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Jeff Buckley

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NEWS
June 3, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Singer-songwriter Jeff Buckley was presumed dead four days after he disappeared while swimming in water that joins the Mississippi River with Memphis, Tenn., authorities said. Buckley, the 30-year-old son of '60s folk cult hero Tim Buckley, has been missing since late Thursday night, when he entered the water fully clothed, according to a friend. An extensive search of the area has failed to locate him.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Shakespeare and contemporary popular music might seem like strange bedfellows, but his plays have a way of coalescing with whatever musical style is thrown their way. A rock version of "Two Gentlemen of Verona" won the Tony for best musical in 1972, proving that not even the zaniest combination is off the table. A curious experiment is underway at the Old Globe Theatre pairing Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet" with the moody songs of singer-songwriter Jeff Buckley, who died in a drowning accident in 1997 at age 30 but managed to leave a rich musical legacy that has spoken across generations.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1994 | STEVE APPLEFORD
Jeff Buckley sings like a man with more than a few exposed nerves. He sings mostly in an expressive falsetto given to wild shifts in volume and hysteria, delivering messages of isolation, romance and other urban ailments to uncomfortable extremes. That voice, and the jazz-flavored, charged rock he plays behind it, makes Buckley a self-indulgent new pop artist with the best of intentions: a willingness to take unexpected chances with his music and audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2013 | By Robert Abele
The twin tragedy of the late, acclaimed singer-songwriters Tim Buckley and son Jeff Buckley is that each died young - Tim in 1975 at age 28, Jeff in 1997 at 30 - without ever really knowing each other. Daniel Algrant's speculative drama "Greetings From Tim Buckley" addresses the one culturally arresting - and public - meeting of the souls across time: a 1991 tribute concert for Tim at which Jeff, wrestling with his absentee dad's legacy, is asked to perform. "Gossip Girl" star Penn Badgley tackles Jeff, and he bravely handles the son's musicality - whether jamming with guitarist Gary Lucas (Frank Wood)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2007 | Robert Hilburn, Special to The Times
Jeff Buckley released only one studio album during his lifetime -- 1994's "Grace" -- and it was an exquisite look at romantic innocence and obsession. But a new retrospective is an even more satisfying display of why he was one of the most promising artists of his generation. Most of all, the new "So Real: Songs From Jeff Buckley" CD reminds you of how astonishingly good a singer he was, someone with a strong, but subdued touch of the aggressive jazz and soul instincts of Van Morrison.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1995 | Robert Hilburn, Robert Hilburn is The Times' pop music critic.
You'd never know by talking to Jeff Buckley that he is one of the most acclaimed pop arrivals of the '90s, a singer-songwriter whose emotionally charged tales of romantic innocence and obsession remind you of a radical mix of Leonard Cohen and Edith Piaf. From his tone during an interview near closing time in an Italian restaurant here, you'd think Buckley's 1994 debut album, "Grace," had been savaged by critics. "Critics . . . ," he says pointedly. "They're like traffic cops.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2012 | By Mikael Wood, Los Angeles Times
The Holy or the Broken Leonard Cohen, Jeff Buckley & the Unlikely Ascent of "Hallelujah" Alan Light Atria: 272 pp., $25 There's a great scene in Penelope Spheeris' 1992 film "Wayne's World" - find it on YouTube under the title "May i help you riff" - in which an impatient guitar-store employee prevents Wayne from plucking out the opening arpeggios of "Stairway to Heaven" by Led Zeppelin. Pointing with great urgency, the guy directs Wayne's attention to a sign hung on the store's wall: "NO STAIRWAY TO HEAVEN," it reads.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Shakespeare and contemporary popular music might seem like strange bedfellows, but his plays have a way of coalescing with whatever musical style is thrown their way. A rock version of "Two Gentlemen of Verona" won the Tony for best musical in 1972, proving that not even the zaniest combination is off the table. A curious experiment is underway at the Old Globe Theatre pairing Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet" with the moody songs of singer-songwriter Jeff Buckley, who died in a drowning accident in 1997 at age 30 but managed to leave a rich musical legacy that has spoken across generations.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2008
Re "USC Acts by Popular Demand," by Randy Lewis, Oct. 22: Musicians Institute in Hollywood has been offering accredited bachelor's degrees in popular music performance since 1995. MI's bachelor of music in performance (contemporary styles) includes majors in guitar, bass, drums, keyboards and voice. The article raised questions about the potential for coexistence between popular music and higher education. We feel that these concerns were answered long ago by the countless MI students who have gone on to careers in every facet of contemporary music, including members of bands like Weezer, Nine Inch Nails and Red Hot Chili Peppers, artists like Keb' Mo' and Jeff Buckley, and musicians working with artists from Pink and Mariah Carey to Dwight Yoakam and John Doe. The marriage between pop music and higher education has proved to be happy and long-lasting, and we welcome USC to the field.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2000 | STEVE HOCHMAN
