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Jeff Rouse

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SPORTS
March 28, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Stanford's Jeff Rouse lowered his American record in the 100-yard backstroke in the NCAA men's swimming and diving championships at Indianapolis. Rouse won the 100 backstroke in 46.12 seconds, bettering his day-old American record of 46.22. Stanford virtually wrapped up the team title with 445 points to 256 for Texas. UCLA was third at 201 points.
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SPORTS
July 14, 2003 | Dan Arritt, Times Staff Writer
Jeff Rouse wouldn't put himself through a comeback if he didn't believe he had a chance. Rouse, a two-time Olympic gold medalist in the 100-meter backstroke and the event's top-ranked swimmer in the world from 1989 to 1996, continued to show he's serious about making the United States 2004 Olympic team. Rouse, 33, looked strong while finishing second in the 100 backstroke Sunday in the Janet Evans Invitational at USC. Rouse finished in 56.
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SPORTS
March 29, 1992 | Associated Press
Stanford's Jeff Rouse set his fifth American record of the meet, winning the 200-yard backstroke in 1:40.64, and the Cardinal scored the most points ever while winning the team title at the NCAA men's swimming and diving championships Saturday. Stanford had 632 points to 356 for Texas. UCLA was third with 310 points. The previous high was 506 points, set by Texas in 1990.
NEWS
July 24, 1996 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jeff Rouse used to be skeptical of the Olympic motto that says it's not the winning but the taking part. If you are the world-record holder in the 100-meter backstroke, you don't simply feel the internal need to win, you also feel the external pressure. A silver medal is a bauble, nothing more. Funny how Rouse has come around to thinking that it is the taking part that's important. It's an easier position to take when you've had your ambitions fulfilled and your demons doused.
SPORTS
August 3, 1990 | From Associated Press
Jeff Rouse became only the second American ever to swim the 100-meter backstroke under 55 seconds at the U.S. Swimming Long Course National Championships Thursday. Rouse's time of 54.79 in the preliminaries fell short of David Berkoff's world record of 54.51 set at the 1988 Olympics. In Seoul, Berkoff set the mark in the preliminaries but finished second in the final. Rouse avoided a similar situation, winning in 55.86.
SPORTS
March 29, 1991 | THERESA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite a broken left wrist that limited his training to kicking, Stanford junior Jeff Rouse shattered the American record in the 100-yard backstroke Thursday night at the NCAA Division I Championships at Texas Swim Center. Florida senior Martin Zubero, a citizen of the United States and Spain, also turned in a record-setting 1:44.01 swim in the 200 individual medley, but he was denied an American record because he competes internationally for Spain.
SPORTS
March 9, 1991 | THERESA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Since February, a broken left wrist has limited Jeff Rouse to nothing but kicking. Surprisingly, there have been no adverse effects as the Stanford junior proved Friday night with two victories in meet-record times at the Pacific 10 Championships at Belmont Plaza Pool in Long Beach. Swimming all but 10 yards under water, Rouse posted an amazing 21.84 backstroke leg to give the Cardinal the lead in the 200-yard medley relay.
SPORTS
May 19, 1996 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jeff Rouse simply wanted to swim under 55 seconds in the 100-meter backstroke Saturday at the Speedo Invitational, but he ended up with the fastest time in the world in 1996 with a first-place finish of 54.86. It was a better time than he had at the Olympic trials, when he finished second in 55.15 behind Tripp Schwenk. Rouse is the world-record holder in the event at 53.86. "That was a really bad time [at the trials]," he said. "This gives me a lot of confidence."
SPORTS
July 14, 2003 | Dan Arritt, Times Staff Writer
Jeff Rouse wouldn't put himself through a comeback if he didn't believe he had a chance. Rouse, a two-time Olympic gold medalist in the 100-meter backstroke and the event's top-ranked swimmer in the world from 1989 to 1996, continued to show he's serious about making the United States 2004 Olympic team. Rouse, 33, looked strong while finishing second in the 100 backstroke Sunday in the Janet Evans Invitational at USC. Rouse finished in 56.
