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Jed Petrick

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BUSINESS
January 7, 2004 | Meg James, Times Staff Writer
One of the founding executives of the 9-year-old WB network, Jed Petrick, announced Tuesday that he was stepping down as president and chief operating officer. Petrick's exit comes three months after WB Chairman Jamie Kellner unveiled his succession plan, installing two other longtime lieutenants in the top positions.
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BUSINESS
January 7, 2004 | Meg James, Times Staff Writer
One of the founding executives of the 9-year-old WB network, Jed Petrick, announced Tuesday that he was stepping down as president and chief operating officer. Petrick's exit comes three months after WB Chairman Jamie Kellner unveiled his succession plan, installing two other longtime lieutenants in the top positions.
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BUSINESS
September 30, 2003 | Meg James, Times Staff Writer
The WB said Monday that Garth Ancier, former entertainment president at NBC and Fox Broadcasting, will become chairman of the network, and programming chief Jordan Levin will become chief executive. A succession plan has been in the works since the WB's founder and chairman, Jamie Kellner, announced this year that he would retire by June 2004. In tapping Ancier and Levin, Kellner is essentially handing over the keys to two trusted lieutenants.
BUSINESS
January 18, 2001 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
WB Network has named its first president and chief operating officer, promoting Jed Petrick, a founding executive who has been the television broadcaster's only head of advertising sales. Petrick, who will continue to be based in New York, is expected to work closely with AOL Time Warner on ways to exploit the young audience the television network and the AOL Internet service have in common.
BUSINESS
April 10, 2003 | Meg James, Times Staff Writer
This summer, the WB network's trademark frog might find itself dancing in the shadow of a Pepsi-Cola bottle. The Burbank-based network and the beverage giant announced a partnership Wednesday that will create two new shows: A live music countdown with top-selling recording artists called "Pepsi Smash" and a contest with a two-hour finale -- "Pepsi Play for a Billion" -- in which a participant will have a shot at $1 billion.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2001 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that breaks down entrenched Time Warner fiefdoms, AOL Time Warner has merged its broadcast and cable networks and named the founder and chairman of the company's WB network,Jamie Kellner, as chief. AOL's surprising move is in keeping with its take-no-prisoners style as it eliminates barriers to growth and cross-promotion. "AOL is treading where Time Warner feared to tread," said Tom Wolzien, an analyst at Sanford C. Bernstein & Co.
BUSINESS
May 22, 2003 | Meg James, Times Staff Writer
Despite a wobbly economy, advertisers are on pace to spend a record $8.7 billion to $8.9 billion this week for prime-time commercials during the upcoming television season, TV executives said Wednesday.
BUSINESS
February 19, 2003 | Meg James, Times Staff Writer
After two turbulent years that saw CNN's prime-time shows slip behind those of rival Fox News Channel, Jamie Kellner is stepping down as chairman of AOL Time Warner Inc.'s cable networks. Kellner, 55, told top AOL executives late last year that he wanted to resign to return to his home in Santa Barbara and tend to the WB -- the network he founded -- before retiring next year.
REAL ESTATE
May 15, 2005 | Jeff Bertolucci, Special to The Times
Pacific PALISADES Realtor Anthony Marguleas has found that when the rich or the reticent deal in real estate, they sometimes want the details kept mum. Especially what they paid for a property. To that end, the Combined Los Angeles/Westside (CLAW) Multiple Listing Service, which covers a large swath of Los Angeles County including the upscale Brentwood, Beverly Hills and Pacific Palisades areas, charges a $250 "confidentiality fee" to keep a sale price off the MLS.
BUSINESS
November 29, 2001 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unable to compete in the crowded children's television market, NBC and Fox are preparing to call it quits by leasing their Saturday morning TV slots to the highest bidders. The two networks are in serious negotiations with outside programmers, including Nickelodeon, Warner Bros., Discovery Communications, DIC Entertainment, Sony, Pokemon producer 4 Kids Entertainment and Canadian children's television producer Nelvana. None of the parties involved would comment.
BUSINESS
October 13, 2002 | Meg James, Times Staff Writer
The 8-year-old WB network is, like, growing up. Ratings for the young network are rising by nearly 20%. Such hit shows as "Smallville," "Dawson's Creek," and "Gilmore Girls" have helped the WB for the first time beat its entrenched elders -- NBC, CBS, ABC and Fox -- among viewers aged 18 to 34 on some nights. Madison Avenue advertisers, who covet that free-spending demographic, seem to be developing a crush on the WB.
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