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Jeff Hobbs

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April 23, 2007 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
IF F. Scott Fitzgerald had gone to Yale instead of Princeton, set his novel among precociously successful designers and financiers, with a struggling freelance journalist rather than a Midwestern bond dealer narrating, it might have turned out a bit like "The Tourists," a new novel by a 27-year-old Angeleno transplant named Jeff Hobbs. Those kinds of comparisons are too pat, of course, but nonetheless people are likening its author to the pride of St. Paul, Minn.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2007 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
IF F. Scott Fitzgerald had gone to Yale instead of Princeton, set his novel among precociously successful designers and financiers, with a struggling freelance journalist rather than a Midwestern bond dealer narrating, it might have turned out a bit like "The Tourists," a new novel by a 27-year-old Angeleno transplant named Jeff Hobbs. Those kinds of comparisons are too pat, of course, but nonetheless people are likening its author to the pride of St. Paul, Minn.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2008 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
In his 1985 breakout novel, "Less Than Zero," Bret Easton Ellis, then all of 21 years old, created young, jaded Angelenos who just didn't care about anything: They recounted cocaine scores and semi-anonymous sex in the same tone with which they lamented their fading suntans. That ennui became Ellis' literary signature, and as he began to grow up in public, he became known as a photogenic and glamorous figure who liked booze and excess. More than two decades later and almost four years after returning home to L.A., the city in which he grew up as the offspring of affluent Goldwater Republicans, Ellis himself claims to be in a phase in which he just doesn't care about anything -- a middle-aged wrinkle on the old Ellis ennui.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2007
INTERESTING, the attitude our self-hyping, blow-your-own-horn journalists take toward author Jeff Hobbs: "Aw, he's shy. Isn't that sweet?" [" 'Tourists' Friendly," by Scott Timberg, April 23]. Hobbs would at one time have been called "modest." Modesty: that means soft-pedaling your accomplishments; responding graciously when praised; resisting the urge to impose your "self-esteem" on others. Modesty is a virtue. Virtue: That means ... never mind. SYLVIA ALLOWAY Granada Hills
BOOKS
June 17, 2007
Los Angeles Times List for June 17, 2007 *--* Fiction Weeks on list 1. The Overlook by Michael Connelly (Little, Brown: $21.99) 3 Harry Bosch is on the case after a physicist is found dead on a Mulholland Drive overlook. 2. A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini (Riverhead: 3 $25.95) Two Afghan women struggle to survive jihad, civil war and Taliban tyranny. 3. The Yiddish Policemen's Union by Michael Chabon 6 (HarperCollins: $26.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 2002 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California is the "national epicenter" of coastal pollution, with one in three U.S. beach closures and warnings occurring between Rincon Beach in Ventura County and the Mexican border, a national environmental group reported Wednesday. The Natural Resources Defense Council's 12th annual "Testing the Waters" study shows that beach closures and warnings due to pollution were up across the nation and in California last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2003 | Kenneth R. Weiss, Times Staff Writer
Sewage spills and polluted runoff forced the closing of California's beaches more than 4,500 times last year, with three dozen beaches remaining off limits to swimmers for three months or more because of high bacteria counts, according to a report by the Natural Resources Defense Council, a nationwide environmental group. The number of closings in California actually fell 31% in 2002 from the previous year, a drop that the environmental group attributed largely to last year's drought.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 2003 | Patrick McGreevy and Kenneth R. Weiss, Times Staff Writers
Los Angeles county and city officials have agreed to spend $168 million to reduce by half the amount of trash that collects in the Los Angeles River, retreating from a costly court battle with state pollution regulators. And the city of Los Angeles decided to drop its lawsuit against state regulators over the overall plan to clean up polluted runoff that spills from sidewalks and streets into storm drains and then flows to beaches and coastal waters.
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