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Jeff Healey

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1988 | CHRIS WILLMAN
Like many who've made brief attempts to master the guitar, Jeff Healey has tried a time or two to wrap his left hand around the neck of an electric guitar and strum with his right hand, only to become frustrated and give up. "I find it very, very uncomfortable," says Healey. "I can play a few chords, but I can't play any lead at all." The difference between Healey and most people is that Healey had already taught himself an entirely different--some claim revolutionary--way of playing the guitar.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jeff Healey, 41, a rock and jazz guitar whiz who rose to stardom with the platinum-selling 1988 album "See the Light" and its hit single "Angel Eyes," died Sunday of cancer at a Toronto hospital. Healey, who underwent numerous operations in recent years to remove tumors from his lungs and leg, had battled cancer since age 1, when a rare form of retinal cancer known as retinoblastoma claimed his eyesight. The Canadian-born Healey was a prodigy, learning to play guitar at the age of 3 and performing at 6. He developed a distinctive style of playing, holding the guitar in his lap like a flat-neck dobro, while fretting with his hand atop the instrument's neck.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1994 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In recent years, there's been a proliferation of tribute albums to such popular musicians as Jimi Hendrix, Neil Young and the Grateful Dead. Their songs are sung by contemporary artists, usually with great respect but often with mixed results. Guitar whiz Jeff Healey's upcoming album takes a different approach. "Cover to Cover," scheduled for a Nov.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1994 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In recent years, there's been a proliferation of tribute albums to such popular musicians as Jimi Hendrix, Neil Young and the Grateful Dead. Their songs are sung by contemporary artists, usually with great respect but often with mixed results. Guitar whiz Jeff Healey's upcoming album takes a different approach. "Cover to Cover," scheduled for a Nov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jeff Healey, 41, a rock and jazz guitar whiz who rose to stardom with the platinum-selling 1988 album "See the Light" and its hit single "Angel Eyes," died Sunday of cancer at a Toronto hospital. Healey, who underwent numerous operations in recent years to remove tumors from his lungs and leg, had battled cancer since age 1, when a rare form of retinal cancer known as retinoblastoma claimed his eyesight. The Canadian-born Healey was a prodigy, learning to play guitar at the age of 3 and performing at 6. He developed a distinctive style of playing, holding the guitar in his lap like a flat-neck dobro, while fretting with his hand atop the instrument's neck.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1993 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jeff Healey was cranky. Reached by phone recently at a hotel in Vancouver, the nimble-fingered guitarist-vocalist, who performs Monday and Tuesday at the Coach House in San Juan Capistrano, sounded brusque and sarcastic. The bone of contention was the Jeff Healey Band's latest album, 1992's "Feel This," a heavily produced departure from earlier efforts, particularly the group's blues-steeped 1988 debut, "See the Light."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1989 | JIM WASHBURN
Jeff Healey is one tremendous guitarist, and he pretty much had to be Thursday night at the Coach House to make up for the 2 1/2 hours that passed before he came on-stage. With that time filled by: The tail end of the Lakers' defeat on big-screen TV. A crunch-bent opening band. A protracted stage setup, with plenty of hammering and feedback squeals, as the room grew progressively warmer, Healey had a lot of ill feeling to conquer. The early evening evidently hadn't been a picnic for Healey either, as he had been up in Burbank to appear on the "Tonight Show," only to be bumped for lack of time, and then encountered that bit of permanent sculpture known as Southland freeway traffic.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1992 | MIKE BOEHM
A free concert Sunday by the Jeff Healey Band and Saigon Kick will cap a weeklong canned food drive that the Hard Rock Cafe in Newport Beach and radio station KQLZ (100.3 FM) are sponsoring for the needy. Healey, the Canadian blues-rock guitarist who scored a Top 10 hit in 1989 with "Angel Eyes," and Saigon Kick, a Miami-based hard rock band that has issued two albums on Atlantic Records, will play indoors at the Hard Rock from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1990
Can Prince actually write a song without the S word in the title? He's given his latest tune, "The Sex of It," to August Darnell for the upcoming Kid Creole & the Coconuts album, titled "Private Waters in the Great Divide." . . . Guns N' Roses mainstays Slash and Duff were in the studio with Iggy Pop recently, where the guys played on several tracks for Pop's upcoming album. . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1993 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jeff Healey was cranky. Reached by phone recently at a hotel in Vancouver, the nimble-fingered guitarist-vocalist, who performs Monday and Tuesday at the Coach House in San Juan Capistrano, sounded brusque and sarcastic. The bone of contention was the Jeff Healey Band's latest album, 1992's "Feel This," a heavily produced departure from earlier efforts, particularly the group's blues-steeped 1988 debut, "See the Light."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1992 | MIKE BOEHM
A free concert Sunday by the Jeff Healey Band and Saigon Kick will cap a weeklong canned food drive that the Hard Rock Cafe in Newport Beach and radio station KQLZ (100.3 FM) are sponsoring for the needy. Healey, the Canadian blues-rock guitarist who scored a Top 10 hit in 1989 with "Angel Eyes," and Saigon Kick, a Miami-based hard rock band that has issued two albums on Atlantic Records, will play indoors at the Hard Rock from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1989 | JIM WASHBURN
Jeff Healey is one tremendous guitarist, and he pretty much had to be Thursday night at the Coach House to make up for the 2 1/2 hours that passed before he came on-stage. With that time filled by: The tail end of the Lakers' defeat on big-screen TV. A crunch-bent opening band. A protracted stage setup, with plenty of hammering and feedback squeals, as the room grew progressively warmer, Healey had a lot of ill feeling to conquer. The early evening evidently hadn't been a picnic for Healey either, as he had been up in Burbank to appear on the "Tonight Show," only to be bumped for lack of time, and then encountered that bit of permanent sculpture known as Southland freeway traffic.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1988 | DENNIS HUNT
"You'll have to beep out the bad words," announced singer Tracey Bryn, of the hot British band Voice of the Beehive, which she fronts with her younger sister Melissa Belland, 22. Bryn, 26, was right. Many of her comments really were mine fields of expletives. Some of her songs are too. For instance, on the amusingly pithy "There's a Barbarian in the Back of My Car," from their acclaimed debut album on London/PolyGram, "Let it Bee," a four-letter word is beeped out.
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