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Jefferson Mays

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2013 | By David Ng
The death of Margaret Thatcher this week has created renewed public interest -- and, for some, nostalgia -- for British politics during the 1980s. "Yes, Prime Minister," the play based on the popular '80s sitcom that ran on the BBC, is scheduled to have its U.S. premiere at the Geffen Playhouse on June 12. The company announced Wednesday that the cast will feature Michael McKean, Jefferson Mays and Dakin Matthews. "Yes, Prime Minister" ran on British television from 1986 to 1988 -- at the height of Thatcherism -- and was the sequel to the hit sitcom "Yes, Minister.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
The musical comedy “A Gentleman's Guide to Love & Murder” may be nearly as nimble as its lead actor, Jefferson Mays, who plays multiple characters and dies no less than eight times in the production. In its third incarnation, the production will transfer to Broadway this fall, its producers announced Thursday. “A Gentleman's Guide,” based on the Roy Horniman novel “Israel Rank” and directed by Darko Tresnjak, had a joint world premiere as a co-production between the Hartford Stage last fall and the Old Globe Theatre in San Diego, where it recently finished a March 8 to April 14 run. It's set in Britain in the Edwardian era and follows a could-be duke ninth in line to inherit the title.
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TRAVEL
October 2, 2005
In the one-man play "I Am My Own Wife," Mays plays more than 30 characters. He's now touring the show after a multi-Tony-winning Broadway run. "We went recently to Osmosis, a day spa just north of San Francisco, and sat in great tubs of Japanese compost. It's a purification thing. They have the most idyllic surroundings imaginable: this beautifully made Zen garden you can wander through and these little massage huts out in the woods. It's quite extraordinary.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2013 | By David Ng
The death of Margaret Thatcher this week has created renewed public interest -- and, for some, nostalgia -- for British politics during the 1980s. "Yes, Prime Minister," the play based on the popular '80s sitcom that ran on the BBC, is scheduled to have its U.S. premiere at the Geffen Playhouse on June 12. The company announced Wednesday that the cast will feature Michael McKean, Jefferson Mays and Dakin Matthews. "Yes, Prime Minister" ran on British television from 1986 to 1988 -- at the height of Thatcherism -- and was the sequel to the hit sitcom "Yes, Minister.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
The musical comedy “A Gentleman's Guide to Love & Murder” may be nearly as nimble as its lead actor, Jefferson Mays, who plays multiple characters and dies no less than eight times in the production. In its third incarnation, the production will transfer to Broadway this fall, its producers announced Thursday. “A Gentleman's Guide,” based on the Roy Horniman novel “Israel Rank” and directed by Darko Tresnjak, had a joint world premiere as a co-production between the Hartford Stage last fall and the Old Globe Theatre in San Diego, where it recently finished a March 8 to April 14 run. It's set in Britain in the Edwardian era and follows a could-be duke ninth in line to inherit the title.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2013 | By Margaret Gray
While Jefferson Mays was performing in "A Gentleman's Guide to Love and Murder" in the fall of 2012 at Hartford Stage, he recalls, his wife kept overhearing variations on the same remark at intermission: "Isn't it wonderful how they got actors who all look the same to play the different members of the D'Ysquith family?" "It made me very happy and really depressed, simultaneously," says Mays, who was in fact the only actor cast to play all nine D'Ysquiths (DIE-squiths), aristocrats in line for a dukedom who get inventively bumped off one by one by an ambitious relative.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2002 | MIKE BOEHM
If Des McAnuff has learned one thing about Jefferson Mays in the 13 years since they began working together, it's that this little-known but highly regarded stage actor is often at play when he's at work. "With Jefferson, the entire rehearsal process is hysterical," says McAnuff, La Jolla Playhouse artistic director, who is staging Moliere's "Tartuffe" with Mays in the title role.
NATIONAL
July 29, 2006 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
The Justice Department's bribery investigation of Rep. William J. Jefferson (D-La.) suffered a setback Friday when a federal appeals court ruled that Jefferson was entitled to review documents investigators seized during a raid of his Capitol Hill office and file objections. The order from the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia upsets a ruling by a lower court judge that the search of Jefferson's office -- believed to be the first in congressional history -- was proper.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
SAN DIEGO - All the buzz about "A Gentleman's Guide to Love and Murder," the clever new musical comedy pastiche that seems to be wending its Edwardian way to Broadway, is redeemed by the ingenious versatility and quick-change athleticism of actor Jefferson Mays. In this delightfully silly, if not fully cooked show, written by Robert L. Freedman and Steven Lutvak, Mays impersonates a series of English aristocrats - the eccentric fruit from the snooty D'Ysquith family tree - each of whom gets knocked off under circumstances that can only be considered highly suspicious.
