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Jeff Andretti

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May 11, 1990 | From Associated Press
Rookies Jeff Wood and Jeff Andretti walked away from crashes today during a busy day of practice for the May 27 Indianapolis 500. Both were driving 1989 Lola-Cosworth cars and the accidents occurred in a 20-minute span during the final full day of practice before the start of qualifications. Wood got high in Turn 1 on the 2 1/2-mile oval and smacked the outside wall four times before stopping on the apron in Turn 2. He damaged the right-side suspension and the tub of the car.
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SPORTS
May 17, 1994 | SHAV GLICK
With only three positions left to be filled in the 33-car 500 field, and 20 or more driver-car combinations on the Indianapolis Motor Speedway grounds, prospects are good for a wild final qualifying weekend. Bumping will start as soon as there are 33 qualifiers. This will make Honda drivers Mike Groff and Bobby Rahal most vulnerable. A number of drivers have already called off attempts with speeds higher than Groff's 218.808 or Rahal's 220.178.
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SPORTS
May 21, 1990 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There will be no fourth Andretti in Sunday's Indianapolis 500. Nor will three-time winner Johnny Rutherford get a chance to drive in his 25th race. Jeff, the youngest of the four Andrettis, was among the 33 qualifiers for a day before he was bumped late Sunday by Salt Walther, a relic who has not raced seriously since 1979. Walther had not run a lap this month better at than 204 m.p.h. until he stunned the huge Indianapolis Motor Speedway crowd by putting together four laps that averaged 210.
SPORTS
February 24, 1993 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Jeff Andretti set an unofficial world closed-course speed record for Indy cars when he raced the two-mile high-banked Texas World Speedway at 234.5 m.p.h. in College Station, Tex.
SPORTS
May 29, 1992
Jeff Andretti, who already had surgery twice to repair leg and ankle injuries sustained in the Indianapolis 500, had to have plastic surgery because skin grafts would not adequately cover some exposed areas.
SPORTS
February 24, 1993 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Jeff Andretti set an unofficial world closed-course speed record for Indy cars when he raced the two-mile high-banked Texas World Speedway at 234.5 m.p.h. in College Station, Tex.
SPORTS
April 26, 1990 | From Times wire services
Al Unser was the first Indianapolis 500 driver to compete against his son. Mario Andretti could become the first to race against two of his sons and a nephew. Jeff Andretti, Mario's youngest son, is among 10 drivers participating in the U.S. Auto Club's annual Rookie Orientation Program at the Speedway this weekend. If he qualifies for the May 27 race, he could join his father, his older brother, Michael, and his cousin, John Andretti, in the lineup.
SPORTS
May 27, 1992 | SANDRA McKEE, THE BALTIMORE SUN
Michael Andretti, his eyes ringed in dark circles, showed the signs of a sleepless night at Methodist Hospital. "The surgeries went very well," Andretti said. "Everything went back together the way it was supposed to." It is the latest installment in the 23-year history of the Andretti family curse at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. Since Mario won the Indy 500 in 1969, there has been no good news for the Andrettis at Indianapolis.
SPORTS
April 12, 1986 | DAVID KECK
Mike Groff of Northridge placed fourth in the first round of qualifying Friday for today's super vee race at the Long Beach Grand Prix. Groff, last year's co-rookie of the year on the Sports Car Club of America's super vee circuit, qualified with an average speed of 79.918 m.p.h. behind a front row of Scott Atchison of Bakersfield and Ted Prappas of Los Angeles. Atchison took the pole position (80.119), and Prappas got the other front-row spot (79.944).
SPORTS
May 26, 1992 | MIKE KUPPER, From Staff and Wire Reports
Jeff and Mario Andretti and rookie Jimmy Vasser, all injured in crashes during Sunday's Indianapolis 500, remained in Methodist Hospital in Indianapolis Monday, recovering from surgery. Jeff Andretti, whose car hit the wall nose first after losing a wheel at racing speed, underwent a lengthy operation to repair broken bones in both lower legs, ankles and feet. Jeff, at 28 the youngest of the racing Andrettis, was listed in fair condition.
SPORTS
May 30, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Mario Andretti was released from Methodist Hospital in Indianapolis, but his youngest son, Jeff, will be hospitalized at least two more weeks and then faces months of rehabilitation from serious foot and leg injuries sustained in last week's Indianapolis 500. The two Andrettis were among eight drivers taken to Methodist during last Sunday's race. The younger Andretti broke both legs and his heels, Dr. Terry R. Trammell said.
