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Jefferson High

NEWS
March 28, 1993 | ELSTON CARR
Thomas Jefferson High School has received a $9,000 grant from the state Department of Conservation to start a student-run recycling center. The grant, which was officially presented to the school March 18, was requested by school administrators who hope to encourage recycling. "We want to make our population, our community more aware of the need to conserve our environment," said Principal Philip Saldivar.
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SPORTS
September 12, 1992 | ERIC SHEPARD
Jefferson High's football team had to forfeit its season opener Friday against Lincoln because it couldn't field enough eligible players. As of Friday morning, Jefferson had only 13 eligible players. Coach Henry Johnson told administrators that he might have been able to clear six more, but that was not enough to satisfy City Commissioner Hal Harkness. "The bottom line is safety, and I told Jefferson that 13 or 19 players was not an acceptable (number) to me," Harkness said.
NEWS
December 4, 1994 | KIRBY LEE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Jefferson High girls' and boys' basketball teams have dedicated their season to Demorrio Wright, a boys' assistant coach who died Nov. 11 after a 2 1/2-year battle with leukemia. Jefferson teachers, administrators and students were among the 600 mourners who crowded into Neighborhood Community Church Nov. 16 to remember the 32-year-old alumnus who played football and basketball at Jefferson. Wright, survived by a wife and two children, was buried at Inglewood Park Cemetery.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2005 | Cara Mia DiMassa, Times Staff Writer
The school day at Jefferson High School passed without incident Tuesday. But it was far from typical. After a surprise visit from Los Angeles Unified School District Supt. Roy Romer, Mayor James K. Hahn showed up. At one point, school Police Chief Alan Kerstein, who was also there, said 29 school police officers patrolled the South Los Angeles campus and 12 more roamed nearby. Attendance at the 2,400-student school was down by almost half.
NEWS
August 28, 1994 | CHARLES SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With a nickname like Ike, Jefferson High running back Isaac Hatley seems destined to be in the public eye. And with his speed, quickness and durability, Hatley is expected to remain in the spotlight. "Ike is a very tough, slashing-type runner with extreme quickness," said Ken Johnson, former assistant coach at Jefferson. "Pound-for-pound, he is one of the toughest kids I have been associated with at Jefferson." When you are 5-foot-8, 160 pounds, tenacity is necessary.
SPORTS
July 22, 1993 | LONNIE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It might have been a non-contact drill, but Raider linebacker Joe Kelly didn't hesitate tackling Nick Bell by the neck during a recent training camp practice. The tackle upset some of Kelly's teammates on offense, but it underlined why he was signed as an unrestricted free agent this off-season by the Raiders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1996 | AMY PYLE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Fresh from his own graduation from Harvard Law School, David Campos rose Thursday before nearly 400 Jefferson High graduates and their families and friends to urge the students toward prosperity and success. It is a route that Campos, 25, knows well. The son of a South-Central Los Angeles warehouse worker, Campos graduated from Jefferson High as valedictorian in 1989, less than five years after he arrived from Guatemala.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2013 | By Kurt Streeter
Tennis isn't much of a big deal at South L.A.'s struggling Jefferson High. The two dozen kids who play on the boys' and girls' teams practice on a pair of beaten courts at a gang-riddled, graffiti-tagged park. It wasn't long ago that both squads - stacked with teens still learning basic tennis rules - shared six beaten rackets and sometimes played in jeans. "Shoes?" said David Herrera, who coaches the girls' team. "A lot of my players didn't even know there was such a thing as shoes made just for tennis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1996 | MAKI BECKER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Debrah Constance, 48, once a real estate executive, is now the leader of a gang. She's even got the name of the gang tattooed around her wrist: A-P-C-H. It stands for "A Place Called Home." Two years ago, Constance left her job at a Beverly Hills real estate firm to start a safe house for students at Jefferson High School in South-Central Los Angeles. About 40 of them signed up.
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