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Jeff Spurrier

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1985
As the leader of Gwynne's Pandoras, I resent Paula Pierce's comments that she broke up the original Pandoras because the other members "were going in a more heavy-metal direction" (L.A. Beat, by Jeff Spurrier, April 21). I personally was never interested in heavy-metal at any point in my life, and the differences that led to the split in the band were personal, not musical. GWYNNE KELLY Los Angeles
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HOME & GARDEN
January 9, 2010
When the Sensia Internet radio from Pure premiered this week at the Consumer Electronics Show, it borrowed a page from the iPhone's playbook. What might otherwise look like a typical clock radio stood out with a 5.7-inch touch screen that can make channel surfing substantially easier, faster and more fun. Instead of dials or buttons, controls are manipulated by sliding, swiping or tapping a finger. The design includes an input for an iPod or MP3 player and a virtual keyboard for on-screen searches of stations or navigation of apps for Facebook, Twitter and more.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1985
So lead singer/songwriter Mike Webber, 22, doesn't care if the name of his band--Nip Drivers--offends some people ("Nip Drivers Travel the Bizarre Route," by Jeff Spurrier, Sept. 15). With sophomoric arrogance, he dismisses his critics: "It's just a joke. . . . If people take offense to it, they probably take offense to a lot of stupid things." Well, Webber is right when he unwittingly defines his "joke" as a stupid thing. That's exactly why it offends me. It's stupid. I'm a third-generation Japanese-American who resents having an ignorant, insensitive and presumptuous snot tell me that I shouldn't be offended by racial slurs.
HOME & GARDEN
January 9, 2010
The buzzword in gardening these days isn't so much a word but an acronym: ET, short for "evapotranspiration." The term refers to the release of moisture through plant leaves, and it's invoked in discussions about intelligent watering and new products such as Rain Bird's ESP-SMT Smart Control System. Using a control panel, gardeners enter information about the site, the sprinkler type, plant and soil characteristics, sun exposure and more. Meanwhile the weather sensor pictured here monitors temperature and rainfall.
HOME & GARDEN
January 9, 2010
When the Sensia Internet radio from Pure premiered this week at the Consumer Electronics Show, it borrowed a page from the iPhone's playbook. What might otherwise look like a typical clock radio stood out with a 5.7-inch touch screen that can make channel surfing substantially easier, faster and more fun. Instead of dials or buttons, controls are manipulated by sliding, swiping or tapping a finger. The design includes an input for an iPod or MP3 player and a virtual keyboard for on-screen searches of stations or navigation of apps for Facebook, Twitter and more.
HOME & GARDEN
January 9, 2010
Luster Leaf is best known for digital monitors that check the pH and moisture levels of your soil, but the company's SunCalc targets a different variable: light. The "sunlight calculator" measures the amount of sunshine that actually reaches a specific spot during a 12-hour period -- key to determining which plants should go where. A University of Maine global warming monitoring station put the SunCalc through its paces, and it ultimately performed on a par with the school's radiometer.
HOME & GARDEN
January 9, 2010
The buzzword in gardening these days isn't so much a word but an acronym: ET, short for "evapotranspiration." The term refers to the release of moisture through plant leaves, and it's invoked in discussions about intelligent watering and new products such as Rain Bird's ESP-SMT Smart Control System. Using a control panel, gardeners enter information about the site, the sprinkler type, plant and soil characteristics, sun exposure and more. Meanwhile the weather sensor pictured here monitors temperature and rainfall.
HOME & GARDEN
January 9, 2010
If you're the type of person who starts every day with a quick tour just to see how well the garden is blooming, you'll get the idea behind PlantCam, above. It's a four-megapixel time-lapse digital camera for your landscape. Created by Wingscapes, the PlantCam operates much like the company's Audubon BirdCam, a motion-sensor camera that photographs wildlife at the backyard perch, feeder or nest. PlantCam is easy to mount on a tripod, post or even a tree trunk. Leave it alone to do its thing, and pretty soon you'll have individual frames that can be stitched together into a mini-movie of a bud opening or a leaf unfurling.
HOME & GARDEN
November 2, 2006 | Jeff Spurrier, Special to The Times
5:21 a.m. It's barely dawn, but the cars, pickups, vans, trailers and U-Haul trucks are lined up around all four sides of Veterans Stadium's parking lot, each vehicle filled with the detritus of American consumer culture. The engines are off, and vendors stand around sipping coffee, waiting for the gates to open. At the shoppers entrance, early birds wait patiently too, empty bags slung over shoulders and flashlights in hand. 5:40 a.m.
