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Jeff Tweedy

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December 16, 2013 | By Randall Roberts
Near the end of the first of Jeff Tweedy's four-night residency at Largo in Los Angeles, the Wilco founder started discussing the set like he was doing a post-game interview.  "There wasn't anything left to give," he wryly observed,  phlegmy and on the verge of a cold with a throat that over the evening had started to break. "I feel like I left my best stuff out there on the field," he added. He was kidding, but the Chicago-based rock/folk/country guitarist and songwriter had a point.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2014 | By Yvonne Villarreal
Nick Offerman, who plays surly, meat-lovin' Ron Swanson on NBC's "Parks and Recreation," was at the helm of Thursday's big reveal episode, directing Amy Poehler as she delivered that squeal-worthy "Well, buddy, ... " line. It's the second episode the man with impeccable upper lip hair has directed. And -- spoiler alert -- it was quite the one to take on, as it sees Leslie Knope faced with another major milestone in her life: motherhood. We spoke with Offerman, who is currently in New York, where he's appearing in the off-Broadway production of "Annapurna" with his wife, Megan Mullaly, and asked about his reaction to the big plot twist, geeking out over guest star Jeff Tweedy of Wilco, and his thoughts on former costar Rob Lowe's tough life as a handsome man. BEST TV OF 2013 Lloyd | McNamara ------------------------------------- I'm mad at myself because I come into this interview having not had breakfast this morning.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2001 | STEVE APPLEFORD
There is comfort in the dark. That's a terrain that Jeff Tweedy has often explored as the leader of Wilco, finding emotional truth in moments of desperate love and bitter isolation. And when he's standing alone with a guitar, Tweedy's songs of melancholy and wit are often at their darkest and most moving.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2014 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Musically speaking, one of the best parts of the breakout success of “True Detective” is the window it opens into the world of the Handsome Family. The husband-wife duo of Brett and Rennie Sparks composed “Far From Any Road,” used each week in the HBO mystery's opening credits, but that tells only a tiny part of their story. For the last two decades the pair has been using the blueprints of old-time country and western balladry to create dark but often lovely narratives set in the present.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2006 | Richard Cromelin, Times Staff Writer
"No depression" has been used to describe a strand of alternative American roots music since the early '90s, but for Jeff Tweedy, whose music helped inspire the phrase, the two words now have a more immediate and literal significance. Two years after going through rehab for anxiety disorders and addiction to painkillers, the singer and songwriter says he feels like a new person.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1996 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Jeff Tweedy's songs were entirely about himself on "Being There," the terrific new album by his band, Wilco, he wouldn't be anywhere. A recurring theme that lends this 19-track, double-CD release some of its shape and cohesion is the nagging feeling that developing an obsession for playing rock 'n' roll is like falling into a deep hole.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2014 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Musically speaking, one of the best parts of the breakout success of “True Detective” is the window it opens into the world of the Handsome Family. The husband-wife duo of Brett and Rennie Sparks composed “Far From Any Road,” used each week in the HBO mystery's opening credits, but that tells only a tiny part of their story. For the last two decades the pair has been using the blueprints of old-time country and western balladry to create dark but often lovely narratives set in the present.