SPORTS
July 5, 1992 | THERESA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At this stage in their training, weary from heavy conditioning and three weeks away from the start of the Olympic Games in Spain, any swimmer within three seconds of his best time is on track. So what does that say about Jeff Rouse's eye-popping 55.34-second 100-meter backstroke Saturday in the Olympic sendoff meet at the Mission Viejo International Swimming Complex? "It means he is ready for a big swim," U.S. Olympic assistant coach Jon Urbanchek said. "A very big swim."
NEWS
July 24, 1996 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Penny Heyns must have felt she was carrying the hopes of South Africa on her shoulders, having received a congratulatory fax from President Nelson Mandela and having patiently answered questions about what another gold medal would mean for the country still emerging from decades of sporting isolation. Amanda Beard of Irvine, 14, seven years younger than Heyns, has been carrying a teddy bear around. Nerves are for adults and for Beard, the Olympics are one big slumber party.
SPORTS
May 19, 1996 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jeff Rouse simply wanted to swim under 55 seconds in the 100-meter backstroke Saturday at the Speedo Invitational, but he ended up with the fastest time in the world in 1996 with a first-place finish of 54.86. It was a better time than he had at the Olympic trials, when he finished second in 55.15 behind Tripp Schwenk. Rouse is the world-record holder in the event at 53.86. "That was a really bad time [at the trials]," he said. "This gives me a lot of confidence."
SPORTS
June 27, 1994 | ERIK HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Though only five races were scheduled for the final day of the Swim Meet of Champions on Sunday, the race was the men's 100-meter backstroke. The race featured Jeff Rouse, the world record holder in the event, and Turkish swimming star Derya Buyukuncu, who beat Rouse on Friday in the 200 backstroke at the Marguerite Aquatic Complex. Through the first 50 meters, the two were neck and neck.
SPORTS
July 5, 1992 | THERESA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At this stage in their training, weary from heavy conditioning and three weeks away from the start of the Olympic Games in Spain, any swimmer within three seconds of his best time is on track. So what does that say about Jeff Rouse's eye-popping 55.34-second 100-meter backstroke Saturday in the Olympic sendoff meet at the Mission Viejo International Swimming Complex? "It means he is ready for a big swim," U.S. Olympic assistant coach Jon Urbanchek said. "A very big swim."
SPORTS
March 29, 1992 | Associated Press
Stanford's Jeff Rouse set his fifth American record of the meet, winning the 200-yard backstroke in 1:40.64, and the Cardinal scored the most points ever while winning the team title at the NCAA men's swimming and diving championships Saturday. Stanford had 632 points to 356 for Texas. UCLA was third with 310 points. The previous high was 506 points, set by Texas in 1990.
SPORTS
March 28, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Stanford's Jeff Rouse lowered his American record in the 100-yard backstroke in the NCAA men's swimming and diving championships at Indianapolis. Rouse won the 100 backstroke in 46.12 seconds, bettering his day-old American record of 46.22. Stanford virtually wrapped up the team title with 445 points to 256 for Texas. UCLA was third at 201 points.
SPORTS
June 27, 1994 | ERIK HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Though only five races were scheduled for the final day of the Swim Meet of Champions on Sunday, the race was the men's 100-meter backstroke. The race featured Jeff Rouse, the world record holder in the event, and Turkish swimming star Derya Buyukuncu, who beat Rouse on Friday in the 200 backstroke at the Marguerite Aquatic Complex. Through the first 50 meters, the two were neck and neck.
SPORTS
March 29, 1991 | THERESA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite a broken left wrist that limited his training to kicking, Stanford junior Jeff Rouse shattered the American record in the 100-yard backstroke Thursday night at the NCAA Division I Championships at Texas Swim Center. Florida senior Martin Zubero, a citizen of the United States and Spain, also turned in a record-setting 1:44.01 swim in the 200 individual medley, but he was denied an American record because he competes internationally for Spain.
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