*** 1/2 Jeff Buckley, "Mystery White Boy," Columbia. Buckley's 1997 drowning marked the loss of a remarkable artist who had barely started his career. So any collection of concert performances--where his mix of Zeppelin-esque power and soaring elegance was most arresting--would hold historic and sentimental value.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2013 | By Mike Boehm
The Old Globe's new artistic director, Barry Edelstein, is a noted Shakespearean, and its 2013-14 season, the first he's picked, will give extra emphasis to the Bard, beyond the separate summer series that typically offers at least two Shakespeare plays in the outdoor theater that's part of the Old Globe complex in San Diego's Balboa Park. Edelstein will direct “The Winter's Tale” (Feb. 8-March 4, 2014), the first indoor Shakespeare play at the Old Globe since a 2001 staging of “A Midsummer Night's Dream.” And he's giving Shakespeare a new collaborator -- deceased Southern California-raised rocker Jeff Buckley -- in “The Last Goodbye,” (Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
A series in Sunday Calendar about what Times writers and contributors are listening to right now... Angel Olsen “Half Way Home” (Bathetic) A few Fridays ago at the little Bootleg Theater in Silver Lake, a singer and songwriter named Angel Olsen performed to a crowded room of curious, rapt admirers. Standing before a microphone and holding an electric guitar, the St. Louis (via Chicago) singer offered work from her debut solo album, “Half Way Home,” a small, good thing that's slowly (and after-the-fact)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2012 | By Mikael Wood, Los Angeles Times
The Holy or the Broken Leonard Cohen, Jeff Buckley & the Unlikely Ascent of "Hallelujah" Alan Light Atria: 272 pp., $25 There's a great scene in Penelope Spheeris' 1992 film "Wayne's World" - find it on YouTube under the title "May i help you riff" - in which an impatient guitar-store employee prevents Wayne from plucking out the opening arpeggios of "Stairway to Heaven" by Led Zeppelin. Pointing with great urgency, the guy directs Wayne's attention to a sign hung on the store's wall: "NO STAIRWAY TO HEAVEN," it reads.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2012 | By Mikael Wood
An experienced presence in her native New Zealand, Kimbra bent American ears -- and quite a few of them -- earlier this year as the female voice on Gotye's Hot 100-topping "Somebody That I Used to Know. " But that acoustic quirk-pop hit only hints at a bit of what Kimbra does on "Vows," her appealingly scattershot solo debut. It flits from jazzy electro-pop to muscular art rock to one tune that sounds like it was written for TLC's "CrazySexyCool. " Pop & Hiss caught up with the 22-year-old singer-songwriter at a Studio City cafe ahead of her shows Wednesday and Thursday at the Fonda Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2008
Re "USC Acts by Popular Demand," by Randy Lewis, Oct. 22: Musicians Institute in Hollywood has been offering accredited bachelor's degrees in popular music performance since 1995. MI's bachelor of music in performance (contemporary styles) includes majors in guitar, bass, drums, keyboards and voice. The article raised questions about the potential for coexistence between popular music and higher education. We feel that these concerns were answered long ago by the countless MI students who have gone on to careers in every facet of contemporary music, including members of bands like Weezer, Nine Inch Nails and Red Hot Chili Peppers, artists like Keb' Mo' and Jeff Buckley, and musicians working with artists from Pink and Mariah Carey to Dwight Yoakam and John Doe. The marriage between pop music and higher education has proved to be happy and long-lasting, and we welcome USC to the field.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2007 | Robert Hilburn, Special to The Times
Jeff Buckley released only one studio album during his lifetime -- 1994's "Grace" -- and it was an exquisite look at romantic innocence and obsession. But a new retrospective is an even more satisfying display of why he was one of the most promising artists of his generation. Most of all, the new "So Real: Songs From Jeff Buckley" CD reminds you of how astonishingly good a singer he was, someone with a strong, but subdued touch of the aggressive jazz and soul instincts of Van Morrison.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2013 | By Robert Abele
The twin tragedy of the late, acclaimed singer-songwriters Tim Buckley and son Jeff Buckley is that each died young - Tim in 1975 at age 28, Jeff in 1997 at 30 - without ever really knowing each other. Daniel Algrant's speculative drama "Greetings From Tim Buckley" addresses the one culturally arresting - and public - meeting of the souls across time: a 1991 tribute concert for Tim at which Jeff, wrestling with his absentee dad's legacy, is asked to perform. "Gossip Girl" star Penn Badgley tackles Jeff, and he bravely handles the son's musicality - whether jamming with guitarist Gary Lucas (Frank Wood)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
A series in Sunday Calendar about what Times writers and contributors are listening to right now... Angel Olsen “Half Way Home” (Bathetic) A few Fridays ago at the little Bootleg Theater in Silver Lake, a singer and songwriter named Angel Olsen performed to a crowded room of curious, rapt admirers. Standing before a microphone and holding an electric guitar, the St. Louis (via Chicago) singer offered work from her debut solo album, “Half Way Home,” a small, good thing that's slowly (and after-the-fact)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2004 | Steve Hochman, Special to The Times
Jeff Buckley never had a mainstream radio hit during his life. Can he have one seven years after his death? Sony Music is giving it a big push. The company is aggressively promoting the previously unreleased song "Forget Her," which is featured along with other bonus material on the new 10th anniversary "Legacy Edition" expanded version of "Grace." It's the only full album Buckley completed and released before he drowned at age 30 after wading into the Mississippi River near Memphis in 1997.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2000 | STEVE HOCHMAN
*** 1/2 Jeff Buckley, "Mystery White Boy," Columbia. Buckley's 1997 drowning marked the loss of a remarkable artist who had barely started his career. So any collection of concert performances--where his mix of Zeppelin-esque power and soaring elegance was most arresting--would hold historic and sentimental value.
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