SPORTS
September 5, 2012 | Chris Dufresne
Pat Haden mentioned out loud in his office only days ago that 85% of his job was great. "And 15% of it … is full of angst," USC's director of athletics said. Welcome to the angst part. New allegations from the old regime have interrupted the Trojans' comeback campaign and threaten to put the program in an even deeper ditch. If reports prove true that football running back Joe McKnight and basketball player Davon Jefferson received improper benefits, the NCAA has the option to reopen the book it threw at USC in 2010.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
SAN DIEGO - All the buzz about "A Gentleman's Guide to Love and Murder," the clever new musical comedy pastiche that seems to be wending its Edwardian way to Broadway, is redeemed by the ingenious versatility and quick-change athleticism of actor Jefferson Mays. In this delightfully silly, if not fully cooked show, written by Robert L. Freedman and Steven Lutvak, Mays impersonates a series of English aristocrats - the eccentric fruit from the snooty D'Ysquith family tree - each of whom gets knocked off under circumstances that can only be considered highly suspicious.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2013 | By Margaret Gray
While Jefferson Mays was performing in "A Gentleman's Guide to Love and Murder" in the fall of 2012 at Hartford Stage, he recalls, his wife kept overhearing variations on the same remark at intermission: "Isn't it wonderful how they got actors who all look the same to play the different members of the D'Ysquith family?" "It made me very happy and really depressed, simultaneously," says Mays, who was in fact the only actor cast to play all nine D'Ysquiths (DIE-squiths), aristocrats in line for a dukedom who get inventively bumped off one by one by an ambitious relative.
SPORTS
September 5, 2012 | Chris Dufresne
Pat Haden mentioned out loud in his office only days ago that 85% of his job was great. "And 15% of it … is full of angst," USC's director of athletics said. Welcome to the angst part. New allegations from the old regime have interrupted the Trojans' comeback campaign and threaten to put the program in an even deeper ditch. If reports prove true that football running back Joe McKnight and basketball player Davon Jefferson received improper benefits, the NCAA has the option to reopen the book it threw at USC in 2010.
NATIONAL
July 29, 2006 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
The Justice Department's bribery investigation of Rep. William J. Jefferson (D-La.) suffered a setback Friday when a federal appeals court ruled that Jefferson was entitled to review documents investigators seized during a raid of his Capitol Hill office and file objections. The order from the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia upsets a ruling by a lower court judge that the search of Jefferson's office -- believed to be the first in congressional history -- was proper.
TRAVEL
October 2, 2005
In the one-man play "I Am My Own Wife," Mays plays more than 30 characters. He's now touring the show after a multi-Tony-winning Broadway run. "We went recently to Osmosis, a day spa just north of San Francisco, and sat in great tubs of Japanese compost. It's a purification thing. They have the most idyllic surroundings imaginable: this beautifully made Zen garden you can wander through and these little massage huts out in the woods. It's quite extraordinary.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2002 | MIKE BOEHM
If Des McAnuff has learned one thing about Jefferson Mays in the 13 years since they began working together, it's that this little-known but highly regarded stage actor is often at play when he's at work. "With Jefferson, the entire rehearsal process is hysterical," says McAnuff, La Jolla Playhouse artistic director, who is staging Moliere's "Tartuffe" with Mays in the title role.
NEWS
August 30, 1994 | EDMUND NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When we last saw Tom and Sally, they were back on the farm, entertaining friends, watching their children grow up and slowly, inexorably, going broke. He was, of course, our improvident third President, Thomas Jefferson, settling into uneasy retirement at Monticello, his northern Virginia plantation. And she was the mysterious Sally Hemings, a Monticello slave, with whom, according to some historians, Jefferson had seven children.
BUSINESS
June 12, 2000 | CHARLES PILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scientists have announced a breakthrough that found its inspiration in Thomas Jefferson's invention that created multiple copies of a signature with a single signing. A modern version of that could lead to the production of ultra-powerful microprocessors and better medical diagnostic methods. This new rendering device could improve photolithography--a key semiconductor-production method that uses light to etch circuitry pathways on photosensitive materials--according to Chad A.
BUSINESS
June 12, 2000 | CHARLES PILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scientists have announced a breakthrough that found its inspiration in Thomas Jefferson's invention that created multiple copies of a signature with a single signing. A modern version of that could lead to the production of ultra-powerful microprocessors and better medical diagnostic methods. This new rendering device could improve photolithography--a key semiconductor-production method that uses light to etch circuitry pathways on photosensitive materials--according to Chad A.
NEWS
August 30, 1994 | EDMUND NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When we last saw Tom and Sally, they were back on the farm, entertaining friends, watching their children grow up and slowly, inexorably, going broke. He was, of course, our improvident third President, Thomas Jefferson, settling into uneasy retirement at Monticello, his northern Virginia plantation. And she was the mysterious Sally Hemings, a Monticello slave, with whom, according to some historians, Jefferson had seven children.
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