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Jeff Bezos

BUSINESS
September 30, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien
As if Silicon Valley's relationship to the whole National Security Agency spying-on-the-Internet thing wasn't awkward enough.  Now someone has placed a slogan on a billboard over Highway 101 near South San Francisco that reads: "Your data should belong to the NSA. " Review: iPhone 5s is a great phone, but is it right for you? [Video]   Guessing the identity of the organization or person behind the sign has become one of Silicon Valley's favorite parlor games in recent days.  Of course, it's possible that despite creepy, Big Brother-ish overtones, that it's the NSA itself just trying to get some good marketing.  Others have wondered, could it be the work of Michael Arrington, erstwhile blogger-turned-venture-capitalist-turned conscience of Silicon Valley?
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BUSINESS
December 3, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
Amazon.com founder Jeff Bezos staged a technology demonstration over the weekend, aiming to show how quickly a half-baked idea with several years of obstacles ahead of it could garner fawning attention from the news media. Answer: about two nanoseconds. The idea is for the delivery of Amazon orders by little unmanned copters, or drones. Bezos calls it "Amazon Prime Air. " The judges are still conferring, but Bezos is expected to have lowered the previous record, set by Elon Musk of Tesla Motors in August with his proposal for a "hyperloop" rapid transit system between Northern and Southern California.  Hyperloop enthralled techno-fans and not a few credible transportation experts before fading out of public consciousness, a few days after flaring into press.
BUSINESS
July 23, 2009 | Andrea Chang
"Earth's Biggest Selection" is getting bigger. Retail giant Amazon.com Inc. said Wednesday that it would acquire Zappos.com Inc., an online footwear and apparel company, in a deal valued at $807 million in stock. The acquisition would expand Amazon's empire by about 3 million products, including shoes, dresses, handbags and accessories. The Seattle company is one of the world's biggest online retailers -- hence the "Earth's Biggest Selection" slogan.
NEWS
December 2, 2013 | Paul Whitefield
There's a lot of buzz Monday about Amazon.com - specifically, its plan to deliver packages by drone. Amazon already has a name for the service : Prime Air. It also has a video showing how it works. Which is pretty good, considering what it doesn't have is the, you know, actual service itself . That's a few years off, company founder Jeff Bezos admitted in an interview Sunday on “60 Minutes” in which he unveiled the drone idea. But hey, it's the future. The Pony Express was pretty advanced for its day too. And I'm sure that someone then said, “But where are we going to get all those horses?
BUSINESS
March 10, 2000 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stung by widespread criticism of Amazon.com's patents on some of its Internet-based business methods, company Chairman Jeff Bezos on Thursday proposed a rewriting of U.S. patent laws to accommodate the lightning pace of innovation on the web. In an open letter posted on the online retailer's Web site, Bezos proposed cutting the term of patents on business methods and software to three to five years--much shorter than the existing term of 20 years from the date the patent is applied for.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2013 | By Ken Bensinger, Andrea Chang and Dawn C. Chmielewski
Amazon.com founder Jeffrey Bezos, who revolutionized the book business, is now aiming to do the same with one of the nation's most storied newspapers. The Seattle billionaire has agreed to purchase the Washington Post for $250 million, saying Monday that he was "very optimistic" about the paper's future. The Post, like the newspaper industry as a whole, has been beset by a rapid decline in print advertising, a loss of subscribers and challenges in building up online revenue. In a letter to Post employees, Bezos indicated that he wouldn't make radical changes in editorial operations and would continue to emphasize accountability journalism.
NEWS
November 16, 2000 | MATTHEW KAUFFMAN, HARTFORD COURANT
Barely five years ago, Jeff Bezos hooked up a few computers in the garage of his suburban Seattle home and flipped the switch on his dream to launch "Earth's biggest bookstore" by harnessing this newfangled e-commerce thing everyone was talking about. An initial public offering later, Bezos was a 34-year-old billionaire, joining the pantheon of brilliant nerd heroes who are rewriting the rules on everything in business. Now comes the hard part. Bezos could have called his venture Bookshop.
BUSINESS
April 5, 2013 | By E. Scott Reckard
The Securities and Exchange Commission may have booted Henry Blodget off Wall Street, but the former Merrill Lynch & Co. Internet analyst has attracted some big fans for Business Insider Inc., which he co-founded in 2007.  A major endorsement for the online news site landed this week in the form of $5 million -- venture capital rounded up by Amazon.com Inc. Chief Executive Officer Jeff Bezos.  “Jeff's leadership, vision and philosophy at...
BUSINESS
April 7, 2012 | By Amy Martinez
SEATTLE - Amazon.com founder and Chief Executive Jeff Bezos is putting a chunk of his fortune - estimated at $18 billion - toward more out-of-the-box ventures. He created a private aerospace company called Blue Origin in 2000 with an aim to make space travel more affordable, and he's spending millions to build a clock that's supposed to last 10,000 years in the desert wilderness of West Texas. Since 2010, NASA has committed nearly $26 million for Kent, Wash.-based Blue Origin, which is competing with Boeing and two other companies to create a new generation of vehicles that can take U.S. astronauts to the international space station.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
When not running Amazon, what does CEO Jeff Bezos do? Go looking for NASA's garbage. On Friday, Bezos confirmed that his team had retrieved the Apollo 11 No. 5 engine from the ocean floor on a mission in March. That was what they had hoped, but with the pieces stamped with serial numbers missing or corroded after decades under 14,000 feet of seawater, they weren't sure if idenfitication was possible. Now there is specific evidence that this hunk of metal is of the engine that first sent man to the moon.
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