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Jeff Hamilton

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1998 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Unlike many musicians who were getting their careers started in the '70s, drummer Jeff Hamilton never felt the pull of pop or electric jazz fusion. "Wasn't even tempted," he said. "I never bought into the pop music of my generation. I was listening to big-band music at an early age and always preferred that over what I was hearing on the radio."
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NEWS
June 14, 2002 | BOOTH MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was impossible to ignore the multihued jackets Shaq, Kobe and the rest of the Lakers donned immediately after their victory Wednesday night in the NBA Finals. The 2002 Championship "Three-Peat" leather jackets, emblazoned with the L.A. skyline and palm trees, were created by L.A. designer Jeff Hamilton, who has done hundreds of custom jackets for sports teams, as well as for celebs such as Madonna, Michael Jackson and former President Bill Clinton.
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SPORTS
January 9, 1990 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WIRTER
Dodger Manager Tom Lasorda couldn't resist topping Monday's newcomer luncheon with something even tastier than the Swiss almond ice cream--a third base controversy. Lasorda said that new Dodger outfielder Hubie Brooks would take ground balls at third base this spring, promising that, "When the season opens, I'm going to play our best eight guys, and right now I don't know who they are going to be." Somebody gently nudged Lasorda and asked, uh, what about current third baseman Jeff Hamilton?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's a week for jazz drumming by a pair of Jeffs in the Southland's major jazz venues. On Wednesday, Jeff Hamilton's trio opened a three-night run at Catalina, countering the six-night appearance of Jeff "Tain" Watts' quintet at the Jazz Bakery.
SPORTS
October 15, 1992
The Dodgers also announced that third baseman Jeff Hamilton and left-handed pitcher Steve Searcy have elected to test the free-agent market.
SPORTS
April 15, 1991 | BILL PLASCHKE
Jeff Hamilton took more than 30 minutes of batting practice in a cage underneath the stands after Sunday's game. He said he is trying to improve not just his swing, but his state of mind after being platooned at third base. "I am just trying to relieve some tension, get rid of some anxiety," Hamilton said. "It's hard when you are not playing. I'm just trying to get into a groove any way I can."
SPORTS
January 24, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Relief pitcher Jay Howell and infielders Jeff Hamilton and Mike Sharperson avoided arbitration hearings Thursday, agreeing to one-year contracts with the Dodgers. Howell signed for $2,575,000, Hamilton for $497,500. The figures on Sharperson's contract were not available. Howell had asked for $2.75 million against the Dodgers' offer of $2.4 million. Hamilton had asked for $545,000 and the Dodgers had offered $450,000. Sharperson wanted $675,000 and the Dodgers were offering $500,000.
SPORTS
January 31, 1991
Pitcher Tim Crews, outfielder Stan Javier and third baseman Jeff Hamilton on Wednesday agreed to terms with the Dodgers for 1991 contracts. All three players were eligible for arbitration. Terms were not announced. Crews, a right-handed reliever, was 4-5 with a 2.77 earned-run average in 1990. He appeared in a team-high 66 games. He earned $215,000 in 1990 and had been asking for $790,000 in arbitration in 1991. The Dodgers had offered $550,000. The switch-hitting Javier batted .
SPORTS
May 30, 1987
The Dodger fiasco continues unabated due to the inconsistent managerial style of Tom Lasorda and the obvious inadequacies of Fred Claire. The Dodger center-field problem can be easily remedied by a member of the current squad--Mariano Duncan, because he sure isn't a major league shortstop. Dave Anderson, who was groomed as the heir apparent to Bill Russell, should be given his chance. He couldn't be worse than Duncan. Third base can be turned over to one of the young prospects in the organization and forget the Bill Madlock experiment--his no-field and occasional hitting is ridiculous to endure.
SPORTS
February 24, 1992 | BILL PLASCHKE
Jeff Hamilton was so excited about flying here to Vero Beach, Fla., and beginning spring training last week, he left his batting and fielding gloves 1,000 miles away--on the top shelf of the closet at his home in Flint, Mich. When the Dodgers saw that he was in good shape and his left knee felt strong, that excitement was shared. "Jeff Hamilton is going to have to come in here and take that third-base job, nothing is going to be given him," said Fred Claire, Dodger vice president.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1999 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Even with a casual listening, there's no doubt the trio heard on Jeff Hamilton's new recording "Hamilton House" is led by the drummer, and it's not because the disc is full of long, indulgent and over-miked drum solos--it's not.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1998 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Unlike many musicians who were getting their careers started in the '70s, drummer Jeff Hamilton never felt the pull of pop or electric jazz fusion. "Wasn't even tempted," he said. "I never bought into the pop music of my generation. I was listening to big-band music at an early age and always preferred that over what I was hearing on the radio."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1994
Why do drummers want to become bandleaders? The appearance of Jeff Hamilton's Trio at the Jazz Bakery on Friday offered another reminder of a question for which no satisfactory answer has yet been found. Of the three main elements in jazz performance--melody, harmony and rhythm--the drummer must defer to another player to furnish the first two. True, many drummers have led their own groups with great success, but often with essential help from their sidemen. The case of Hamilton is puzzling.
SPORTS
October 15, 1992
The Dodgers also announced that third baseman Jeff Hamilton and left-handed pitcher Steve Searcy have elected to test the free-agent market.
SPORTS
March 18, 1992 | BILL PLASCHKE
Jeff Hamilton acknowledged Tuesday that his career as a Dodger is probably finished. "It's pretty obvious my time is done here," said Hamilton, who has eight at-bats and is sidelined because of a sore right hand. Hamilton once considered the Dodger third baseman of the future, has played only 48 games in the last two seasons because of injuries and has fallen to fourth on the depth chart.
SPORTS
January 24, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Relief pitcher Jay Howell and infielders Jeff Hamilton and Mike Sharperson avoided arbitration hearings Thursday, agreeing to one-year contracts with the Dodgers. Howell signed for $2,575,000, Hamilton for $497,500. The figures on Sharperson's contract were not available. Howell had asked for $2.75 million against the Dodgers' offer of $2.4 million. Hamilton had asked for $545,000 and the Dodgers had offered $450,000. Sharperson wanted $675,000 and the Dodgers were offering $500,000.
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