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Jeff Pollack

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1992 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alternative rock music, traditionally shunned on radio, will soon be embraced by stations as a viable, full-time format, Santa Monica-based radio consultant Jeff Pollack predicted Thursday. "This is the first significant underground movement since the trend that brought the album music of the late '60s to radio," he said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1992 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alternative rock music, traditionally shunned on radio, will soon be embraced by stations as a viable, full-time format, Santa Monica-based radio consultant Jeff Pollack predicted Thursday. "This is the first significant underground movement since the trend that brought the album music of the late '60s to radio," he said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1994 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kyle (Duane Martin) is a high school basketball phenom in Harlem who wants to be a college whiz and an NBA all-star. Irked that the big college recruiters have yet to sign him, he showboats on the court in the closing games of his final season. It's bad teamwork but great to watch: Kyle is totally fulfilled as he soars through the air.
BUSINESS
February 26, 1996 | Times Staff Reports
I Hear Music: Those looking to discover the next buzz in the music business might consider attending the 1996 New Media and Music Conference, which kicks off Thursday at the Westwood Marquis Hotel. This year, the annual three-day convention will include panels featuring advice from such talent aces as U2 manager Paul McGuinness and Epitaph Records chief Bret Gurewitz, who launched the careers of Rancid and Offspring, the hottest neopunk acts in the business.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1991
Concerning the recent articles on the disclosure that KROQ deejays knowingly broadcast a false murder confession: Being involved in radio for almost 20 years, I've followed the KROQ incident with great interest--not because it's an anomaly, but because it's the inevitable culmination of years of ruinous programming policy. What deejays Gene Baxter and Kevin Ryder have done is irresponsible and indefensible, period. They have no place in radio. Now what should be the subject of consideration is the atmosphere that encouraged this unconscionable action--an indulgent "anything for ratings" mentality.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1995
As a loyal KSCA listener, I was a little put off by some of the comments made by radio industry consultant Jeff Pollack ("KSCA Take Small Bites for Starters," Oct. 14). Pollack's claim that KSCA is "having a problem being too eclectic or not interesting enough," to me, is invalid. Looking for a music outlet on the air that dares to play something "eclectic" is precisely why all 24,000 of us continue to tune in every day. The on-air staff are very knowledgeable about the music they play and do not spend time trying to push their "personalities" on us. They concentrate on the music.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1997
Assuming that the Dust Brothers and Babyface songs go well and get on the new Stones album, will Mick Jagger's radio gambit pay off? Or will having too many producers spoil the, er, Goat's Head Soup? "Voodoo Lounge" sold a so-so 1.8 million copies in the U.S., and "Stripped," despite reworked versions of some Stones classics, did just 700,000--and neither had a high radio profile.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1992
The prize for the most Orwellian use of a quote this year should go to Jeff Pollack, who employs Thomas Jefferson's words about self-determination in an article that advocates defiance of the popular will and rule by judicial fiat ("Radio Stations Should Challenge FCC in Court," Nov. 9). Pollack doesn't really care how the court would rule. His strategy is to mire the commission in litigation that "will prove expensive and time-consuming," forcing the commission to cut back on the execution of its duties.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1992 | Andy Marx
"The Michael Concepcion Story," which details the creation, growth and rise to power of South-Central L.A.'s Crips gang through the personal story of one its founders, is currently being developed at Warner Bros. by Benny Medina, an executive at Warner Bros. Records' Black Music Division, and partner Jeff Pollack. Medina says Renny Harlin ("Die Hard 2") will direct the film, and Concepcion, who among several others formed the gang in the late '70s, will act as a consultant.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1990
A jury ordered a radio station and two disc jockeys to pay $694,200 in damages to a news director they referred to with risque jokes on a "shock radio" program. Liz Randolph, 32, claimed the jokes, which implied she was promiscuous and mentally unstable, caused her to suffer panic attacks and led her to seek psychiatric treatment.
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