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Jeff Lorber

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1993 | ZAN STEWART
* * 1/2 Jeff Lorber, "Worth Waiting For," Verve Forecast. Lorber presents a wealth of contemporary moods here, from the lush Brazilian feel of "Punte del Este" to the intense drive of the riff-based "High Wire." These tunes are bolstered by plenty of rhythmic excitement--John Robinson's drumming stands out--and Lorber shows he can play: His solo on "Underground" exhibits both chops and imagination. But even with Janis Siegal, Lee Ritenour, Bruce Hornsby, Dave Koz, Paul Jackson Jr.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Cornelius Bumpus, 58, a former member of the Doobie Brothers who played with Steely Dan and other bands, died of a heart attack Tuesday on a commercial flight from New York to California, where he was scheduled to perform in a series of concerts. A respected musician who began playing saxophone at age 10 in his school band in Santa Rosa, Calif., Bumpus had a 1966 stint performing with Bobby Freeman, who wrote and sang "Do You Want to Dance?"
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1998
Friday: * 6:30 p.m.: James Cotton * 8 p.m.: Eric Marienthal * 9 p.m.: B.B. King Saturday: * 2:30 p.m.: The Missiles of October * 4: Chris Gaffney & the Cold Hard Facts * 5: K-EARTH 101 FM "Oldies Feast" with Brian Hyland, the Olympics and the Monte Carlos * 8: The Untouchables * 8:30: GROOVE 103.1 FM Dance Party * 9: Joe Sample Sunday: * 2:30 p.m.
NEWS
February 21, 2002 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Starlight Jazz Serenade" returned to the Leonard H. Goldenson Theatre in North Hollywood on Tuesday night, the second annual event celebrating Hands for Hope's efforts to provide academic, cultural and social enrichment for children in the area. Once again, it drew a large crowd to hear a program packed with performances by some of the stellar acts in the smooth-jazz universe. As in last year's presentation, saxophonists were prominent.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jeff Lorber would probably be the last person to want to take responsibility for today's smooth jazz format. But the fact is that the first albums by his Jeff Lorber Fusion group, which included a saxophonist then known as Kenny Gorelick (and now known as Kenny G), virtually established the template for a generation of instrumental pop artists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Cornelius Bumpus, 58, a former member of the Doobie Brothers who played with Steely Dan and other bands, died of a heart attack Tuesday on a commercial flight from New York to California, where he was scheduled to perform in a series of concerts. A respected musician who began playing saxophone at age 10 in his school band in Santa Rosa, Calif., Bumpus had a 1966 stint performing with Bobby Freeman, who wrote and sang "Do You Want to Dance?"
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1992 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jeff Lorber doesn't get out to play much anymore. The keyboardist/composer/producer--who via his recordings and live performances introduced saxophonist Kenny G and singer Karyn White to the world--spends most of his time in the studio these days, producing tracks for such artists as White, singer Michael Franks and saxophonists Dave Koz and Art Porter.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1987 | ZAN STEWART
Will the real Jeff Lorber please stand up? The 34-year-old musician is a man of many hats. He leads his contemporary ensemble, for which he plays state-of-the-art computerized keyboards and composes pop/R&B vocal tunes. And he spends about half his time as a studio musician, working on projects for such people as DeBarge, the Isley Brothers, Jeffrey Osborne, Barbra Streisand and the Manhattan Transfer. The relaxed Lorber seems to take all this activity in stride.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1987 | LEONARD FEATHER
The house was sold out a full week in advance. That, of course, tells us nothing about the state of the jazz art; it merely signifies that organizers of the Playboy Jazz Festival know how to do their job, and after nine years at it they have fine-tuned it to the nth degree. Of the 10 main attractions presented Saturday at the Hollywood Bowl, five were artistically satisfying, two were of moderate interest, three were not.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1985 | LEONARD FEATHER
The final figures are not in at this writing, but the size of the crowds and the level of enthusiasm have spoken for themselves: the Kool Jazz Festival has once again shown the thriving state of the art and, for the most part, its economic viability. Such external nuisances as the hotel strike in Manhattan apparently had little or no impact.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jeff Lorber would probably be the last person to want to take responsibility for today's smooth jazz format. But the fact is that the first albums by his Jeff Lorber Fusion group, which included a saxophonist then known as Kenny Gorelick (and now known as Kenny G), virtually established the template for a generation of instrumental pop artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1998
Friday: * 6:30 p.m.: James Cotton * 8 p.m.: Eric Marienthal * 9 p.m.: B.B. King Saturday: * 2:30 p.m.: The Missiles of October * 4: Chris Gaffney & the Cold Hard Facts * 5: K-EARTH 101 FM "Oldies Feast" with Brian Hyland, the Olympics and the Monte Carlos * 8: The Untouchables * 8:30: GROOVE 103.1 FM Dance Party * 9: Joe Sample Sunday: * 2:30 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1993 | ZAN STEWART
* * 1/2 Jeff Lorber, "Worth Waiting For," Verve Forecast. Lorber presents a wealth of contemporary moods here, from the lush Brazilian feel of "Punte del Este" to the intense drive of the riff-based "High Wire." These tunes are bolstered by plenty of rhythmic excitement--John Robinson's drumming stands out--and Lorber shows he can play: His solo on "Underground" exhibits both chops and imagination. But even with Janis Siegal, Lee Ritenour, Bruce Hornsby, Dave Koz, Paul Jackson Jr.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1992 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jeff Lorber doesn't get out to play much anymore. The keyboardist/composer/producer--who via his recordings and live performances introduced saxophonist Kenny G and singer Karyn White to the world--spends most of his time in the studio these days, producing tracks for such artists as White, singer Michael Franks and saxophonists Dave Koz and Art Porter.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1987 | LEONARD FEATHER
The house was sold out a full week in advance. That, of course, tells us nothing about the state of the jazz art; it merely signifies that organizers of the Playboy Jazz Festival know how to do their job, and after nine years at it they have fine-tuned it to the nth degree. Of the 10 main attractions presented Saturday at the Hollywood Bowl, five were artistically satisfying, two were of moderate interest, three were not.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1987 | ZAN STEWART
Will the real Jeff Lorber please stand up? The 34-year-old musician is a man of many hats. He leads his contemporary ensemble, for which he plays state-of-the-art computerized keyboards and composes pop/R&B vocal tunes. And he spends about half his time as a studio musician, working on projects for such people as DeBarge, the Isley Brothers, Jeffrey Osborne, Barbra Streisand and the Manhattan Transfer. The relaxed Lorber seems to take all this activity in stride.
NEWS
February 21, 2002 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Starlight Jazz Serenade" returned to the Leonard H. Goldenson Theatre in North Hollywood on Tuesday night, the second annual event celebrating Hands for Hope's efforts to provide academic, cultural and social enrichment for children in the area. Once again, it drew a large crowd to hear a program packed with performances by some of the stellar acts in the smooth-jazz universe. As in last year's presentation, saxophonists were prominent.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1985 | LEONARD FEATHER
The final figures are not in at this writing, but the size of the crowds and the level of enthusiasm have spoken for themselves: the Kool Jazz Festival has once again shown the thriving state of the art and, for the most part, its economic viability. Such external nuisances as the hotel strike in Manhattan apparently had little or no impact.
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