes and 3,310 in Riverside for a total of 14,688. Voter turnout for the special election was 22% in San Diego County and 15% in Riverside County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1989
Last month's Supreme Court decision giving states new authority to restrict abortions deepened the concerns of pro-choice advocates that legislatures would now bend to the will of those who would repeal all legal access to abortions. Such efforts to deny women the right to end unwanted or life-endangering pregnancies are certain to occur. There are encouraging indications, however, that political support for the pro-choice position may prove to be a lot stronger than some had thought.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1989 | BARRY M. HORSTMAN, Times Staff Writer
Ending a race that has drawn national attention as a referendum on abortion, voters in San Diego and Riverside counties will go to the polls today in a special election to select a new state Assembly member in the 76th District. After a four-month campaign marked by increasing acrimony in its final days, voters will choose among four candidates--two of them write-ins--to fill the vacancy created by the death last June of Assemblyman Bill Bradley (R-Escondido).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1989
Abortion was essentially the only issue in the primary campaign for the 76th Assembly District because it was the first state legislative race after the U. S. Supreme Court decision giving states more power to restrict abortions. But voters from both parties in the San Diego-Riverside County district took a significant step toward resolving that issue when they nominated candidates who favor protecting a woman's right to choose an abortion: Republican Tricia Hunter and Democrat Jeannine Correia.
NEWS
August 10, 1989 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB and BARRY M. HORSTMAN, Times Staff Writers
Abortion rights advocates claimed credit Wednesday for a pro-choice Republican's narrow victory in a special primary election to fill an Assembly seat in a conservative Southern California district. The election was the first state legislative contest in California since a U.S. Supreme Court ruling July 3 gave the states more power to regulate abortion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
Eleven people have entered the race to fill the 76th Assembly District seat held by the late Bill Bradley. The candidates for the seat, which covers northeastern San Diego County and parts of southern Riverside County, include a Poway City Council member, a San Diego police lieutenant and a legislative aide to state Sen. William Craven (R-Oceanside). The list also includes a well-known atheist activist and a retiree who is involved in the controversy over the name of the new San Diego Convention Center.
NEWS
August 9, 1989 | BARRY M. HORSTMAN, Times Staff Writer
In an Assembly race widely viewed as a referendum on the U.S. Supreme Court's recent abortion ruling, voters in a heavily Republican Southern California district apparently gave the edge Tuesday to a nurse who strongly supports abortion rights. The unofficial tally in the 76th Assembly District showed Tricia Hunter, a pro-choice Republican from Bonita, defeating five other Republicans with 30.9% of the vote.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|