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Jeannine Frank

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January 5, 1992 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON, Lawrence Christon is a Times staff writer.
"Parlor Performances" may not be the best name for what Jeannine Frank has been bringing to private homes and art galleries throughout Los Angeles for the past year or so, evoking as it does the image of polite, blue-haired ladies stoutly clutching their teacups under the wrenchingly dissonant onslaught of amateur musicales. But her program may be an idea whose time has come.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1992 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON, Lawrence Christon is a Times staff writer.
"Parlor Performances" may not be the best name for what Jeannine Frank has been bringing to private homes and art galleries throughout Los Angeles for the past year or so, evoking as it does the image of polite, blue-haired ladies stoutly clutching their teacups under the wrenchingly dissonant onslaught of amateur musicales. But her program may be an idea whose time has come.
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NEWS
October 4, 1990 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Think of it as Home Sweet Theater. Virtually every weekend, part-time impresario Jeannine Frank has an entertainer booked somewhere on the Westside. Recently, it was Dale Gonyea, a comedian and classical pianist. What set the evening apart was where it took place. Instead of playing clubs and theaters, Frank's entertainers put on what she calls Parlor Performances in private homes.
NEWS
October 4, 1990 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Think of it as Home Sweet Theater. Virtually every weekend, part-time impresario Jeannine Frank has an entertainer booked somewhere on the Westside. Recently, it was Dale Gonyea, a comedian and classical pianist. What set the evening apart was where it took place. Instead of playing clubs and theaters, Frank's entertainers put on what she calls Parlor Performances in private homes.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1997
Jan Breslauer refers to Josh Kornbluth's "one previous performance in Los Angeles, in 1991" ("It All Adds Up Now," Aug. 17). In fact, there were 16 performances, which I produced, and they were critically very successful. Over the years I've attended dozens of solo shows, and Kornbluth's monologues are exceptional. There are a handful of solo artists, including Los Angeles-based monologuists Vicki Juditz, Barry Neikrug and Sandra Tsing Loh who, like Kornbluth, are able to mold their idiosyncratic and often quite shattering experiences into life lessons--where the audience walks away transformed and having been thoroughly entertained in the process.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2004 | Lynne Heffley
The nomadic comedy and cabaret series Parlor Performances, which features a revolving roster of veteran satirists, singers, songwriters and musicians -- among them Dave Frishberg, Mort Sahl, Dale Gonyea and Paul Krassner -- has made its way through an eclectic array of venues since its inception in 1990. It spent 10 years in private living rooms from Silver Lake to Santa Monica and more recently has performed in such spaces as the Beverly Hills Public Library and the University of Judaism.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1992
In "No Big Production," by Lawrence Christon (Jan. 5), Jeannine Frank states, and you print without question, that she hates to go to "clubs like the Improv" because "I hate to be forced to drink. I don't smoke, and there's no depth or enrichment to the performers." In the 29 years we have been in business, not one of our clubs has ever forced any person to consume alcohol. To state the opposite is very detrimental to our reputation and to the image that we, at the Improvisation, have worked very hard to build.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Dave Frishberg's songs and Jeannine Frank's Parlor Performance series were clearly made for each other. Saturday evening in a Santa Monica living room, a few dozen people gathered, not to eat or drink or socialize, but simply to sit and listen in an intimate setting to an entertaining and unique pianist and vocalist. Frishberg had a mike at the beginning of his set, but promptly discarded it when he realized that direct communication would suffice.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1995 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Drummer Jeff Hamilton, who has been a steady member of ensembles led by Ray Brown since 1978, leaves the bassist's trio on Sunday, at the conclusion of the band's six-night stand at Catalina Bar & Grill in Hollywood. "I felt it was time to embark on musical ideas of my own," said Hamilton, before Tuesday's rousing first set with Brown and pianist Benny Green at Catalina's.
NEWS
October 16, 1992 | JANICE ARKATOV, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Janice Arkatov writes regularly about theater for The Times
Molly Picon lives--at least if Sandy Kanan has anything to say about it. "I always wanted to play her, but I didn't feel worthy," said the actress, whose UCLA doctoral dissertation became the springboard for her solo show about Picon, "I Sing!," playing Wednesday matinees at the Richard Basehart Playhouse in Woodland Hills. (Concurrently, Sunday matinee performances continue at The Complex in Hollywood through Dec. 13.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1998
George Cukor's 1964 "My Fair Lady" won eight Academy Awards including best picture, director (Cukor) and actor (Rex Harrison). All these years later, the charming musical holds up, despite Henry Higgins' attitudes about men and women. A recently restored 70-mm print will screen as part of the Academy Standards series. The rarely seen clip of Audrey Hepburn's "singing voice test" will also be screened. (Hepburn's singing was not strong enough and the songs were dubbed by Marni Nixon.
NEWS
April 4, 2002 | LESLIE GORNSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Is there such a thing as women's humor? Consider the six women who will be performing during "Tickling Adam's Rib," a three-day, four-performance comedy series, starring only women, that starts Saturday at the University of Judaism. None of them plans to do the typical--and what some of them call distinctly male--stand-up thing: setup, punch line, setup, punch line. Instead, one performer will play answering machine messages from her mom.
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