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Jed Steele

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July 8, 1992 | DAN BERGER, TIMES WINE WRITER
Two winemakers were talking. One said he was using Montrachet yeast to ferment his Chardonnay grapes. The other said he was using Prise de Mousse to ferment the juice into wine. The conversation then wandered off into arcane microbiological chat that was lost to the non-science majors present at the dinner table.
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BUSINESS
July 8, 1992 | DAN BERGER, TIMES WINE WRITER
Two winemakers were talking. One said he was using Montrachet yeast to ferment his Chardonnay grapes. The other said he was using Prise de Mousse to ferment the juice into wine. The conversation then wandered off into arcane microbiological chat that was lost to the non-science majors present at the dinner table.
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NEWS
August 18, 1994 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, Benjamin Epstein is a free-lance writer who regularly contributes to The Times Orange County Edition
Jed Steele, owner and winemaker at Lake County-based Steele Wines, will attend a five-course dinner featuring his wines at John Dominis restaurant on Wednesday. He'll also comment on the pairing of those wines with dishes created for the occasion by the restaurant's chef, Lasse Sorensen.
NEWS
October 10, 2002 | JESSICA STRAND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
BBQ Venture: Leonard Schwartz has left Maple Drive after 13 years as executive chef and founding partner. He's being replaced by Jeff Perlman, who most recently worked at the now-defunct Restaurant Muse. Perlman will keep such Schwartz classics as the meatloaf and the chili but plans to add his own touches.
MAGAZINE
January 8, 1989 | ROBERT LAWRENCE BALZER
THE ONCE volcanic, now tranquil region of Lake County is emerging once more as one of the state's finest wine-growing areas. That's largely because of San Francisco lawyer Jess Jackson, who almost innocently set in motion the wine making that today brings the region its status. "I was an almost-burned-out trial lawyer after 30 years," Jackson told me as we walked along rows of vines toward the functional concrete winery at his well-established Kendall-Jackson Vineyards.
FOOD
July 11, 1991 | DAN BERGER, TIMES WINE WRITER
At times like these--with recession, higher alcohol taxes, warning labels and increased concern over health, wine makers will resort to almost any tactic to sell their wine. Some go on the road to stage wine tastings and dinners; some have adopted fancy and exotic-shaped bottles or labels; others use bizarre proprietary names for their wines, such as Antares, Alchemy, Conundrum, Soliloquy and Spectrum.
FOOD
January 17, 1991 | DAN BERGER DAN BERGER
In making my choice of the best wine maker of 1990, I considered at least two dozen candidates. To make the job easier, I excluded the first two years' winners, John Thacher of Cuvaison and Bill Dyer of Sterling. Coincidentally, Thacher and Dyer work at Napa Valley wineries that are only about 500 yards apart. In fact, Napa Valley wine makers again dominated the candidate list this year, accounting for nine of the 17 runners-up.
FOOD
September 3, 1992 | DAN BERGER, TIMES WINE WRITER
Fine wine is not always solely the product of some little ol' winemaker; sometimes it's the work of the marketing department. A new line of wines that appears to be just that will hit store shelves within days. The Robert Mondavi Winery, which bought the Vichon winery some years ago, has made 40,000 cases of 1991 Chardonnay and 10,000 cases of 1989 Cabernet, which they call the Vichon Coastal Selections. They sell for no more than $10 each (with discounts, they'll be $8 in many locations).
NEWS
July 13, 1995 | LEONARD REED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fisherman's Wharf at Channel Islands Harbor has seen much change in recent years: the addition of new shops, the growing popularity of the Ventura County Maritime Museum, and slow but steady improvement in dining opportunities. Enter Pier 17, a seafood house that months ago took over the blue clapboard space once claimed by Charlie Brown's. The good news is that Pier 17 makes a strong entrance: The place is a well-conceived fish house with often satisfying results.
FOOD
April 15, 1993 | DAN BERGER, TIMES WINE WRITER
Competition in the medium-priced wine bracket means that the $8-to-$10 price niche is growing very crowded with bargains. There are two main reasons for this. Three major brands--Sundial of Fetzer Vineyards, M.G. Vallejo of Glen Ellen and Napa Ridge of Beringer Vineyards--have moved out of the so-called pop-premium field ($4 to $6 per 750-milliliter bottle), preferring to make better wine and charge more for it.
FOOD
February 7, 2001 | CHARLES E. OLKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Most wine lovers know that Carneros and Russian River in Northern California are two of the finest growing areas for Pinot Noir in the country. And I am the first to admit that the wines of Dehlinger, Gary Farrell, Acacia and Saintsbury are about as good as it gets. But Central California-from the Santa Ynez Valley up into the coastal vineyards of San Luis Obispo and Monterey counties-has its way with the grape as well.
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