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Jeff Lindsay

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2010 | By J.A. Jance, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When a living writer turns his work over to Hollywood, a lot can go wrong with the story and with the characters — and that includes their gender, race and the story's setting. Eventually, what emerges onscreen is only distantly related to what the author originally wrote or what he or she intended. So when I heard that Jeff Lindsay's uniquely evil and paradoxically well-intentioned character, Dexter Morgan, was going to turn up as a series on Showtime, I was prepared to be underwhelmed.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2013 | By Mary McNamara
If Jennifer Carpenter doesn't get an Emmy nomination next year for the final season of "Dexter," which came to a close on Showtime just as the prime-time Emmys were airing on CBS, there really is no reason to have these awards. For years, "Dexter" has been treated as something of a one-man show, and certainly Michael C. Hall's portrayal of the world's first Serial Killer for Justice deserved the attention, and nominations, it received. Based on the Jeff Lindsay novel series, the show premiered in 2006 and no one knew quite what they were seeing.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2009 | Jonathan Shapiro, Shapiro is a former federal prosecutor who writes and produces for television.
It has been nearly impossible for anyone traveling L.A. streets or reading this newspaper to avoid seeing ads for this Sunday's season premiere of Showtime's "Dexter." Many of the ads show Michael C. Hall, the actor who plays Dexter Morgan, sporting his trademark demonic grin, while holding a cherubic baby. Both baby and serial killer are spattered with red liquid, the "joke" being that it isn't clear whether the liquid is juice or blood. For fans of such "humor," Jeff Lindsay's new novel "Dexter by Design" will surely be an enjoyable cup of congealed and gory tea. For others, this book is about pleasant as a sewer swim, and just about as socially rewarding.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2013 | By Gina McIntyre
For more than 10 years, first as a closeted funeral home director on Alan Ball's "Six Feet Under," then as the coolly charming psychopath at the center of Showtime's "Dexter," actor Michael C. Hall has demonstrated a skillful facility with characters who conceal their emotions - or lack thereof - from even those closest to them. Lately, Hall's talent for guarding dark secrets has become an invaluable asset. With "Dexter" set to conclude Sunday after an eight-season run, questions have begun to swirl over the fate of the blood-spatter analyst who's cut a murderous swath through Miami.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2013 | By Mary McNamara
If Jennifer Carpenter doesn't get an Emmy nomination next year for the final season of "Dexter," which came to a close on Showtime just as the prime-time Emmys were airing on CBS, there really is no reason to have these awards. For years, "Dexter" has been treated as something of a one-man show, and certainly Michael C. Hall's portrayal of the world's first Serial Killer for Justice deserved the attention, and nominations, it received. Based on the Jeff Lindsay novel series, the show premiered in 2006 and no one knew quite what they were seeing.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2013 | By Gina McIntyre
For more than 10 years, first as a closeted funeral home director on Alan Ball's "Six Feet Under," then as the coolly charming psychopath at the center of Showtime's "Dexter," actor Michael C. Hall has demonstrated a skillful facility with characters who conceal their emotions - or lack thereof - from even those closest to them. Lately, Hall's talent for guarding dark secrets has become an invaluable asset. With "Dexter" set to conclude Sunday after an eight-season run, questions have begun to swirl over the fate of the blood-spatter analyst who's cut a murderous swath through Miami.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2006 | Lynn Smith
IT was "just one of those neurotic moments," Jeff Lindsay says, describing his inspiration several years ago for the novel "Darkly Dreaming Dexter," recently turned into "Dexter," Showtime's abnormal psych crime series. He was the luncheon speaker at his local Kiwanis Club in Fort Meyers, Fla., and as he sat at the head table, a thought suddenly entered his head: "Serial murder isn't always such a bad thing." No offense to the Kiwanians, he is quick to add.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
