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Jeff Mccarthy

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NEWS
May 13, 2004 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
Jeff McCARTHY is biting the hand that once fed him. Or maybe billy-clubbing it. As Inspector Javert in "Les Miserables" during its original 1988-89 run at the Shubert Theatre, McCarthy embodied dour determination. Now he's playing a very different cop -- the cynical but amusing Officer Lockstock in the tongue-in-cheek musical "Urinetown," which just began its 12-day run at the Wilshire Theatre in Beverly Hills. "Les Miz" is one of the more specific targets of the satire in "Urinetown."
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NEWS
May 13, 2004 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
Jeff McCARTHY is biting the hand that once fed him. Or maybe billy-clubbing it. As Inspector Javert in "Les Miserables" during its original 1988-89 run at the Shubert Theatre, McCarthy embodied dour determination. Now he's playing a very different cop -- the cynical but amusing Officer Lockstock in the tongue-in-cheek musical "Urinetown," which just began its 12-day run at the Wilshire Theatre in Beverly Hills. "Les Miz" is one of the more specific targets of the satire in "Urinetown."
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1989 | BARBARA ISENBERG
What's it like to end 14 months worth of performances in a hit musical? When they strike the set and pack up the costumes, what becomes of the 37 actors who are suddenly out of work? Calendar talked with several members of the "Les Miserables" cast about what comes next: Alice Vienneau When Alice Vienneau was a teen-ager, her high school field hockey team, the Willingboro (N. J.) Chimeras, were the state champions.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1989 | BARBARA ISENBERG
What's it like to end 14 months worth of performances in a hit musical? When they strike the set and pack up the costumes, what becomes of the 37 actors who are suddenly out of work? Calendar talked with several members of the "Les Miserables" cast about what comes next: Alice Vienneau When Alice Vienneau was a teen-ager, her high school field hockey team, the Willingboro (N. J.) Chimeras, were the state champions.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Angels Update: Jeff McCarthy, who starred as Javert during "Les Miserables' " long run at the Shubert Theater, will be back on the Shubert stage Sept. 11 to take over the lead role of Detective Stone in "City of Angels." James Naughton, who created the role on Broadway, bows out of the show Sunday. In the interim, the role will be played by Jeffrey Rockwell. "Angels" closes at the Shubert Oct. 27 to start a national tour.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Stephanie J. Block, who played Liza Minnelli on Broadway in "The Boy From Oz" and starred in L.A. as Elphaba, the green witch, in a touring production of "Wicked," has landed one of next season's plum roles on Broadway: the title character in "The Pirate Queen," a lavish new musical by the team that created "Les Miserables" and "Miss Saigon." Block will play Grace O'Malley, the legendary Irish lass who was the scourge of Elizabethan England and beyond. Linda Balgord will portray Elizabeth I.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1994 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The seminal cabaret-as-theatre work--"Jacques Brel Is Alive & Well & Living in Paris"--which opened Saturday at the Cinegrill, seems perfectly suited, in size and manner, for the venue's small circular stage, and the company of Susan Hull, Jeff McCarthy, Teri Ralston and Jeffrey Rockwell does a generally convincing job with Brel's not always convincing lyrics.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1988 | JANICE ARKATOV
Jeff McCarthy hates being called a bad guy. "I really resent it when people do that," says the actor who plays Javert, the unforgiving policeman who hounds hero Jean Valjean in "Les Miserables" (at the Shubert). "The Thenardiers--the innkeeper and his wife--are the bad guys, not me. They're really evil. But there I am with those humongous sideburns, dressed in black. . . . Yes, Javert is rigid and judgmental. He thinks there are laws you cannot break--and if you do, you're condemned."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1988 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
It's almost frightening to see how efficiently "Les Miserables" has been replicated for the West Coast at the Shubert Theatre. After nine other productions, the Cameron Mackintosh Organization has indeed got it down to a science. There had been a problem with the show's turntable, but everything went right Wednesday night. The barricade glided together like a giant Tinkertoy. The sound system zapped the slightest lyric to the back of the house, with only little less presence than a recording.
SPORTS
December 6, 1992 | LONNIE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It will be a Del Rey League rematch in next week's Southern Section Division I championship game, thanks to Los Angeles Loyola's 17-7 victory over Fontana before an estimated 6,000 at Birmingham High in Van Nuys on Saturday night. Loyola (12-1), the 1990 Division I champion, will get a chance to avenge its only loss of the season by meeting league rival La Puente Bishop Amat at Anaheim Stadium on Friday night. Bishop Amat beat the Cubs, 28-14, during the regular season.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1991 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The wonder of "City of Angels" is in how its creators took such a seemingly tired idea and worked it into such clever entertainment. Broadway veterans Larry Gelbart (who wrote the book), Cy Coleman (the score) and David Zippel (the lyrics) act as though they're the first to consider spoofing '40s detective movies and the often ridiculous Hollywood system that spawned them.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1998 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If anyone could rightly be expected to still yank a rabbit from his hat in his 80s, it'd be veteran animator Chuck Jones. Indeed, the man who directed countless Bugs Bunny cartoons and other classics for Warner Bros., creator of the Road Runner, Wile E. Coyote and Pepe Le Pew, has worked nothing short of a miniature miracle with the sequel to what may be his single most famous cartoon: "One Froggy Evening."
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