NEWS
August 9, 2012 | By Craig Nakano
Garden writer/saint Jeff Spurrier recently handed off some of his heirloom tomatoes with a reminder that I should save a few seeds of my favorites to plant next spring, naturally leading to the question: How? What's the best way to save tomato seeds? Spurrier's recent post on growing tomatillos, a cousin of the tomato, says seeds of that plant also can be saved for planting. Tomatillo seeds are actually easier, Spurrier says, requiring fewer steps in preparation for storage. He wrote about his preferred method for saving tomato seeds a couple of years ago. We dug up that story, have copied the instructions here and added notes at the end about how to tweak the process for tomatillos.
HOME & GARDEN
January 9, 2010
Luster Leaf is best known for digital monitors that check the pH and moisture levels of your soil, but the company's SunCalc targets a different variable: light. The "sunlight calculator" measures the amount of sunshine that actually reaches a specific spot during a 12-hour period -- key to determining which plants should go where. A University of Maine global warming monitoring station put the SunCalc through its paces, and it ultimately performed on a par with the school's radiometer.
HOME & GARDEN
January 9, 2010
If you're the type of person who starts every day with a quick tour just to see how well the garden is blooming, you'll get the idea behind PlantCam, above. It's a four-megapixel time-lapse digital camera for your landscape. Created by Wingscapes, the PlantCam operates much like the company's Audubon BirdCam, a motion-sensor camera that photographs wildlife at the backyard perch, feeder or nest. PlantCam is easy to mount on a tripod, post or even a tree trunk. Leave it alone to do its thing, and pretty soon you'll have individual frames that can be stitched together into a mini-movie of a bud opening or a leaf unfurling.
HOME & GARDEN
November 2, 2006 | Jeff Spurrier, Special to The Times
5:21 a.m. It's barely dawn, but the cars, pickups, vans, trailers and U-Haul trucks are lined up around all four sides of Veterans Stadium's parking lot, each vehicle filled with the detritus of American consumer culture. The engines are off, and vendors stand around sipping coffee, waiting for the gates to open. At the shoppers entrance, early birds wait patiently too, empty bags slung over shoulders and flashlights in hand. 5:40 a.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1985
So lead singer/songwriter Mike Webber, 22, doesn't care if the name of his band--Nip Drivers--offends some people ("Nip Drivers Travel the Bizarre Route," by Jeff Spurrier, Sept. 15). With sophomoric arrogance, he dismisses his critics: "It's just a joke. . . . If people take offense to it, they probably take offense to a lot of stupid things." Well, Webber is right when he unwittingly defines his "joke" as a stupid thing. That's exactly why it offends me. It's stupid. I'm a third-generation Japanese-American who resents having an ignorant, insensitive and presumptuous snot tell me that I shouldn't be offended by racial slurs.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1985
As the leader of Gwynne's Pandoras, I resent Paula Pierce's comments that she broke up the original Pandoras because the other members "were going in a more heavy-metal direction" (L.A. Beat, by Jeff Spurrier, April 21). I personally was never interested in heavy-metal at any point in my life, and the differences that led to the split in the band were personal, not musical. GWYNNE KELLY Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1985
I applaud the efforts to elevate hard core to high art ("Rockers Apply for Poetic License," by Jeff Spurrier, June 16). One need only read of X's maturation into a four-chord band or Black Flag's discovery of three-syllable words to realize that we're dealing here not with youthful exuberance run amok, but with genius. And now gutsy-as-heck poetry, too. If only Rimbaud had had a Strat. Suggestion: Why not print the next punk poetry article in the Book Review where it belongs, OK?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1987
I thought Calendar's article about the renaissance of the L.A. club scene was really cool ("Renaissance After Hours," by Steve Hochman and Jeff Spurrier, April 5). I take issue with the White Trash au Go Go's owner's statement that there are not enough cool people in L.A. to have a club for 2,000. There are no cool people in L.A. period. Well, OK, there are four cool people in L.A.: Frank Zappa, Brian Wilson, Jack Nicholson and Smokey Robinson. The problem with L.A. is that it is too trendy to produce cool.
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