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Jeff Macnelly

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2000 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jeff MacNelly, the Chicago Tribune editorial cartoonist and creator of the "Shoe" comic strip whose deft caricatures and gentle wit earned three Pulitzers over a 30-year career, died Thursday of lymphoma at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. MacNelly, whose disease was diagnosed last year, died after being admitted to the hospital Friday for emergency surgery. He was 52. He was one of the nation's most widely read cartoonists.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2000 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jeff MacNelly, the Chicago Tribune editorial cartoonist and creator of the "Shoe" comic strip whose deft caricatures and gentle wit earned three Pulitzers over a 30-year career, died Thursday of lymphoma at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. MacNelly, whose disease was diagnosed last year, died after being admitted to the hospital Friday for emergency surgery. He was 52. He was one of the nation's most widely read cartoonists.
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BOOKS
June 25, 1989
The 17th collection in this series fails to live up to its title for the same reason as the previous installments. The most innovative cartoonists in the United States tend to be liberals; Brooks prefers conservative ideology to artistic excellence. Of the 14 cartoonists who have won the Pulitzer Prize since the series began, only six are included. Pat Oliphant, Herb Block (Herblock), Tony Auth, Jeff MacNelly and Don Wright are conspicuously absent. In their place, Brooks presents derivative, second- and third-rate work that lacks the incisive edge needed to fix an image in the reader's mind.
NEWS
February 17, 1991 | PAUL DEAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I'm glad Walter Lippmann can't draw." --Lyndon B. Johnson Tony Auth, editorial cartoonist for the Philadelphia Inquirer, remembers being swept along by the fury and euphoria of the first offensive. "So Far, So Good," bragged the caption on his panel for the next morning. "Then, all of a sudden, Israel is attacked with what they were saying was probably nerve gas," he recalls. "So I yanked that cartoon.
NEWS
February 17, 1991 | PAUL DEAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I'm glad Walter Lippmann can't draw." --Lyndon B. Johnson Tony Auth, editorial cartoonist for the Philadelphia Inquirer, remembers being swept along by the fury and euphoria of the first offensive. "So Far, So Good," bragged the caption on his panel for the next morning. "Then, all of a sudden, Israel is attacked with what they were saying was probably nerve gas," he recalls. "So I yanked that cartoon.
NEWS
June 9, 2000
Jeff MacNelly, creator of the comic strip "Shoe" and a three-time Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist, died Thursday of cancer at age 52. In 1977, MacNelly started drawing "Shoe," about a newspaper's cranky editor and its two-bit hacks, all of whom just happen to be birds. The strip, now syndicated in nearly 1,000 newspapers, has appeared in The Times since 1989. Obituary, B6.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1994
The American Academy of Arts and Sciences has announced the election of 183 new fellows in recognition of their contributions to science, scholarship, public affairs and the arts. Those honored from Southern California universities include Robert Grubbs and Shrinivas Kulkarni of Caltech; Ronald Rogowski, Charles Young, Robert Dallek and Nikki Keddie of UCLA; Albert Bennett, Thomas Hines, A.
BOOKS
June 25, 1989
The 17th collection in this series fails to live up to its title for the same reason as the previous installments. The most innovative cartoonists in the United States tend to be liberals; Brooks prefers conservative ideology to artistic excellence. Of the 14 cartoonists who have won the Pulitzer Prize since the series began, only six are included. Pat Oliphant, Herb Block (Herblock), Tony Auth, Jeff MacNelly and Don Wright are conspicuously absent. In their place, Brooks presents derivative, second- and third-rate work that lacks the incisive edge needed to fix an image in the reader's mind.
NEWS
September 15, 1986 | ANN HEROLD
It wasn't a great escape, but it may be the longest. In fact, police in the Australian state of Victoria had given up on ever finding George Mulholland, 23 years old when he escaped from a Melbourne jail after his conviction for stealing a policeman's baton during a waterfront riot. But, 58 years later, Mulholland, now 80, strolled into the Melbourne City Watchhouse and gave himself up.
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