NEWS
April 8, 2004 | From Baltimore Sun and Associated Press
Showing that even freeloaders have a heart, fans of the rock band Wilco have contributed more than $3,500 to the band's favorite charity as a token payment for downloading Wilco's new record off the Internet. The new record, "A Ghost Is Born," won't be released until June 22. But when copies leaked out last month, the band responded in a novel way.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2014 | By Yvonne Villarreal
Nick Offerman, who plays surly, meat-lovin' Ron Swanson on NBC's "Parks and Recreation," was at the helm of Thursday's big reveal episode, directing Amy Poehler as she delivered that squeal-worthy "Well, buddy, ... " line. It's the second episode the man with impeccable upper lip hair has directed. And -- spoiler alert -- it was quite the one to take on, as it sees Leslie Knope faced with another major milestone in her life: motherhood. We spoke with Offerman, who is currently in New York, where he's appearing in the off-Broadway production of "Annapurna" with his wife, Megan Mullaly, and asked about his reaction to the big plot twist, geeking out over guest star Jeff Tweedy of Wilco, and his thoughts on former costar Rob Lowe's tough life as a handsome man. BEST TV OF 2013 Lloyd | McNamara ------------------------------------- I'm mad at myself because I come into this interview having not had breakfast this morning.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2013 | By Randall Roberts
Near the end of the first of Jeff Tweedy's four-night residency at Largo in Los Angeles, the Wilco founder started discussing the set like he was doing a post-game interview.  "There wasn't anything left to give," he wryly observed,  phlegmy and on the verge of a cold with a throat that over the evening had started to break. "I feel like I left my best stuff out there on the field," he added. He was kidding, but the Chicago-based rock/folk/country guitarist and songwriter had a point.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2010 | By Todd Martens, Los Angeles Times
It's early July, and Mavis Staples is sitting in the Silver Lake-based offices of Epitaph Records, a truth that is surprising to her. The 71-year-old gospel and soul legend from Chicago isn't the first artist of heritage status to be embraced by Epitaph's adventurous Anti- division, but she's no doubt outnumbered by the corporation's younger, more punk-leaning brethren. None of that, however, explains why Staples is stunned this afternoon, repeatedly using the words "awesome" and "blessed" during an hour-long interview.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2006 | Richard Cromelin, Times Staff Writer
"No depression" has been used to describe a strand of alternative American roots music since the early '90s, but for Jeff Tweedy, whose music helped inspire the phrase, the two words now have a more immediate and literal significance. Two years after going through rehab for anxiety disorders and addiction to painkillers, the singer and songwriter says he feels like a new person.
NEWS
May 6, 2004 | Colin Devenish, Special to The Times
On the day before he had been scheduled to play on a Coachella bill featuring Radiohead, the Pixies and the Cure, Wilco frontman Jeff Tweedy is at home in Chicago, resting after a recently completed stay in rehab that caused the group to cancel all tour dates until the end of May. The timing of Tweedy's detour could hardly have been worse.
NEWS
April 8, 2004 | From Baltimore Sun and Associated Press
Showing that even freeloaders have a heart, fans of the rock band Wilco have contributed more than $3,500 to the band's favorite charity as a token payment for downloading Wilco's new record off the Internet. The new record, "A Ghost Is Born," won't be released until June 22. But when copies leaked out last month, the band responded in a novel way.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2001 | STEVE APPLEFORD
There is comfort in the dark. That's a terrain that Jeff Tweedy has often explored as the leader of Wilco, finding emotional truth in moments of desperate love and bitter isolation. And when he's standing alone with a guitar, Tweedy's songs of melancholy and wit are often at their darkest and most moving.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1995 | LORRAINE ALI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Somebody at the airport asked us what kind of band we were," says Jeff Tweedy, formerly of the country-powered underground band Uncle Tupelo and now leader of its spinoff, Wilco. "I said, 'Well, we're kinda country.' She said, 'No!' I said, 'Wanna bet?' " True: Tweedy's appearance--today he's wearing a green polyester sports jacket over a '70s-style striped dress shirt--doesn't exactly scream Nashville. But peeking out from under all the toxic garb is a T-shirt that reads "Bill Monroe Country."
NEWS
May 6, 2004 | Colin Devenish, Special to The Times
On the day before he had been scheduled to play on a Coachella bill featuring Radiohead, the Pixies and the Cure, Wilco frontman Jeff Tweedy is at home in Chicago, resting after a recently completed stay in rehab that caused the group to cancel all tour dates until the end of May. The timing of Tweedy's detour could hardly have been worse.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1999 | LORRAINE ALI, Lorraine Ali is a freelance writer who specializes in pop culture
"I hope I don't sound like Gomer Pyle. Ya know, totally inarticulate," says Jeff Tweedy. "I'm just trying to resist the urge to sound like I know what I'm talking about. That's the worst thing you can do, pretend like there's some master plan to it all." The comment seems incongruous coming from one of the most acclaimed pop-rock songwriters and lyricists of the '90s. With his current band Wilco and former group Uncle Tupelo, Tweedy has become one of alternative music's major forces.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1996 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Jeff Tweedy's songs were entirely about himself on "Being There," the terrific new album by his band, Wilco, he wouldn't be anywhere. A recurring theme that lends this 19-track, double-CD release some of its shape and cohesion is the nagging feeling that developing an obsession for playing rock 'n' roll is like falling into a deep hole.
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