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Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park

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TRAVEL
June 25, 1995 | JOHN McKINNEY
Northernmost of California's redwood state parks, Jedediah Smith beckons the hiker with both a primeval redwood forest and the banks of the Smith River, the state's only major river without a dam. The park honors mountain man and pathfinder Jedediah Smith, credited with discovering (for westbound travelers) the Rocky Mountains pass through which most California--and Oregon-bound--emigrants traveled.
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TRAVEL
September 12, 1999 | LAURIE K. SCHENDEN
LODI--Have a barrel of fun at the Grape Festival and Harvest Fair, Thursday through next Sunday, Sept. 16-19. Grape stomping, wine and microbrew tastings, and children's activities are planned each day. On Sunday, a parade will start down Pine Street at 12:30 p.m. Downtown and at the Fairgrounds. 4-11 p.m. Thursday, noon-midnight Friday-Saturday, noon-10 p.m. Sunday. $6; $3 for ages 5-12; seniors free on Friday, noon-6 p.m. (209) 369-2771.
TRAVEL
March 29, 1998
The following list was compiled through informal polling of "public inquiry offices" at the Bureau of Land Management, the U.S. Forest Service, the National Park Service and the California Department of Parks and Recreation. 1. Lava Beds National Monument (outside Tulelake, 250 miles northeast of Sacramento); telephone (530) 667-2282, Internet http://www.nps.gov/labe. "Sweeping views of the Great Basin and Range country." Cost: $10 per night peak season. No reservations. 2.
NEWS
September 1, 2002 | DON THOMPSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
JEDEDIAH SMITH REDWOODS STATE PARK, Calif. -- Researchers showed four years ago that California's coastal redwoods create their own "rain" by condensing heavy fog into drenching showers to nourish their roots during the region's dry summers. This summer, they're finding that the world's tallest trees' immense upper stories drink from the sky itself, sucking water directly from the clouds that shroud the coast much of the dry season.
NEWS
November 7, 1991 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
California's majestic redwood parks may be ceded to the federal government under a cost-cutting proposal being studied by state Parks and Recreation Department officials, the officials said Wednesday. The three parks--Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park and Del Norte Coast Redwoods State Park in Del Norte County and Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park in Humboldt County--are the centerpiece of the state park system and home to 2,000-year-old redwoods, among the oldest living things on Earth.
TRAVEL
October 10, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, Special to the Los Angeles Times
See those glossy outdoors photos on your desktop calendar? It's time to get into the picture. These hikes take you there, from red rocks to rain forests, from cliff dwellings to vernal pools. Complete all of them and you complete a picture of the West ? so don't forget your camera. Chiricahua National Monument, Ariz.: Volcanic rock pillars line up like rows of terra-cotta warriors in this under-visited parkland in the southeastern corner of the Grand Canyon state. Take a seven-mile hike along forested canyons to the Heart of Rocks Trail and come face to face with odd-shaped boulders named Punch and Judy, Kissing Rocks and the massively impressive Balanced Rock.
TRAVEL
July 14, 1985 | FRANK RILEY, Riley is travel columnist for Los Angeles magazine and a regular contributor to this section
The summer of 1985 would have to be rated special for visitors in the Redwood Empire of Northern California. It's the summer of the Skunk and the Eel, as well as for the opening of a new $1.5-million Visitor Information Center just in time to serve what is expected to be a record-setting season of travel among the tallest of all life forms on earth.
NEWS
March 7, 2000 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nestled near a towering redwood forest and the crystalline Smith River sits an imposing monolith of concrete and barbed wire that has become both savior and bane to this tiny North Coast town. When it opened about a decade ago, the maximum-security Pelican Bay State Prison seemed a clearing in the economic fog that loomed over remote Del Norte County as fishing and logging jobs in California's northwest corner began to vanish. And it was, quickly becoming the county's biggest employer.
TRAVEL
January 14, 1996 | MICHAEL PARRISH, Parrish is a free-lance writer based in Littlerock, Calif
Clyde Bransund, retired logger, studied his fishing pole, cantilevered over the rail of the Trinidad pier. "It's just a fishing village, but it's pretty nice," he said amiably. Then he offered another scrap of information since nothing was biting: "And the weather's usually about like this--just right." It was a late fall morning, 60 degrees, overcast, with no wind.
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