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Jeff Hartwig

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July 15, 2000 | MIKE PENNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No matter which way you looked at Friday's men's pole vault qualifying round, you couldn't see American record holder Jeff Hartwig failing to qualify for the finals. Hartwig couldn't see it, either, which, as it develops, was precisely his problem. Hartwig failed to even clear the qualifying height of 18 feet 2 inches Friday, and afterward placed some of the blame on his ongoing difficulties in finding the right fit of contact lenses.
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SPORTS
June 28, 2008 | Philip Hersh, Special to The Times
EUGENE, Ore. -- Sixteen years ago, when Jeff Hartwig did this for the first time, he was a wide-eyed young man happy merely to be in the U.S. Olympic track and field trials. Now, in his fifth appearance at this meet, the pole vaulter from St. Louis felt remarkably similar sensations as the 2008 trials began Friday night. "Four years ago, I could never have imagined I would be competing here," Hartwig said.
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SPORTS
May 25, 1999 | MAL FLORENCE
Cathy Harasta in the Dallas Morning News: "When pole vaulter Jeff Hartwig moved into his new home [at Jonesboro, Ark.] on May 11, he brought 84 of his closest friends with him. "That is his latest snake count as he guides a visitor through the 600-square foot reptile room that dominates the lower floor. . . . "Hartwig, 31, hears the word play over and over--how he slithers over the crossbar at meets and puts the squeeze on the competition."
SPORTS
July 10, 2004 | Mike Penner, Times Staff Writer
Jeff Hartwig can see clearly now, laser surgery having solved the contact lens problem that caused him to flinch at the 2000 U.S. Olympic track and field trials. And what are those numbers his new and improved eyes are detecting today, if not quite believing? 0 for 6. Six attempts to clear a height in the pole vault in two U.S. Olympic track and field trials at Sacramento State, zero successes.
SPORTS
May 16, 2004 | HELENE ELLIOTT
For most of his career Toby Stevenson was known as a pretty good pole vaulter, the guy who wears a geeky roller-hockey helmet when he arcs skyward. Since he started soaring toward new heights this season, he has become known simply as a pretty good pole vaulter. Stevenson, a six-time all-American at Stanford and the 1998 NCAA pole vault champion, became the ninth man to clear six meters (19 feet 8 1/4 inches) outdoors when he won the Modesto Relays on May 8.
SPORTS
June 28, 2008 | Philip Hersh, Special to The Times
EUGENE, Ore. -- Sixteen years ago, when Jeff Hartwig did this for the first time, he was a wide-eyed young man happy merely to be in the U.S. Olympic track and field trials. Now, in his fifth appearance at this meet, the pole vaulter from St. Louis felt remarkably similar sensations as the 2008 trials began Friday night. "Four years ago, I could never have imagined I would be competing here," Hartwig said.
SPORTS
July 10, 2004 | Mike Penner, Times Staff Writer
Jeff Hartwig can see clearly now, laser surgery having solved the contact lens problem that caused him to flinch at the 2000 U.S. Olympic track and field trials. And what are those numbers his new and improved eyes are detecting today, if not quite believing? 0 for 6. Six attempts to clear a height in the pole vault in two U.S. Olympic track and field trials at Sacramento State, zero successes.
SPORTS
June 28, 1999 | RANDY HARVEY
Although the rest of the track and field world might have felt as if it had taken a punch to the stomach when Michael Johnson withdrew two days before Sunday's 200-meter final in the U.S. track and field championships, Emanuel Hudson did not. The manager of the HSI (Handle Speed Intelligently) club said he saw it coming three weeks ago. "Remember Johnny Carson, the Amazing Kreskin character, when he held up that envelope to his head?" Hudson said.
SPORTS
July 22, 1998 | From Associated Press
Chinese gymnast Sang Lan was paralyzed Tuesday after damaging her spine in warm-ups for the women's vault in the Goodwill Games. "At this time, she is paralyzed and cannot move her legs and she has a minimal amount of motion in her arms," said Dr. Brock Schnebel, chief physician of the Goodwill Games. Officials said Sang, 17, injured her neck while attempting a forward vault in warm-ups and lost control in midair, striking the ground head first.
SPORTS
June 15, 2000 | Associated Press
Former Olympian Jeff Hartwig broke the American pole vault record for the fourth time when he cleared 19 feet, 9 1/2 inches on Wednesday at the Dia de Solto meet. Hartwig, a 1996 Olympian and hopeful for the 2000 Games, went 19-9 1/2 on his first attempt in the meet sponsored by Bell Athletics. He failed three times at 20 feet. Hartwig, 32, owns both the indoor and outdoor American record. His jump on Wednesday bettered the record of 19-9 he set last June 27 in Eugene, Ore. He broke the U.S.
SPORTS
May 16, 2004 | HELENE ELLIOTT
For most of his career Toby Stevenson was known as a pretty good pole vaulter, the guy who wears a geeky roller-hockey helmet when he arcs skyward. Since he started soaring toward new heights this season, he has become known simply as a pretty good pole vaulter. Stevenson, a six-time all-American at Stanford and the 1998 NCAA pole vault champion, became the ninth man to clear six meters (19 feet 8 1/4 inches) outdoors when he won the Modesto Relays on May 8.
SPORTS
July 15, 2000 | MIKE PENNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No matter which way you looked at Friday's men's pole vault qualifying round, you couldn't see American record holder Jeff Hartwig failing to qualify for the finals. Hartwig couldn't see it, either, which, as it develops, was precisely his problem. Hartwig failed to even clear the qualifying height of 18 feet 2 inches Friday, and afterward placed some of the blame on his ongoing difficulties in finding the right fit of contact lenses.
SPORTS
June 28, 1999 | RANDY HARVEY
Although the rest of the track and field world might have felt as if it had taken a punch to the stomach when Michael Johnson withdrew two days before Sunday's 200-meter final in the U.S. track and field championships, Emanuel Hudson did not. The manager of the HSI (Handle Speed Intelligently) club said he saw it coming three weeks ago. "Remember Johnny Carson, the Amazing Kreskin character, when he held up that envelope to his head?" Hudson said.
SPORTS
May 25, 1999 | MAL FLORENCE
Cathy Harasta in the Dallas Morning News: "When pole vaulter Jeff Hartwig moved into his new home [at Jonesboro, Ark.] on May 11, he brought 84 of his closest friends with him. "That is his latest snake count as he guides a visitor through the 600-square foot reptile room that dominates the lower floor. . . . "Hartwig, 31, hears the word play over and over--how he slithers over the crossbar at meets and puts the squeeze on the competition."
SPORTS
May 22, 2004 | Mike Penner, Times Staff Writer
Stepping out today alongside Marion Jones and Maurice Greene in front of an anticipated crowd of 10,000 at the Home Depot Center will be a masked shotputter and a helmeted pole vaulter. No, they are not hiding from federal investigators in the BALCO case. The extra gear is part of the show for Reese Hoffa, a.k.a. "The Still Unknown Shotputter," and Toby Stevenson, a.k.a. "Dark Helmet," both competing in the second annual Home Depot Track and Field Invitational, which begins today at noon.
SPORTS
February 10, 2001 | MAL FLORENCE
Bill Lyon of the Philadelphia Inquirer, writing on the "King of Statistics," Harvey Pollack, "who has crept to within a layup of age 80." "He is the Farmers Almanac, the encyclopedia, the atlas and the Rand McNally of numbers. You wouldn't recognize a box score now if it hadn't been for him. Not only has he developed systems and charts, he invented entire categories of statistics. "Most of those abbreviated hieroglyphics that allow you to re-create a game in your mind come from him. Rebounds?
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