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Jeff Greenstein

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1996 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Perhaps it's merely an example of refusing to see the glass as anything but half full, or maybe it's a little white lie to save face and justify the fact that they spend far more time together than they do with their wives. But Jeff Greenstein and Jeff Strauss insist that they are still happy, despite having gone almost overnight from writing one of the hottest shows on TV to one of the coldest.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1996 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Perhaps it's merely an example of refusing to see the glass as anything but half full, or maybe it's a little white lie to save face and justify the fact that they spend far more time together than they do with their wives. But Jeff Greenstein and Jeff Strauss insist that they are still happy, despite having gone almost overnight from writing one of the hottest shows on TV to one of the coldest.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1995 | LEE MARGULIES, TIMES TELEVISION EDITOR
The medical drama "ER," already leading in the nominations for this year's Emmy Awards, picked up three more Monday when the finalists in six additional categories were unveiled by the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. Nominations in these categories had been withheld when the rest of the 47th annual nighttime Emmy nominees were announced July 20 because each had multiple ties that had to be resolved through runoff balloting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2002 | ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The writing staff of TV's "Will & Grace" didn't make the cut. Fifty-one more California wordsmiths ended up on the scrapheap too, despite resumes gilded with prestigious awards, fellowships and publications. In the end, a Beat Generation standout, a bilingual chronicler of Chicano life and a multimedia Renaissance man emerged Wednesday as the finalists to become California's first formally chosen poet laureate. Now it falls to Gov.
BUSINESS
October 18, 1995 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Hollywood studios angling to cash in on the runaway success of television comedies such as "Seinfeld" and "Home Improvement," the stakes just got higher--again. In an effort to shore up its anemic comedy stable--and perhaps help the ratings of its sister network--Twentieth Century Fox Television is paying what sources estimate is in the neighborhood of $60 million this week to lock in long-term deals with a handful of comedy writer-producers.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 1993 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Martin and his girlfriend, Kate, are in bed watching something on late-night TV that, judging by their shocked expressions, is not Jay Leno's monologue. It's obviously appalling, terrifying, too scary even to define. Kate: "Oh, this is disgusting! Tell me when it's over." Martin: "Oh, my God!" Is it Hannibal Lecter dining on human entrails? No, something infinitely more startling. Cut to the TV screen, where a humping, pumping, grunting, grinding-in-unison nude couple are making hot, noisy love.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2011 | Mike Boehm
L.A.'s Blank Theatre Company is giving a teen playwright an opportunity to mine satiric laughter from Julie Taymor's travails directing the troubled Broadway musical "Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark. " The 19th annual Young Playwrights Festival at the Stella Adler Theatre in Hollywood includes "Spider-Man: Turn Off the Lights," a 17-year-old winner's poke at the onstage accidents and technical malfunctions that contributed to Taymor's ouster as director of the $70-million Broadway production.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1994 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While visiting Israel last year, Beverlywood resident Robert Bain decided to move to Tel Aviv with his wife and four young sons this summer. But in recent months, the ponytailed business investor has been flooded with a cascade of emotions about his decision: elation over the tentative peace accord with the Palestinians, and sorrow over acts of violence, including the massacre of 48 Palestinians in a Hebron mosque by an American Jewish settler.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1998 | DARRYL FEARS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From time to time, Jennifer Bracamontes recognizes a Latino on prime-time television. But she has to look hard. She looks past the glitzy main characters, the heroes and funny guys. She finds them lower on television's totem pole. "In some cases you, like, notice that the only person of color was sweeping leaves on the street," said Bracamontes, a 17-year-old Harvard University-bound senior who attends Garfield High School in Los Angeles. "It's noticeable on certain shows."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1995 | GREG BRAXTON and STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two new Fox comedy series will be flying the friendly skies--or, more exactly, the "Friends" sky--into catchy theme song territory. "The Crew" and "Partners" are among a number of coming prime-time imitations of the hit NBC sitcom "Friends." But the shows' producers have taken a further step in trying to attract "Friends"-sized audiences: They have commissioned bouncy rock theme songs that they hope will turn into radio hits, just like the theme from you-know-what.
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