SPORTS
May 29, 1992
Jeff Andretti, who already had surgery twice to repair leg and ankle injuries sustained in the Indianapolis 500, had to have plastic surgery because skin grafts would not adequately cover some exposed areas.
SPORTS
May 27, 1992 | SANDRA McKEE, THE BALTIMORE SUN
Michael Andretti, his eyes ringed in dark circles, showed the signs of a sleepless night at Methodist Hospital. "The surgeries went very well," Andretti said. "Everything went back together the way it was supposed to." It is the latest installment in the 23-year history of the Andretti family curse at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. Since Mario won the Indy 500 in 1969, there has been no good news for the Andrettis at Indianapolis.
SPORTS
May 26, 1992 | MIKE KUPPER, From Staff and Wire Reports
Jeff and Mario Andretti and rookie Jimmy Vasser, all injured in crashes during Sunday's Indianapolis 500, remained in Methodist Hospital in Indianapolis Monday, recovering from surgery. Jeff Andretti, whose car hit the wall nose first after losing a wheel at racing speed, underwent a lengthy operation to repair broken bones in both lower legs, ankles and feet. Jeff, at 28 the youngest of the racing Andrettis, was listed in fair condition.
SPORTS
May 26, 1991 | MIKE KUPPER, TIMES ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
Word is that the traditional command, "Gentlemen, start your engines!" will not be given today at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. Instead, the Andrettis will leap out of their cars and announce to the rest of the field for the 500-mile race, "Come out with your hands up! We've got you surrounded." If you're looking for an Andretti today, you won't have to look far. In this 75th running of the Indianapolis 500, four of them will be driving together for the first--and possibly only--time.
SPORTS
May 26, 1991
No. Driver (Home), Car-Eng., Speed (m.p.h.) FIRST ROW 3. Rick Mears (Bakersfield), Penske-Chevy, 224.113 14. A.J. Foyt (Houston), Lola-Chevy, 222.443 6. Mario Andretti (Nazareth, Pa.), Lola-Chevy, 221.818 SECOND ROW 18. Bobby Rahal (Dublin, Ohio), Lola-Chevy, 221.401 10. Michael Andretti (Nazareth, Pa.), Lola-Chevy, 220.943 2. Al Unser Jr. (Albuquerque, N.M.), Lola-Chevy, 219.823 THIRD ROW 4. John Andretti (Indianapolis), Lola-Chevy, 219.059 26. Jim Crawford (Scotland), Lola-Buick, 218.947 20.
SPORTS
May 26, 1991
No. Driver (Home), Car-Eng., Speed (m.p.h.) FIRST ROW 3. Rick Mears (Bakersfield), Penske-Chevy, 224.113 14. A.J. Foyt (Houston), Lola-Chevy, 222.443 6. Mario Andretti (Nazareth, Pa.), Lola-Chevy, 221.818 SECOND ROW 18. Bobby Rahal (Dublin, Ohio), Lola-Chevy, 221.401 10. Michael Andretti (Nazareth, Pa.), Lola-Chevy, 220.943 2. Al Unser Jr. (Albuquerque, N.M.), Lola-Chevy, 219.823 THIRD ROW 4. John Andretti (Indianapolis), Lola-Chevy, 219.059 26. Jim Crawford (Scotland), Lola-Buick, 218.947 20.
SPORTS
May 17, 1994 | SHAV GLICK
With only three positions left to be filled in the 33-car 500 field, and 20 or more driver-car combinations on the Indianapolis Motor Speedway grounds, prospects are good for a wild final qualifying weekend. Bumping will start as soon as there are 33 qualifiers. This will make Honda drivers Mike Groff and Bobby Rahal most vulnerable. A number of drivers have already called off attempts with speeds higher than Groff's 218.808 or Rahal's 220.178.
SPORTS
April 15, 1991 | MIKE KUPPER, TIMES ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
If Al Unser Jr. ever starts getting overly comfortable with his success in the Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach, he can tweak himself back to reality in a hurry. All he has to do is think of the Andrettis. There was magic, once, in the Andretti name when it came to racing at Long Beach. If it wasn't papa Mario winning on the oceanside street course, it was older son Michael.
SPORTS
May 21, 1990 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There will be no fourth Andretti in Sunday's Indianapolis 500. Nor will three-time winner Johnny Rutherford get a chance to drive in his 25th race. Jeff, the youngest of the four Andrettis, was among the 33 qualifiers for a day before he was bumped late Sunday by Salt Walther, a relic who has not raced seriously since 1979. Walther had not run a lap this month better at than 204 m.p.h. until he stunned the huge Indianapolis Motor Speedway crowd by putting together four laps that averaged 210.
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