When Showtime debuted "Dexter" way back in 2006, people couldn't quite grasp what they were seeing. A serial killer? As a sympathetic leading man? Were those the flames of Sodom burning distantly behind us? "Silence of the Lambs" had whet our appetite for charm-boy sociopaths - who did not rejoice when Anthony Hopkins' Hannibal Lecter escaped and began stalking his former jailer? (A man, it must be noted, who did nothing worse than irritate a convicted cannibalistic serial murderer with bad TV.)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2010
Dexter Is Delicious A Novel Jeff Lindsay Doubleday: 350 pp., $25.95
BOOKS
September 30, 2007
Susan Salter Reynolds reviews "The Florist's Daughter" by Patricia Hampl. Tim Rutten reviews "The Gathering," a novel by Anne Enright. The following reviews are scheduled: Edward Lazarus reviews "My Grandfather's Son: A Memoir" by Clarence Thomas. Reed Johnson reviews "Revolution of Hope: The Life, Faith, and Dreams of a Mexican President" by Vicente Fox and Rob Allyn. Nicholas A. Basbanes reviews "The Journal of Dora Damage," a novel by Belinda Starling. On the Web This week at latimes.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
When Showtime debuted "Dexter" way back in 2006, people couldn't quite grasp what they were seeing. A serial killer? As a sympathetic leading man? Were those the flames of Sodom burning distantly behind us? "Silence of the Lambs" had whet our appetite for charm-boy sociopaths - who did not rejoice when Anthony Hopkins' Hannibal Lecter escaped and began stalking his former jailer? (A man, it must be noted, who did nothing worse than irritate a convicted cannibalistic serial murderer with bad TV.)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2010 | By J.A. Jance, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When a living writer turns his work over to Hollywood, a lot can go wrong with the story and with the characters — and that includes their gender, race and the story's setting. Eventually, what emerges onscreen is only distantly related to what the author originally wrote or what he or she intended. So when I heard that Jeff Lindsay's uniquely evil and paradoxically well-intentioned character, Dexter Morgan, was going to turn up as a series on Showtime, I was prepared to be underwhelmed.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2009 | Jonathan Shapiro, Shapiro is a former federal prosecutor who writes and produces for television.
It has been nearly impossible for anyone traveling L.A. streets or reading this newspaper to avoid seeing ads for this Sunday's season premiere of Showtime's "Dexter." Many of the ads show Michael C. Hall, the actor who plays Dexter Morgan, sporting his trademark demonic grin, while holding a cherubic baby. Both baby and serial killer are spattered with red liquid, the "joke" being that it isn't clear whether the liquid is juice or blood. For fans of such "humor," Jeff Lindsay's new novel "Dexter by Design" will surely be an enjoyable cup of congealed and gory tea. For others, this book is about pleasant as a sewer swim, and just about as socially rewarding.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2006 | Lynn Smith
IT was "just one of those neurotic moments," Jeff Lindsay says, describing his inspiration several years ago for the novel "Darkly Dreaming Dexter," recently turned into "Dexter," Showtime's abnormal psych crime series. He was the luncheon speaker at his local Kiwanis Club in Fort Meyers, Fla., and as he sat at the head table, a thought suddenly entered his head: "Serial murder isn't always such a bad thing." No offense to the Kiwanians, he is quick to add.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2008 | Mary McNamara
It seems impossible to believe, but starting tonight CBS, scrambling for something new amid the writers strike fallout, is going to air Showtime's critical hit "Dexter" -- and network television may never be the same again. Following the exploits of Dexter Morgan (Michael C.
BUSINESS
December 28, 2012 | By John Schmid, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
JIN JILING, China - In silent, temperature-controlled labs in a desolate part of Hainan, China's most tropical province, rows of women in medical masks and lab coats clone trees that grow freakishly fast. The trees have official names, such as APP-22 or DH32-29, but Wending Huang, Asia Pulp & Paper Co.'s chief forester in China, calls them his "Yao Mings" after the towering Chinese basketball star. The tiny green tissue samples, methodically implanted in petri jars, will become hardwood eucalyptus trees that need only four to six years to reach full height, up to 90 feet or more.
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